Abuela's Weave

Abuela's Weave

by Omar S. Castaneda, Enrique O. Sanchez, Omar S. Castaaneda
     
 

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Esperanza's Abuela, her grandmother, is unmatched in her skill in weaving traditional Mayan tapestries. She has shared her gift with her granddaughter, and now they plan to sell their goods at the market. However, the birthmark on Abuela's face may scare customers away. So Esperanza must cope with the city streets and find buyers alone. This touching story of personal…  See more details below

Overview

Esperanza's Abuela, her grandmother, is unmatched in her skill in weaving traditional Mayan tapestries. She has shared her gift with her granddaughter, and now they plan to sell their goods at the market. However, the birthmark on Abuela's face may scare customers away. So Esperanza must cope with the city streets and find buyers alone. This touching story of personal growth and family pride is illustrated with authentic Guatemalan scenery that gives life to the country's radiant landscape and bustling city streets.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
According to PW, this story set in Guatemala ``affectingly portrays the loving rapport between a child and her grandmother.'' Ages 3-9. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
A Guatemalan grandmother and her grandchild weave intricate tapestries of their country's rich past. They weave their lives together with threads of dreams, hopes, and intergenerational love. However, they both fear failure in the marketplace because of the grandmother's birthmark which has branded her as a witch in their small village. In the end, the weave of relationship and cloth bring them through their fear and separation to success. The illustrations are a whirl of color and emotion.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-- Castaneda's rich narrative effectively evokes the harmonious way of life of many Indian communities in Latin America. Esperanza is learning to weave on the backstrap loom from her grandmother. `` `Pull back hard,' old Abuela said. `Make it jolt, so the threads stay close, like family.' '' The whole family counts on them to sell their tapestries at the Fiesta de Pueblos in Guate . However, more and more machine-made weavings are appearing at markets and many people are fearful of the elderly woman, thinking she is a witch because of the birthmark on her face. The day of the fiesta, Abuela dresses all in black with a long shawl wrapped around her face to hide the birthmark. She walks a few paces behind her granddaughter, pretending they don't know each other. Their fears disappear, however, when people crowd around their display of complex weavings amid the commercial stalls. Sanchez's illustrations rendered in acrylic on canvas vividly capture the importance of this ``rite of initiation'' for a young girl under the lovingly firm guidance of her grandmother. Color and composition on each page authentically re-create images of rural Guatemala. A book to be read independently and enjoyed by all children.-- Graciela Italiano, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781880000205
Publisher:
Lee & Low Books, Inc.
Publication date:
04/01/2013
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
599,227
Product dimensions:
7.79(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.13(d)
Lexile:
AD960L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 9 Years

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