Abraham in History and Tradition

( 1 )

Overview

Originally published by Yale University Press, Abraham in History and Tradition evaluates previous scholarly insight on the early patriarchal period while challenging many dominant views in Biblical Studies and providing criticism on tradition history and documentary hypothesis. Upon its initial publication in 1975, this landmark work provided fresh insight in the fields of Near Eastern Studies and Biblical Archaeology. Well-researched and cogent, Van Seters' groundbreaking analysis remains relevant and continues...

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More About This Book

Overview

Originally published by Yale University Press, Abraham in History and Tradition evaluates previous scholarly insight on the early patriarchal period while challenging many dominant views in Biblical Studies and providing criticism on tradition history and documentary hypothesis. Upon its initial publication in 1975, this landmark work provided fresh insight in the fields of Near Eastern Studies and Biblical Archaeology. Well-researched and cogent, Van Seters' groundbreaking analysis remains relevant and continues to inspire new research in the present.

John Van Seters is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

"An important work which cannot be ignored."

-Journal of Biblical Literature

"The author has undertaken an objective evaluation of the more serious scholarly attempts at reconstructing the early Patriarchal Period during the past half century of archaeologically oriented research. . . . He presents a wealth of extra biblical material, in conjunction with the biblical, to determine how much of the data dealing with Abraham (and in part with Isaac) are historical and how the data in general are to be handled. . . . The study provides a badly needed whiff of fresh air in a period whose scholarly atmosphere has become stale. Three useful indexes . . . bring this volume to a close."

-Harry Orlinsky, JWB Circle

"Old Testament Scholars have learned to expect critical precision and provocative insight from the pen of John Van Seters. His book on the Abraham traditions meets those expectations in detail not previously available in print and this must be welcomed by all involved in Pentateuchal research."

-George W. Coats, Interpretation

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781626549104
  • Publisher: Echo Point Books & Media
  • Publication date: 3/11/2014
  • Pages: 350
  • Product dimensions: 6.69 (w) x 9.61 (h) x 0.73 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 29, 2014

    Critical Analysis of Abraham John Van Seter's focus in "Ab

    Critical Analysis of Abraham

    John Van Seter's focus in "Abraham in History and Tradition" speaks against the older generation of religiously-motivated 'biblical archaeologists' and others who thought what was written about Abraham in Genesis fit the facts well and that it went back to pre-literate oral tradition. It's got two sections... one is about the historicity of the general cultural/historical milieu as presented in Genesis (he argues Genesis doesn't paint an accurate portrait)... and the other is about the Genesis narrative itself (he argues that it doesn't have claim to any great antiquity or go back to some super ancient oral tradition).

    There were a bunch of people in the first half of the 20th century who thought the stuff in the Abe narratives (places, names, ways of life, etc.) were consistent with the archeology of the Middle East Bronze Age and this gave the stories a certain historical verisimilitude (so even if they didn't think it was 100% true, they thought it was very plausible that it was, and they would say 'yea, this is all super old tradition, it probably goes back to the Bronze Age).

    I think a variety of theists will enjoy this book.

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