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Active Directory: Designing, Deploying, and Running Active Directory

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Organize your network resources by learning how to design, manage, and maintain Active Directory. Updated to cover Windows Server 2012, the fifth edition of this bestselling book gives you a thorough grounding in Microsoft’s network directory service by explaining concepts in an easy-to-understand, narrative style.

You’ll negotiate a maze of technologies for deploying a scalable and reliable AD infrastructure, with new chapters on management tools, searching the AD database, ...

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Overview

Organize your network resources by learning how to design, manage, and maintain Active Directory. Updated to cover Windows Server 2012, the fifth edition of this bestselling book gives you a thorough grounding in Microsoft’s network directory service by explaining concepts in an easy-to-understand, narrative style.

You’ll negotiate a maze of technologies for deploying a scalable and reliable AD infrastructure, with new chapters on management tools, searching the AD database, authentication and security protocols, and Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS). This book provides real-world scenarios that let you apply what you’ve learned—ideal whether you’re a network administrator for a small business or a multinational enterprise.

  • Upgrade Active Directory to Windows Server 2012
  • Learn the fundamentals, including how AD stores objects
  • Use the AD Administrative Center and other management tools
  • Learn to administer AD with Windows PowerShell
  • Search and gather AD data, using the LDAP query syntax
  • Understand how Group Policy functions
  • Design a new Active Directory forest
  • Examine the Kerberos security protocol
  • Get a detailed look at the AD replication process
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596520595
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/3/2008
  • Edition description: Fourth Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 866
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 2.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian Desmond spends his days focused on Active Directory for some of the world's largest companies. A Microsoft MVP since 2004, Brian brings extensive knowledge of how Active Directory works and how to successfully run Active Directory deployments large and small.

Joe Richards is a consultant / admin / tool writer who happens to have a secret identity as a Microsoft MVP for Windows Server Directory Services.His specialty is Directory Services but has "minors" in Security and Active Directory programming. By day he works for a large services/consulting/manufacturing company. He takes time to chat with people on listservs and newsgroups, write about stuff he knows, and whips up various fairly useful tools.

Robbie Allen is a technical leader at Cisco Systems, where he has been involved in the deployment of Active Directory, DNS, DHCP, and several network management solutions. Robbie was named a Windows Server MVP in 2004 and 2005 for his contributions to the Windows community and the publication of several popular O'Reilly books. Robbie is currently studying at MIT in its system design and management program. For more information, see Robbie's web site at www.rallenhome.com.

Alistair G. Lowe-Norris is an Architectural Enterprise Strategy Consultant for Microsoft UK. He worked for Leicester University as the project manager and technical lead of the Rapid Deployment Program for Windows 2000, responsible for rolling out one of the world's largest deployments of Windows 2000 preceding release of the final product. Since 1998 he has been the technical editor and a monthly columnist for the Windows Scripting Solutions magazine and a technical editor and author for Windows & .NET Magazine (previously Windows NT Magazine and Windows 2000 Magazine).

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Table of Contents

Preface; Intended Audience; Contents of the Book; Conventions Used in This Book; Using Code Examples; Safari® Books Online; How to Contact Us; Acknowledgments; Active Directory Basics; Chapter 1: A Brief Introduction; 1.1 Evolution of the Microsoft NOS; 1.2 Windows NT Versus Active Directory; 1.3 Windows 2000 Versus Windows Server 2003; 1.4 Windows Server 2003 Versus Windows Server 2003 R2; 1.5 Windows Server 2003 R2 Versus Windows Server 2008; 1.6 Summary; Chapter 2: Active Directory Fundamentals; 2.1 How Objects Are Stored and Identified; 2.2 Building Blocks; 2.3 Summary; Chapter 3: Naming Contexts and Application Partitions; 3.1 Domain Naming Context; 3.2 Configuration Naming Context; 3.3 Schema Naming Context; 3.4 Application Partitions; 3.5 Summary; Chapter 4: Active Directory Schema; 4.1 Structure of the Schema; 4.2 Attributes (attributeSchema Objects); 4.3 Attribute Properties; 4.4 Classes (classSchema Objects); 4.5 Summary; Chapter 5: Site Topology and Replication; 5.1 Site Topology; 5.2 How Replication Works; 5.3 Summary; Chapter 6: Active Directory and DNS; 6.1 DNS Fundamentals; 6.2 DC Locator; 6.3 Resource Records Used by Active Directory; 6.4 Delegation Options; 6.5 Active Directory Integrated DNS; 6.6 Using Application Partitions for DNS; 6.7 Aging and Scavenging; 6.8 Summary; Chapter 7: Read-Only Domain Controllers; 7.1 Prerequisites; 7.2 Password Replication Policies; 7.3 The Client Logon Process; 7.4 RODCs and Write Requests; 7.5 The W32Time Service; 7.6 Application Compatibility; 7.7 RODC Placement Considerations; 7.8 RODCs and Replication; 7.9 Administrator Role Separation; 7.10 Summary; Chapter 8: Group Policy Primer; 8.1 Capabilities of GPOs; 8.2 How Group Policies Work; 8.3 Managing Group Policies; 8.4 Troubleshooting Group Policy; 8.5 Summary; Chapter 9: Fine-Grained Password Policies; 9.1 Understanding Password Setting Objects; 9.2 Scenarios for Fine-Grained Password Policies; 9.3 Creating Password Setting Objects; 9.4 Managing Password Settings Objects; 9.5 Delegating Management of PSOs; 9.6 Summary; Designing an Active Directory Infrastructure; Chapter 10: Designing the Namespace; 10.1 The Complexities of a Design; 10.2 Where to Start; 10.3 Overview of the Design Process; 10.4 Domain Namespace Design; 10.5 Design of the Internal Domain Structure; 10.6 Other Design Considerations; 10.7 Design Examples; 10.8 Designing for the Real World; 10.9 Summary; Chapter 11: Creating a Site Topology; 11.1 Intrasite and Intersite Topologies; 11.2 Designing Sites and Links for Replication; 11.3 Examples; 11.4 Additional Resources; 11.5 Summary; Chapter 12: Designing Organization-Wide Group Policies; 12.1 Using GPOs to Help Design the Organizational Unit Structure; 12.2 Summary; Chapter 13: Active Directory Security: Permissions and Auditing; 13.1 Permission Basics; 13.2 Using the GUI to Examine Permissions; 13.3 Using the GUI to Examine Auditing; 13.4 Designing Permission Schemes; 13.5 Designing Auditing Schemes; 13.6 Real-World Examples; 13.7 Summary; Chapter 14: Designing and Implementing Schema Extensions; 14.1 Nominating Responsible People in Your Organization; 14.2 Thinking of Changing the Schema; 14.3 Creating Schema Extensions; 14.4 Summary; Chapter 15: Backup, Recovery, and Maintenance; 15.1 Backing Up Active Directory; 15.2 Restoring a Domain Controller; 15.3 Restoring Active Directory; 15.4 Working with Snapshots; 15.5 FSMO Recovery; 15.6 Restartable Directory Service; 15.7 DIT Maintenance; 15.8 Summary; Chapter 16: Upgrading to Windows Server 2003; 16.1 New Features in Windows Server 2003; 16.2 Differences with Windows 2000; 16.3 Functional Levels Explained; 16.4 Preparing for ADPrep; 16.5 Upgrade Process; 16.6 Post-Upgrade Tasks; 16.7 Summary; Chapter 17: Upgrading to Windows Server 2003 R2; 17.1 New Active Directory Features in Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1; 17.2 Differences with Windows Server 2003; 17.3 New Active Directory Features in Windows Server 2003 R2; 17.4 Preparing for ADPrep; 17.5 Service Pack 1 Upgrade Process; 17.6 R2 Upgrade Process; 17.7 Summary; Chapter 18: Upgrading to Windows Server 2008; 18.1 New Features in Windows Server 2008; 18.2 Differences with Windows Server 2003; 18.3 Preparing for ADPrep; 18.4 Windows Server 2008 Upgrade Process; 18.5 Summary; Chapter 19: Integrating Microsoft Exchange; 19.1 A Quick Word about Exchange/AD Interaction; 19.2 Preparing Active Directory for Exchange; 19.3 Mail-Enabling Objects; 19.4 Summary; Chapter 20: Active Directory Lightweight Directory Service (a.k.a. ADAM); 20.1 ADAM Terms; 20.2 Differences Between AD and ADAM V1.0; 20.3 ADAM R2 Updates; 20.4 Active Directory Lightweight Directory Services Updates; 20.5 AD LDS Installation; 20.6 Tools; 20.7 ADAM Schema; 20.8 Using ADAM; 20.9 Summary; Scripting Active Directory with ADSI, ADO, and WMI; Chapter 21: Scripting with ADSI; 21.1 What Are All These Buzzwords?; 21.2 ADSI; 21.3 Simple Manipulation of ADSI Objects; 21.4 Summary; Chapter 22: IADs and the Property Cache; 22.1 The IADs Properties; 22.2 Manipulating the Property Cache; 22.3 Checking for Errors in VBScript; 22.4 Summary; Chapter 23: Using ADO for Searching; 23.1 The First Search; 23.2 Understanding Search Filters; 23.3 Optimizing Searches; 23.4 Advanced Search Function: SearchAD; 23.5 Summary; Chapter 24: Users and Groups; 24.1 Creating a Simple User Account; 24.2 Creating a Full-Featured User Account; 24.3 Creating Many User Accounts; 24.4 Modifying Many User Accounts; 24.5 Account Unlocker Utility; 24.6 Creating a Group; 24.7 Adding Members to a Group; 24.8 Evaluating Group Membership; 24.9 Summary; Chapter 25: Permissions and Auditing; 25.1 How to Create an ACE Using ADSI; 25.2 A Simple ADSI Example; 25.3 A Complex ADSI Example; 25.4 Creating Security Descriptors; 25.5 Listing the Security Descriptor of an Object; 25.6 Summary; Chapter 26: Extending the Schema and the Active Directory Snap-ins; 26.1 Modifying the Schema with ADSI; 26.2 Customizing the Active Directory Administrative Snap-ins; 26.3 Summary; Chapter 27: Scripting with WMI; 27.1 Origins of WMI; 27.2 WMI Architecture; 27.3 Getting Started with WMI Scripting; 27.4 WMI Tools; 27.5 Manipulating Services; 27.6 Querying the Event Logs; 27.7 Monitoring Trusts; 27.8 Monitoring Replication; 27.9 Summary; Chapter 28: Scripting DNS; 28.1 DNS Provider Overview; 28.2 Manipulating DNS Server Configuration; 28.3 Creating and Manipulating Zones; 28.4 Creating and Manipulating Resource Records; 28.5 Summary; Chapter 29: Programming the Directory with the .NET Framework; 29.1 Why .NET?; 29.2 Choosing a .NET Programming Language; 29.3 Choosing a Development Tool; 29.4 .NET Framework Versions; 29.5 Directory Services Programming Landscape; 29.6 .NET Directory Services Programming by Example; 29.7 Summary; Chapter 30: PowerShell Basics; 30.1 Exploring the PowerShell; 30.2 Working with the Pipeline; 30.3 Cmdlets; 30.4 Building PowerShell Scripts; 30.5 Using WMI; 30.6 Summary; Chapter 31: Scripting Active Directory with PowerShell; 31.1 Becoming Familiar with .NET; 31.2 Understanding Client-Side Processing; 31.3 Building the Lab Build Script; 31.4 Working with Forests and Domains; 31.5 Understanding Group Policy; 31.6 Summary; Chapter 32: Scripting Basic Exchange 2003 Tasks; 32.1 Notes on Managing Exchange; 32.2 Exchange Management Tools; 32.3 Mail-Enabling Versus Mailbox-Enabling; 32.4 Exchange Delegation; 32.5 Mail-Enabling a User; 32.6 Mail-Disabling a User; 32.7 Creating and Mail-Enabling a Contact; 32.8 Mail-Disabling a Contact; 32.9 Mail-Enabling a Group (Distribution List); 32.10 Mail-Disabling a Group; 32.11 Mailbox-Enabling a User; 32.12 Mailbox-Disabling a User (Mailbox Deletion); 32.13 Purging a Disconnected Mailbox; 32.14 Reconnecting a Disconnected Mailbox; 32.15 Moving a Mailbox; 32.16 Enumerating Disconnected Mailboxes; 32.17 Viewing Mailbox Sizes and Message Counts; 32.18 Viewing All Store Details of All Mailboxes on a Server; 32.19 Dumping All Store Details of All Mailboxes on All Servers in Exchange Org; 32.20 Summary; Chapter 33: Scripting Basic Exchange 2007 Tasks; 33.1 Exchange Scripting Notes; 33.2 Managing Users; 33.3 Managing Groups; 33.4 Summary; Colophon;

Brian Desmond spends his days focused on Active Directory for some of the world's largest companies. A Microsoft MVP since 2004, Brian brings extensive knowledge of how Active Directory works and how to successfully run Active Directory deployments large and small.

Joe Richards is a consultant/admin/tool writer and Microsoft MVP for Windows Server Directory Services. Joe updated the second edition of Active Directory Cookbook for O'Reilly.

Robbie Allen is an author, entrepreneur, web industry veteran, and new father. His day job has been in IT for the last 12 years. He is the coauthor of Active Directory, 2nd Edition and the author of the Active Directory Cookbook.

Alistair G. Lowe-Norris is an Architectural Enterprise Strategy Consultant for Microsoft UK. During the writing of the first version of this book he worked for Leicester University as the project manager and technical lead of the Rapid Deployment Program for Windows 2000. During his time there, Leicester was part of Microsoft's U.K. and U.S. Rapid Deployment Programs for Windows 2000, and was responsible for rolling out what turned out to be one of the world's largest deployments of Windows 2000 preceding release of the final product. Since 1998 he has been the technical editor and a monthly columnist for the Windows Scripting Solutions magazine and a technical editor and author for Windows & .Net Magazine (previously Windows NT Magazine and Windows 2000 Magazine). In addition he is an author and editor for various other publications and online sites worldwide. He holds various Microsoft and other accreditations and has been using Windows 2000 and its descendents daily since October 1997. He lives in Leicester, UK.

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