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Academic Writing

Overview

Contemporary research into written academic discourse has become increasingly polarised between two approaches: corpus linguistics and discourse analysis.  This volume presents a selection of recent work by experts in academic written discourse, and illustrates how corpus linguistics and discourse analysis can work as complementary approaches.

 

The overall introduction sets the volume against the backdrop of current work in English for Academic Purposes, and ...

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Overview

Contemporary research into written academic discourse has become increasingly polarised between two approaches: corpus linguistics and discourse analysis.  This volume presents a selection of recent work by experts in academic written discourse, and illustrates how corpus linguistics and discourse analysis can work as complementary approaches.

 

The overall introduction sets the volume against the backdrop of current work in English for Academic Purposes, and introductions to the each section draw out connections between the chapters and put them into context. The contributors are experts in the field and they cover both novice and expert examples of EAP.  The book ends with an afterword that provides an agenda-setting closing perspective on the future of EAP research.

 

It will appeal to reserachers and postgrduates in applied linguistics, corpus linguistics, discourse analysis and EAP.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847064363
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 12/1/2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 316
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Maggie Charles is Tutor in English for Academic Studies at Oxford University Language Centre, Oxford, UK.

Susan Hunston is Professor of English Language at the University of Birmingham, UK.

Diane Pecorari is a Senior Lecturer and Coordinator of English in the Department of Modern Languages, Mälardalen University, Sweden.

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Table of Contents

Exploring the interface between corpus linguistics and discourse analysis Maggie Charles, Diane Pecorari and Susan Hunston Part I. Focus on Genre and Disciplinary Discourses Introduction to Part I Maggie Charles 1. Schematic structure and lexico-grammatical realization in corpus-based genre analysis: The case of ‘research’ in the PhD literature review, John Flowerdew (Leeds University, UK) & Richard Forest (Central Michigan University, USA) 2. Persuading sponsors and securing funding: Rhetorical patterns in grant proposals, Dimitra Koutsantoni (City University, UK) 3. Verbal and mental processes in academic disciplines, Jasper Holmes (Warwick University, UK) & Hilary Nesi (Coventry University, UK) 4. In the wake of the Terror: Phraseological tools of time setting in the narrative of history, Marina Bondi (University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy) 5. Formulaic language in biology: A topic-specific investigation, Diane Pecorari (Mälardalen University, Sweden) Part II. Focus on Interpersonal Discourses Introduction to Part II Susan Hunston 6. Corpus informed discourse analysis: The case of academic engagement, Ken Hyland (Institute of Education, London University, UK) 7. E-conferencing: Corpus and discourse insights, Ann Hewings, Caroline Coffin & Sarah North (The Open University, UK) 8. Stance, interaction and the rhetorical patterns of restrictive adverbs: Discourse roles of only, just, simply and merely, Maggie Charles (Oxford University, UK) 9. A dialogic account of authority in academic writing, Ramona Tang (National Institute of Education, Singapore) Part III. Focus on Learner Discourses Introduction to Part III Diane Pecorari 10. Lexical verbs in academic discourse: A corpus-driven study of learner use, Sylviane Granger & Magali Paquot (Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium) 11. Linking adverbials in student and professional writing in literary studies: What makes writing mature, Philip Shaw (Stockholm University, Sweden) 12. Variation in the writing of economics students in Britain and Pakistan: the case of conjunctive ties, Amina Gardezi (Beaconhouse National University, Lahore, Pakistan & Hilary Nesi (Coventry University, UK) 13. Can I use headings in my essay? Section headings, macrostructures and genre families in the BAWE corpus of student writing, Sheena Gardner (University of Birmingham, UK) & Jasper Holmes (Warwick University, UK) 14. Using the revision process to help international students understand the linguistic construction of the academic identity, Suganthi John (Birmingham University, UK) Afterword John Swales(University of Michigan, USA) Index.

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