Active Duty: Public Administration as Democratic Statesmanship

Overview

In Active Duty: Public Administration as Democratic Statesmanship, a distinguished group of contributors examines the role of the American civil service under the Constitution. The common concern that unites the otherwise diverse approaches of the authors is the conception of public administration as a particular form of political activity. The contributors relate administrative issues to the broader questions of political life, such as political judgment and responsibility, the Constitution and ...

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Overview

In Active Duty: Public Administration as Democratic Statesmanship, a distinguished group of contributors examines the role of the American civil service under the Constitution. The common concern that unites the otherwise diverse approaches of the authors is the conception of public administration as a particular form of political activity. The contributors relate administrative issues to the broader questions of political life, such as political judgment and responsibility, the Constitution and constitutionalism, and the promotion of human liberty and the common good. They aim to encourage the administrator to become a democratic statesman. Present and prospective American civil servants, as well as political scientists and political philosophers, will find this book of interest.

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Editorial Reviews

Choice
This collection is an excellent set of readings designed to stimulate critical thought about the enduring problem of the administrator's role in a democratic political system.
CHOICE
This collection is an excellent set of readings designed to stimulate critical thought about the enduring problem of the administrator's role in a democratic political system.
Booknews
An introduction to the American civil service that attempts to re-link the concept of public administration to an understanding of it as a particular kind of political activity. Fourteen contributions are organized into sections which explore present-day concerns of public administration such as policy deliberation in the case of global warming, the notion of impartiality, and the impact of Theodore Lowi's The End of Liberalism; constitutional issues including the views of The Federalist and Woodrow Wilson towards the proper place of public administration; and the relationship between public administration and personal responsibility. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780847686469
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/1/1998
  • Pages: 360
  • Product dimensions: 6.42 (w) x 9.28 (h) x 1.01 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Augustine Lawler is professor of political science at Berry College in Georgia. His most recent book is Poets, Princes, and Private Citizens (Rowman & Littlefield), which he edited with Joseph Knippenberg. Robert Martin Schaefer is associate professor of political science at the University of Mobile. He edited The American Experiment (Rowman & Littlefield), with Peter Lawler. David Lewis Schaefer is professor of political science at the College of the Holy Cross. He is the author of The Political Philosophy of Montaigne.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Preface Part 2 Part I. Some Fundamental Concerns Chapter 3 Introduction Chapter 4 American Statesmanship: Old and New Chapter 5 Toqueville on Administration and for Administrators Chapter 6 Public Administration and Policy Deliberation: The Case of Global Warming Chapter 7 Impartiality and Administrative Statesmanship Chapter 8 Theodore Lowi and the Administrative State Part 9 Part II. Administration, Political Institutions, and the Constitution Chapter 10 Introduction Chapter 11 Bureaucratic Idealism and Executive Power: A Perspective on The Federalist’s View of Public Administration Chapter 12 Administrative Responsibility and the Separation of Powers Chapter 13 The Rhetorical Presidency and the Eclipse of Executive Power in Woodrow Wilson’s Constitutional Government in the United States Chapter 14 Presidents and Their Cosmopolitan Advisors: The Nixon-Kissinger Dialogue Chapter 15 Limiting Bureaucratic Discretion: Competing Theories of Administrative Law Part 16 Part III. Rebuilding Public Administration Chapter 17 Introduction Chapter 18 The Place of Constitutionalism in the Education of Public Administrators Chapter 19 The Limits of Ethics: Revisiting the Origins of the America Regime Chapter 20 Bureaucratic Morality in the United States Chapter 21 Responsibility and Public Service Chapter 22 Index

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