Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives
  • Alternative view 1 of Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives
  • Alternative view 2 of Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives
  • Alternative view 3 of Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives
  • Alternative view 4 of Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives
  • Alternative view 5 of Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives
<Previous >Next

Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives

5.0 1
by Birgit Krols
     
 
It’s hard to imagine a world without Coca-Cola, Post-its, or Velcro, but have you ever stopped to wonder how and when these items came to be? Accidental Inventions reveals the fascinating stories behind the toys, foods, gadgets, and tools we now consider indispensable. From peanut butter to penicillin, roller skates to radioactivity, dozens of essential

Overview

It’s hard to imagine a world without Coca-Cola, Post-its, or Velcro, but have you ever stopped to wonder how and when these items came to be? Accidental Inventions reveals the fascinating stories behind the toys, foods, gadgets, and tools we now consider indispensable. From peanut butter to penicillin, roller skates to radioactivity, dozens of essential inventions are spotlighted. Fully illustrated with over 240 photos, Accidental Inventions traces the path from inception to “ah ha!” for more than 60 products, and introduces the cast of clever, hardworking inventors behind them. Engaging narrative and colorful design make these stories accessible to readers of all ages, illuminating the happy collision of accident and inspiration that would profoundly change our lives.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Filled with amusing pictures and quotes, this coffee-table book purports to give the background on dozens of inventions now in common use. Krols (Bimbos and Machos), a film journalist and magazine editor, has collected tales that span the millennia about unintentional lucky results of experiments. The stories of tea, cheese, and maple syrup are admittedly more legend than fact, while others, such as dynamite and Viagra, are easily substantiated elsewhere. While entries for LSD, the popsicle, and the hot-air balloon are entertaining and informative (to the extent that they provide fodder for fun facts), the lack of citations, or even a bibliography, means that the reader must do further research to verify their accuracy—17th-century abstract tantric painters of Rajasthan, India would likely take issue with Krols' dubious assertion that Wassily Kandinsky invented "Abstract Art" in 1910. A fun starting place for further inquiry, Krols' latest will be best suited to curious kids whose parents can help them sort fact from fiction. Photos. (Apr.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781608870738
Publisher:
Insight Editions
Publication date:
04/17/2012
Pages:
168
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 7.10(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Birgit Krols is a former film journalist who earned her living interviewing international movie stars before becoming editor-in-chief of a city lifestyle magazine. The author of several books, Krols lives in Antwerp, Belgium.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Read-by-Glowlight More than 1 year ago
Fascinating, Educational, and Inspiring &ldquo;In 1827, the British chemist John Walker was trying to create a new explosive by mixing antimony sulfide and potassium chlorate, when he was called away from his laboratory. Upon his return, he noticed that the mixture had formed a hard lump on the stirrer. When he tried to remove it by scraping it over the floor, he was astonished to see the whole thing catch fire. The matchstick was born!&rdquo; (p. 112) Accidental Inventions: The Chance Discoveries That Changed Our Lives, by Birgit Krols is as entertaining as it is informative. Each page is filled with a large, glossy, colorful photographs that make the book fun to look at. Then on the opposite page is the short story of how the invention came to be, along with pertinent facts and statistics. For example, John Walker refused to patent the matchstick, for humanitarian reasons. Curious about how many matches are used every year? The answer is about 500 billion. In the section for &ldquo;Entertainment,&rdquo; we read about Play-Doh, roller skates, the Frisbee, and more. Under &ldquo;Food and Drink,&rdquo; we learn the origin of 17 items, including the Popsicle, chocolate chip cookies, the tea bag, and brandy. &ldquo;Medicine&rdquo; includes x-rays, LSD, and Band-Aids. My personal favorite is &ldquo;Everyday Life&rdquo; which tells about Post-its, the flashlight, rear-view mirrors, guide dogs, and much more. I found it humorous that women wrote into the Kleenex company complaining that their make-up remover tissues were being used by their husbands and sons to blow their noses. These complaints segued into an &ldquo;aha moment&rdquo; for Kleenex, who then launched a new marketing angle and greatly increased their sales. The book wraps up with &ldquo;Substances,&rdquo; giving the history of TNT, radioactivity, Scotchgard and more. One truth that becomes clear is that accidents can turn into terrific ideas. Another is that looking at something in a different way can be life-changing. These are both good perspectives to teach to children and teens, and I think they would enjoy the book as much as adults. I have to add that the appearance of the cover and every page is spectacular, so a person could use this as a coffee table book and a conversation-starter when they&rsquo;ve finished reading it. I&rsquo;ll conclude with one of the quotation on page 50, made by American President Rutherford B. Hayes: &ldquo;An amazing invention&mdash;but who would ever want to use one?&rdquo; He was talking to Alexander Graham bell about his telephone. If you enjoyed Hayes&rsquo; quote, if you like short, fascinating clips of history along with gorgeous photographs, you&rsquo;ll love this book. I highly recommend it, both for yourself and as a gift.