Absence of Mind: The Dispelling of Inwardness from the Modern Myth of the Self

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$23.04
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 91%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $1.99   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   

Overview

In this ambitious book, acclaimed writer Marilynne Robinson applies her astute intellect to some of the most vexing topics in the history of human thought—science, religion, and consciousness. Crafted with the same care and insight as her award-winning novels, Absence of Mind challenges postmodern atheists who crusade against religion under the banner of science. In Robinson’s view, scientific reasoning does not denote a sense of logical infallibility, as thinkers like Richard Dawkins might suggest. Instead, in its purest form, science represents a search for answers. It engages the problem of knowledge, an aspect of the mystery of consciousness, rather than providing a simple and final model of reality.

By defending the importance of individual reflection, Robinson celebrates the power and variety of human consciousness in the tradition of William James. She explores the nature of subjectivity and considers the culture in which Sigmund Freud was situated and its influence on his model of self and civilization. Through keen interpretations of language, emotion, science, and poetry, Absence of Mind restores human consciousness to its central place in the religion-science debate.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

In her first nonfiction book in a dozen years, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Marilynne Robinson addresses the junctures and disjunctions of science, religion, and consciousness. While others have jumped into the fray with cleavers, the author of Housekeeping, Gilead, and Home offers calm reflections on the limits of scientific reasoning and the central importance of individual reflection. Her measured appraisal reminds one of a critic's description of Robinson as "a miraculous anomaly: a writer who thoughtfully, carefully, and tenaciously explores some of the deepest questions confronting the human species." An apt suggestion for crossover readers.

Publishers Weekly
Robinson's new nonfiction work is drawn from her 2009 Terry lectures at Yale. More precisely, they are "lectures on religion in the light of science and philosophy." The charge is ambitious, and Robinson brings to the task a suitably wide-ranging perspective. She takes aim at the modern scholarly propensity to debunk, a practice she calls "flawed learnedness." It pitches out the babies of human insight with the bathwater of the past, preferring what she calls "parascience," a kind of pseudoscience that prizes certainty. This "parascience" is a latecomer in human thought, the product of only the last 150 years or so. Because it closes off questions, it's not even scientific. Nor does it allow space for the human mind and all the mind has produced in history and civilization. This is heady stuff that will particularly appeal to those familiar with the history of ideas and the many thinkers she cites, and to anyone willing to ponder broadly and humanistically about imponderable matters. Those who savor Robinson's clear prose will also be gratified; her mind, in thought, is elegant.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Los Angeles Times

“Robinson''s arguments [are] so much more interesting, capacious, and informed than most. . . . Robinson makes a strong, unapologetic case, not for mystery but for self-respect.”—Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times

— Susan Salter Reynolds

Boston Globe
"There is much to admire, and even to agree with, in Robinson''s humanist passion. Her defense of the insights to be gained from religion and literature is as convincing as her attacks on the facile generalizations of parascience."--Adam Kirsch, Boston Globe
— Adam Kirsch
Globe & Mail

Named a Best Book of 2010--Globe & Mail, "2010 Globe 100"
Maclean's

“[Robinson] is one of the best thinkers in American letters. Her new (nonfiction) work is a slashing attack on scientific fundamentalism, not on behalf of religion but of human consciousness and our traditional concept of mind.”--Maclean’s

Daily Telegraph

"[Robinson] makes the case with exceptional elegance and authority--the authority not only of one of the unmistakably great novelists of the age but of a clear and logical mind that is wholly intolerant of intellectual cliché. . . . This book has a greater density (and sophistication) of argument than many three times its length; but it is one of the most significant contributions yet to the current quarrels about faith, science and rationality."—Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury, Daily Telegraph

— Rowan Williams

Catholic Herald

"Robinson is one of the greatest Christian thinkers alive today. She is also one of the world''s best novelists. . . . Absence of Mind is a slim but compelling volume."—Luke Coppen, Catholic Herald

— Luke Coppen

Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“Marilynne Robinson asks hard questions. She challenges readers with a severe, sophisticated and spellbinding style and a determination to change the conversation about contemporary American culture. . . . Absence of Mind is important not so much as a brief for religion but as a tenacious and often trenchant critique of modern Western thought.”—Glenn Altschuler, Minneapolis Star-Tribune

— Glenn Altschuler

The Revealer

“What Robinson has over both the parascientific writers whose work she rejects and the religion writers with whom she finds common ground is a long career (though few books) as a fiction writer, where she has demonstrated—and in her way, provided evidence of—the very contemplative, subjective lives of the faithful she defends in her new book.”—Scott Korb, The Revealer

— Scott Korb

Washington Post

"These impassioned pages require and reward very close attention."—Michael Dirda, Washington Post

— Michael Dirda

American Scholar

"[Robinson reveals] how deep a debt both science and religion owe to art. . . . It is a rare treat to have a novelist express herself so forcefully, and so eloquently, in another medium."—Ingrid Rowland, American Scholar

— Ingrid Rowland

Books & Culture

"The scope of Robinson''s erudition is stunning, and she shares it with generosity and no dissembling."—Linda McCullough Moore, Books & Culture

— Linda McCullough Moore

Big Questions Online

"Marked by a luminous intelligence and a rather attractive intellectual severity. . . . One really must read it to appreciate how powerful a counterinsurgency it mounts against many of the peculiar superstitions of our age."—David B. Hart, Big Questions Online

— David B. Hart

Washington Times

"Robinson applies her astute intellect to . . . science, religion and consciousness. Crafted with the same care and insight as her award-winning novels, the book challenges postmodern atheists who crusade against religion under the banner of science."—Washington Times
The National

"Following the inward-looking path of her award-winning fiction, Marilynne Robinson''s Absence of Mind is a finely wrought treatise in favour of religious belief."—Chris Lehmann, The National

— Chris Lehmann

IrishTimes

"This is a wonderful little book, full of wisdom, warmth and wit. . . . [Robinson] is able to apply her astute intellect, delicious sense of humour, incisive insight into human nature and down-to-earth philosophy of life."—Mark Patrick Hederman, Irish Times

— Mark Patrick Hederman

The Observer

"I''m enjoying arguing and agreeing with Marilynne Robinson''s Absence of Mind."— Zadie Smith, The Observer


— Zadie Smith

The Guardian

"Robinson''s argument is prophetic, profound, eloquent, succinct, powerful and timely." — Karen Armstrong, The Guardian

— Karen Armstrong

Literary Review

"I have barely scratched the surface of this dense and yet endlessly entertaining little book. Marilynne Robinson is herself the best evidence of her own thesis--the exceptional mystery of the human mind." — Bryan Appleyard, Literary Review

— Bryan Appleyard

Financial Times

"I enjoyed reading Absence of Mind. The reason: it is always a pleasure to keep company with a person who takes ideas seriously." — Siri Hustvedt, Financial Times

— Siri Hustvedt

The Australian

"It is worth admiring Robinson''s bravery and intellectual independence, and noting the sheer force and capacity of language like hers to persuade." — Geordie Williamson, The Australian

— Geordie Williamson

Christian Week

"A book of dense philosophy from a brilliant novelist with a poet''s ear. It is stunning. It places Robinson among the very brightest of Christian history''s thinkers and writers. . . . I cannot praise it too highly."—Kurt Armstrong, Christian Week

— Kurt Armstrong

San Francisco Chronicle

“This deeply informed essay affirms mystery, imagination and wonder against the 19th-century remnants of positivism still delimiting the human in the name of a reduced and reductive science.”San Francisco Chronicle


Los Angeles Times - Susan Salter Reynolds

“Robinson's arguments [are] so much more interesting, capacious, and informed than most. . . . Robinson makes a strong, unapologetic case, not for mystery but for self-respect.”—Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
Boston Globe - Adam Kirsch
"There is much to admire, and even to agree with, in Robinson's humanist passion. Her defense of the insights to be gained from religion and literature is as convincing as her attacks on the facile generalizations of parascience."--Adam Kirsch, Boston Globe
Daily Telegraph - Rowan Williams

"[Robinson] makes the case with exceptional elegance and authority--the authority not only of one of the unmistakably great novelists of the age but of a clear and logical mind that is wholly intolerant of intellectual cliché. . . . This book has a greater density (and sophistication) of argument than many three times its length; but it is one of the most significant contributions yet to the current quarrels about faith, science and rationality."—Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury, Daily Telegraph

Catholic Herald - Luke Coppen

"Robinson is one of the greatest Christian thinkers alive today. She is also one of the world's best novelists. . . . Absence of Mind is a slim but compelling volume."—Luke Coppen, Catholic Herald
Minneapolis Star-Tribune - Glenn Altschuler

“Marilynne Robinson asks hard questions. She challenges readers with a severe, sophisticated and spellbinding style and a determination to change the conversation about contemporary American culture. . . . Absence of Mind is important not so much as a brief for religion but as a tenacious and often trenchant critique of modern Western thought.”—Glenn Altschuler, Minneapolis Star-Tribune
The Revealer - Scott Korb

“What Robinson has over both the parascientific writers whose work she rejects and the religion writers with whom she finds common ground is a long career (though few books) as a fiction writer, where she has demonstrated—and in her way, provided evidence of—the very contemplative, subjective lives of the faithful she defends in her new book.”—Scott Korb, The Revealer
Washington Post - Michael Dirda

"These impassioned pages require and reward very close attention."—Michael Dirda, Washington Post
American Scholar - Ingrid Rowland

"[Robinson reveals] how deep a debt both science and religion owe to art. . . . It is a rare treat to have a novelist express herself so forcefully, and so eloquently, in another medium."—Ingrid Rowland, American Scholar
Books & Culture - Linda McCullough Moore

"The scope of Robinson's erudition is stunning, and she shares it with generosity and no dissembling."—Linda McCullough Moore, Books & Culture
Big Questions Online - David B. Hart

"Marked by a luminous intelligence and a rather attractive intellectual severity. . . . One really must read it to appreciate how powerful a counterinsurgency it mounts against many of the peculiar superstitions of our age."—David B. Hart, Big Questions Online
The National - Chris Lehmann

"Following the inward-looking path of her award-winning fiction, Marilynne Robinson's Absence of Mind is a finely wrought treatise in favour of religious belief."—Chris Lehmann, The National
IrishTimes - Mark Patrick Hederman

"This is a wonderful little book, full of wisdom, warmth and wit. . . . [Robinson] is able to apply her astute intellect, delicious sense of humour, incisive insight into human nature and down-to-earth philosophy of life."—Mark Patrick Hederman, Irish Times
The Observer - Zadie Smith

"I'm enjoying arguing and agreeing with Marilynne Robinson's Absence of Mind."— Zadie Smith, The Observer
The Guardian - Karen Armstrong

"Robinson's argument is prophetic, profound, eloquent, succinct, powerful and timely." — Karen Armstrong, The Guardian
Literary Review - Bryan Appleyard

"I have barely scratched the surface of this dense and yet endlessly entertaining little book. Marilynne Robinson is herself the best evidence of her own thesis--the exceptional mystery of the human mind." — Bryan Appleyard, Literary Review
Financial Times - Siri Hustvedt

"I enjoyed reading Absence of Mind. The reason: it is always a pleasure to keep company with a person who takes ideas seriously." — Siri Hustvedt, Financial Times
The Australian - Geordie Williamson

"It is worth admiring Robinson's bravery and intellectual independence, and noting the sheer force and capacity of language like hers to persuade." — Geordie Williamson, The Australian
Christian Week - Kurt Armstrong

"A book of dense philosophy from a brilliant novelist with a poet's ear. It is stunning. It places Robinson among the very brightest of Christian history's thinkers and writers. . . . I cannot praise it too highly."—Kurt Armstrong, Christian Week
CHOICE - S. C. Pearson

"Readers interested in seriously thinking about science, culture, and religion, and their interrelationships, will find this book rewarding."—S. C. Pearson, CHOICE
The Weekly Standard - Barton Swaim

"One of the best things about the literature of the New Atheists is that, for all the supercilious question-begging, it has provoked a number of highly literate and memorable responses. This is one of them."—Barton Swaim, The Weekly Standard
The Living Church - Jean McCurdy Meade

"Absense of Mind is a succinct and carefully reasoned challenge to those who would say that all our thoughts, beliefs, aspirations, and intimations of immortality are only a combination of wishful thinking and outdated primitive beliefs."—Dr. Jean McCurdy Meade, The Living Church
The New Criterion - Stefan Beck

"Marilynne Robinson is one of those rare novelists whose work, though galvanized by a theological impulse, is adored by believers and atheists in equal measure. . . . We experience [her characters'] interiority almost as naturally as our own, and respond to it emotionally, intellectually, even spiritually. Robinson's latest collection, Absence of Mind, gets to the hear of that creative force, while reminding us what little heed she pays intellectual fashion."—Stefan Beck, The New Criterion
CHOICE

"Readers interested in seriously thinking about science, culture, and religion, and their interrelationships, will find this book rewarding."—S. C. Pearson, CHOICE

— S. C. Pearson

The Weekly Standard

"One of the best things about the literature of the New Atheists is that, for all the supercilious question-begging, it has provoked a number of highly literate and memorable responses. This is one of them."—Barton Swaim, The Weekly Standard

— Barton Swaim

The Living Church

"Absense of Mind is a succinct and carefully reasoned challenge to those who would say that all our thoughts, beliefs, aspirations, and intimations of immortality are only a combination of wishful thinking and outdated primitive beliefs."—Dr. Jean McCurdy Meade, The Living Church

— Jean McCurdy Meade

The New Criterion

"Marilynne Robinson is one of those rare novelists whose work, though galvanized by a theological impulse, is adored by believers and atheists in equal measure. . . . We experience [her characters''] interiority almost as naturally as our own, and respond to it emotionally, intellectually, even spiritually. Robinson''s latest collection, Absence of Mind, gets to the hear of that creative force, while reminding us what little heed she pays intellectual fashion."—Stefan Beck, The New Criterion

— Stefan Beck

Michael Dirda
…these impassioned pages require and reward very close attention.
—The Washington Post
The Barnes & Noble Review

The much-admired Marilynne Robinson, best known for her two recent theologically-minded novels (Gilead , 2004, and Home, 2008), assays some straightforward religious thinking in Absence of Mind, a dense and challenging short work, originally delivered as a lecture series at Yale. Robinson’s sharp reasoning goes directly to the heart of the current debate between the neo-Darwinian atheists and those, like Robinson, who hope to preserve our sense of self and soul. She wisely ignores the distracting "religion versus science" argument and locates the origins of the present-day conflict in a wider philosophical frame. Post-enlightenment positivism encouraged thinkers to believe that metaphysics was outdated, and that specific material forces could account for human behavior. If Marx posited an economic base, Freud would argue for the importance of the unconscious; such reductive thinking became the hallmark of modern thought. In more recent days, neurologists have claimed to locate all human activity in specific areas of our brains, while evolutionary biologists have found explanations for behavior in some kind of programmatic nature. All these theories rely, in Robinson’s words, on the same sort of parascientific reasoning. Her discussions of well-known neurologists, biologists, and psychologists -- from Richard Dawkins and Antonio Damasio to Steven Pinker and Daniel Dennett -- are trenchant, and often devastatingly on target. She gets to the heart of the matter -- and that heart, she finds, is one with our soul, that dimension of ourselves that defies material explanation.

Don’t mistake this brief but challenging book for an anti-scientific jeremiad. Quite the contrary, for Robinson admires all that genuine science continues to offer us. What she rejects is the intellectual arrogance of overly deterministic thought. Her wonderful defense of an expansive self in a diminishing age deserves a wide readership -- among other virtues, it is the perfect antidote to all those pop atheist screeds.

--Thomas De Pietro

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780300145182
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication date: 5/25/2010
  • Series: Terry Lectures Series
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 577,900
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Marilynne Robinson

Marilynne Robinson is the author of Gilead, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for fiction; Home, winner of the 2009 Orange Prize for Fiction; and Housekeeping, winner of the 1982 Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award for first fiction. She is also the author of two previous books of nonfiction, Mother Country and The Death of Adam. She teaches at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop and lives in Iowa City.

Biography

For someone who has labored long in the literary vineyard, Marilynne Robinson has produced a remarkably slim oeuvre. However, in this case, quality clearly trumps quantity. Her 1980 debut, Housekeeping, snagged the PEN/Hemingway Award for best first novel and was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Twenty-four years later, her follow-up novel, Gilead, won the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Ambassador Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize. And in between, her controversial extended essay Mother Country: Britain, the Welfare State and Nuclear Pollution (1989) was shortlisted for the National Book Award.

Robinson is far from indolent. She teaches at several colleges and has written several articles for Harper's, Paris Review, The New York Times Book Review, and other publications. Still, one wonders -- especially in the face of her great critical acclaim -- why she hasn't produced more full-length works. When asked about these extended periods of literary dormancy, Robinson told Barnes & Noble.com, "I feel as if I have to locate my own thinking landscape... I have to do that by reading -- basically trying to get outside the set of assumptions that sometimes seems so small or inappropriate to me." What that entails is working through various ideas that often don't develop because, as she says, "I couldn't love them."

Still, occasionally Robinson is able to salvage something important from the detritus -- for example, Gilead's central character, Reverend John Ames. "I was just working on a piece of fiction that I had been fiddling with," Robinson explains. "There was a character whom I intended as a minor character... he was a minister, and he had written a little poem, and he transformed himself, and he became quite different -- he became the narrator. I suddenly knew a great deal about him that was very different from what I assumed when I created him as a character in the first place."

This tendency of Robinson's to regard her characters as living, thinking beings may help to explain why her fictional output is so small. While some authors feel a deep compulsion to write daily, approaching writing as a job, Robinson depends on inspiration which often comes from the characters themselves. She explains, "I have to have a narrator whose voice tells me what to do -- whose voice tells me how to write the novel."

As if to prove her point, in 2008, Robinson crafted the luminous novel Home around secondary characters from Gilead: John Ames's closest friend, Reverend Robert Boughton, his daughter Glory, and his reprobate son Jack. Paying Robinson the ultimate compliment, Kirkus Reviews declared that the novel "[c]omes astonishingly close to matching its amazing predecessor in beauty and power."

However, the deeply spiritual Robinson is motivated by a more personal directive than the desire for critical praise or bestsellerdom. Like the writing of Willa Cather -- or, more contemporaneously, Annie Dillard -- her novels are suffused with themes of faith, atonement, and redemption. She equates writing to prayer because "it's exploratory and you engage in it in the hope of having another perspective or seeing beyond what is initially obvious or apparent to you." To this sentiment, Robinson's many devoted fans can only add: Amen.

Good To Know

Robinson doesn't just address religion in her writing. She serves as a deacon at the Congregational Church to which she belongs.

One might think that winning a Pulitzer Prize could easily go to a writer's head, but Robinson continues to approach her work with surprising humility. In fact, her advice to aspiring writers is to always "assume your readers are smarter than you are."

Robinson is no stranger to controversy. Mother Country, her indictment of the destruction of the environment and those who feign to protect it, has raised the ire of Greenpeace, which attempted to sue her British publisher for libel.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Iowa City, Iowa
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 26, 1943
    2. Place of Birth:
      Sandpoint, Idaho
    1. Education:
      B.A., Brown University, 1966

Table of Contents

Introduction ix

Chapter 1 On Human Nature 1

Chapter 2 The Strange History of Altruism 31

Chapter 3 The Freudian Self 77

Chapter 4 Thinking Again 109

Notes 137

Bibliography 141

Index 145

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2013

    .

    .

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 22, 2011

    One of today's great public intellectuals

    Marilynne Robinson is one of today's great public intellectuals. Her published works are few in number but their substance outweighs just about anyone else who writes on serious topics. One of the reasons for that is her honesty in having actually read and studied what she comments on. It's a mark of how far in decline Anglo American culture is that the basic fact of serious scholarship, knowing what you're talking about, is considered a distinction. Absence of Mind is a series of essays that take on some of the big topics, evolutionary psychology, cognitive science, etc. and the intellectual umbrella for them, materialism. The central essay, which takes on the materialist treatment of altruism is one of the greatest English language essays in many years. It's worth noting that E. O. Wilson, himself, has been walking away from Hamilton's odd form of selfish-altruism in the period since it was first given, much to the horror of those for whom it is one of their articles of materialist faith. By the end of the book Robinson has done an excellent job of establishing that instead of science amassing a body of evidence that leads inevitably to materialism, an ideological effort aping the form and language of science is inventing that evidence out of materialist dogma. As in so many things online, ideologues of materialism try to slant ratings in ways more explicitly seen in Sarah Palin's fans altering the Paul Revere article in Wikipedia. It might work temporarily to induce superficial people to not pick up the book but superficial people probably wouldn't have stayed with it anyway. In some of the online commentary on excerpts of Absence of Mind the idea that her sentences are too long seems to be intended as an absolute refutation of its value. But silly people can't undo what she has done. This is a magnificent book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    This is one of our most forceful, convincing commentators on the impact of Christianity on society. And here she takes on the myths that drive "science"-based thought against religion.

    A different and equally powerful commentary, touching both liberal and conservative views of our times is found in The Death of Adam, especially in the included essay on Puritans and Prigs.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)