Acorns Everywhere

Acorns Everywhere

4.0 2
by Kevin Sherry
     
 

His giant squid stole our hearts. His orange squirrel will steal our...acorns?!

Bonk! When an acorn hits him on the head, a chubby squirrel takes stock. And what does he see? ACORNS EVERYWHERE! With a jolt of hilarious manic energy, he gets to work-Gather! Dig! Bury! Readers will know, even if the squirrel doesn't, that 'gather' does not mean prying acorns from

Overview

His giant squid stole our hearts. His orange squirrel will steal our...acorns?!

Bonk! When an acorn hits him on the head, a chubby squirrel takes stock. And what does he see? ACORNS EVERYWHERE! With a jolt of hilarious manic energy, he gets to work-Gather! Dig! Bury! Readers will know, even if the squirrel doesn't, that 'gather' does not mean prying acorns from the mouth of a scandalized mouse, the beak of an unsuspecting bird, or . . . well, you'll see. Will this squirrel get what's coming to him-or will he get something even better?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
04/27/2015
It is a truth universally acknowledged that squirrels obsessively bury nuts and then promptly forget where they put them. Sherry's (I'm the Biggest Thing in the Ocean) comically frenetic cartooning is ideally suited to this premise, and he heightens the totemic desirability of the acorns by rendering them in photographic cutouts ("I must hide them," the wide-eyed squirrel says, staring at readers with the utmost seriousness and intensity). But while Sherry's bold colors, large-scale images and exclamatory text have lots of get-up-and-go ("Gather! Dig! Bury!" is the squirrel's refrain as he nabs acorns from other creatures), the story devolves into a lame homophonic joke: for a second, it looks like a large brown bear might just "bury" the squirrel, but it turns out he's just after a "berry" snack of his own. The squirrel then abruptly decides that those are just fine for sating his appetite, too, and his cycle of thievery restarts. Ages 3—5. (Sept.)
Booklist
A nice, concise tale of making the best of what you've got.
Children's Literature - Summer Whiting
This big, orange squirrel is getting ready for winter. His mantra, "gather, dig, bury," almost gets him into trouble with a looming brown bear. The bear hears the word "berry" while the squirrel is simply trying to motivate himself into "burying" as many acorns as he possibly can. What a close call! The squirrel is relieved to see him indulge in the blackberries, and not in squirrel. Squirrel's belly begins to rumble. It is time to eat but he is baffled as to where he buried the nuts. Being hungry, he wastes no time and simply makes his way over to the blackberries, much to the other creature's dismay. He will not need any acorns for a long while. He fills his belly with enough blackberries to last him through winter. This picture book will be a delight for young readers. There are few words on each page, which will enable children to build their sight word vocabulary. The artwork was created using cut paper, watercolor and ink layered on Plexiglas. It creates a vibrant and engaging presentation. Reviewer: Summer Whiting
School Library Journal
PreS-K—A mischievous squirrel gathers acorns, sometimes stealing them from other forest creatures, and buries them in various spots. After a scary encounter with a bear, who only wants some berries growing nearby, the squirrel can't seem to recall where he put his supply. When the squirrel's tummy starts to grumble, berries plundered from some indignant rats provide a welcome snack. The rats get their due on the back endpapers when they pinch the squirrel's acorns from their hiding places. Like the rats, young children will enjoy getting one over on the cheeky squirrel. Oversize cut-paper and ink cartoons, interspersed with photographic images of acorns and berries, tell much of the story, making the one-word to one-sentence lines of text per spread almost unnecessary. While the book is not as original as Sherry's I'm the Biggest Thing in the Ocean (2007) and I'm the Best Artist in the Ocean (2008, both Dial), this bright orange squirrel will entertain children.—Rachel G. Payne, Brooklyn Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Sherry forgoes his signature squid, introduced in I'm the Biggest Thing in the Ocean (2007), for an outrageous squirrel and its acorn obsession. To a mantra of "gather, dig, bury," the frantic rodent collects all possible nuts, his diminutive arms yanking the food from the bird and mice nearby. As astute onlookers observe, the gatherer misplaces his buried bounty, but a rumbling forest giant provides an unlikely treasure for the forgetful forager. Repetitive phrases move the spare narrative along; the minimal text gives space for the purposeful cartoons to tell the tale. Pacing builds to a genuinely funny if entirely predictable-to squirrel behaviorists, anyway-conclusion. Cut-paper and collaged photograph accents present a striking focal point against a mostly sky-blue watercolor backdrop for the solid landscape. Bold, black lines and solid colors suit the stocky scavenger's frenzied attitude. His tiny pupils accentuate each wide-eyed expression, his single white tooth a glaring contrast to his orange face. Each upright character is disproportionately featured, maintaining the focus on the zany antics. A light forest romp. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803732568
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/17/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD870L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Kevin Sherry lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Acorns Everywhere 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
book4children More than 1 year ago
Acorns Everywhere is an absolutely hilarious book about a squirrel frantically collecting acorns from every source he can find...including the paws and beaks of other animals. He spends so much time gathering, digging, and burying, that when he gets hungry, he isn't quite sure where he put them all. So he has to settle for something else instead. My only concern with this book was the way the squirrel grabbed acorns from other animals. But it did give me a good opportunity to talk with my kids about sharing and making sure we don't grab things from other people because it makes them angry or sad.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago