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Oxford Bookworms Library: The Accidental Tourist: Level 5: 1,800 Word Vocabulary / Edition 3
     

Oxford Bookworms Library: The Accidental Tourist: Level 5: 1,800 Word Vocabulary / Edition 3

3.8 40
by Anne Tyler
 

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ISBN-10: 0194792153

ISBN-13: 9780194792158

Pub. Date: 01/28/2009

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

This award-winning collection of adapted classic literature and original stories develops reading skills for low-beginning through advanced students.

Accessible language and carefully controlled vocabulary build students' reading confidence.

Introductions at the beginning of each story, illustrations throughout, and glossaries help build comprehension.

Before

Overview

This award-winning collection of adapted classic literature and original stories develops reading skills for low-beginning through advanced students.

Accessible language and carefully controlled vocabulary build students' reading confidence.

Introductions at the beginning of each story, illustrations throughout, and glossaries help build comprehension.

Before, during, and after reading activities included in the back of each book strengthen student comprehension.

Audio versions of selected titles provide great models of intonation and pronunciation of difficult words.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780194792158
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
01/28/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.70(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile:
630L (what's this?)

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The Accidental Tourist 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
MacPoster More than 1 year ago
I read this about 20 years ago and recall it as a powerful, insightful book. Just over a year ago I lost a son, and so this year I decided to plunge back in, expecting comfort, connection via fiction, a new way of coming to understanding. Instead I found myself saying over and over again to myself, "Sorry Ms. Tyler, you missed that too." The plot seems forced, the love affair between the mourning father and his new girlfriend cliche, and the ending too easy and predictable. More than that, sorry, but as an act of imagination, it simply doesn't get close to the confusion and pain of this kind of grief, at least for me. As ever with Tyler's writing, though, it is well-crafted. But the humaneness and wisdom I once thought this book contained turns out, now that I've experienced something like what she tries to convey, as shallow and failed empathy. The characters and emotions became to me, in the end, contrivances, not real, and given the subject matter she was attempting too confront, not true enough by half.
adamgn More than 1 year ago
I had high hopes for this book, but it did not meet them. As I read, I kept thinking it would get better; that something would earn my interest -- it never did. To me it felt like Tyler couldn't decide whether to write her characters as caricatures or purely boring beings. So in the end, it felt like an awful mixture of people who made no sense whatsoever. The worst was that the characters would suddenly have wonderful insights into life (i.e., when Macon felt Muriel's cesarian scar), which made no sense since no one in the book seemed to be functioning on any rationally thinking level at any other moment in the book. Ultimately, the characters were so poorly written that I couldn't even gain interest in the story, which had a lot of potential in my opinion. It felt like a poor-man's version of Annie Proulx's The Shipping News, which is remarkably better on all fronts. Perhaps I shouldn't compare because they are slightly different, but that was all I could think about the entire time I read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book for my English class this year, and it has stuck with me ever since. Anne Tyler's characters are well-developed and quirky, and the plot is very moving. This book definitely made me stop and thing about my own life and how I'm choosing to live it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Macon is someone that I could never like in real life. He is boring, stodgy, and does not engage in the world around him. He better stick with Muriel since she is his only chance of leaving his grey sweats behind. It was hard to get through this book.
Anonymous 7 months ago
TulaneGirl 8 months ago
Macon and Sarah Leary have been married for 20 years when tragedy strikes them. Being such different people doesn't serve them well during the grieving process. Neither can be what the other needs during their time of need. While driving home in the rain, Sarah asks Macon to pull over because of her rising anxiety over driving in the torrential rain. When he refuses, she asks for a divorce. Macon is at a loss. He thought they were trucking along as best as they could considering their son was just brutally murdered. *All this is revealed chapter 1 so it's not really a spoiler* What follows is Macon's journey of discovery. He's a travel writer who caters to the traveler that wants to know where the American hotels and McDonald's are when they travel to Timbuktu. Wait, his reader would never travel to Timbuktu - to Prague, then. He revels in the comforts of routine and consistency. He is a passive man who allows life to happen to him. He was an obedient child, grew up into a steady man, married the first girl he was ever with and takes comfort in having an orderly life. All this is destroyed when Sarah leaves him. He must learn who to be without her defining him. Enter Muriel - headstrong and lively, Muriel. She tenaciously pursues him and teaches him to step outside himself - to consider something other than everything he's ever done and known. In the end, Macon must do something he's never done before - make a choice. Frankly, I think he made the wrong choice, but hey, that's what happens when you're not used to making choices.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Dashford More than 1 year ago
Although I did enjoy the book, I most likely would not have read it if I had known it was a "sit around and discuss the implications/impact it had" kind of book. I mostly like to read for entertainment and this is more of a sit and think about it kind of book. Great if you like that kind of read.
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