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Overview

This first-of-its-kind resource is an accumulation of active learning exercises that encourage users to develop a deeper understanding of both the knowledge and skills necessary to become an excellent EMT-Basic. Chapter topics include the well-being of the EMT basic, medical/legal and ethical issues, lifting and moving patients , airway management, assessment of trauma and medical patients, general pharmacology, respiratory and cardiac emergencies poisoning and overdose emergencies, bleeding and shock, ambulance operations, and much more. : For individuals training to be emergency medical technicians.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131136298
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/27/2004
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 448
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.60 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Daniel Limmer. Dan Limmer, EMT-P, has been involved in EMS for more than 25 years. He remains active as a paramedic with Kennebunk Fire Rescue in Kennebunk, Maine, and the Kennebunkport EMS (KEMS) in Kennebunkport, Maine. A passionate educator, Dan teaches EMT and paramedic courses at the Southern Maine Community College in South Portland, Maine, and has taught at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and the Hudson Valley Community College in Troy, New York. He is a charter member of the National Association of EMS Educators and a member of the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT), for which he serves on the Advanced Medical Life Support Committee.

Dan was formerly involved in law enforcement, beginning as a dispatcher and retiring as a police officer in Colonie, New York, where he received three command recognition awards as well as the distinguished service award (Officer of the Year) in 1987. During his 20-year-law-enforcement career, he served in the communications, patrol, juvenile, narcotics, and training units.

In addition to authoring several EMS journal articles, Dan is coauthor of a number of EMS textbooks for Brady including First Responder. A Skills Approach, Essentials of Emergency Care, Advanced Medical Life Support, the military and fire service editions of Emergency Care, and others. He speaks frequently at regional, state, and national EMS conferences.

Christopher J. Le Baudour has been involved in EMS since 1978. He has worked as an EMT-I and an EMT-II in both the field and clinical settings. In 1984, Christopher began his teaching career in the Department of Public Safety-EMS Division at Santa Rosa Junior College in Santa Rosa, California.

In addition to Christopher's numerous certifications, he holds a master's degree in Education, with an emphasis on on-line teaching and learning, from California State University at Hayward. Christopher has spent the past 20 years perfecting the art of experiential learning in EMS and is well known for his innovative classroom techniques and his passion for both teaching and learning in both the traditional and on-line classrooms.

Christopher is very involved in EMS education at the national level as a member of the Distributed Learning subcommittee of the National Association of EMS Educators. He has been a presenter at both state and national conferences and is currently working on several EMS publications.

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Read an Excerpt

A ONE-OF-A-KIND RESOURCE FOR EMT STUDENTS

You now hold in your hands the Active Learning Manual for Brady's Emergency Care 10th edition textbook. Not to be mistaken for "just another workbook," the Active Learning Manual (ALM) is a "first of its kind" resource for serious EMT-B students and instructors alike.

The ALM began as the brainchild of well-known EMS author and educator Dan Limmer. Dan has teamed up with Christopher Le Baudour, another Brady author and career EMS educator, who together share over 40 years of combined experience in this valuable student resource.

First and foremost, the ALM is not a workbook. Most workbooks today are comprised mainly of test questions that prepare students for both in-class and national written exams. The ALM does this and a whole lot more! It is just what its name implies, an accumulation of active learning exercises that expand the walls of the classroom and encourage students to develop a deeper understanding of both the knowledge and skills necessary to become an excellent EMT-B.

While the ALM table of contents does follow Brady's Emergency Care 10th edition chapter for chapter, the activities for the most part are not textbook specific but instead are curriculum specific. What this means is that no matter which primary textbook you may be using for your EMT-Basic program, you will still benefit immensely from the addition of the ALM to your study program.

WHAT IS ACTIVE LEARNING

Active: adjective. To participate (take an active role)
Learning: noun. To acquire wisdom, knowledge, or skill
Active Learning: To take an active role in the acquisition of knowledge and skills

As you will see from the definition we have provided above, active learning is a process whereby you, the student, must take an active part in the learning process. Of course, you are probably thinking that you already take part in the learning process, and to some extent this is true. You take notes during lectures, ask questions of the instructor, and participate in skills practice sessions. While all these do require some level of action on your part, they for the most part place the instructor at the center of the learning. Research suggests that, as students, you must do more than simply listen. Active learning involves reading, writing, discussing, and being involved in solving problems. Simply stated, active learning means getting you, the student, involved in doing things and thinking about the things you are doing.

Most ideas about teaching are not new,
but not everyone knows the old ideas.
Euclid, c. 300 B.C.

The concept of active learning is not new. Socrates encouraged active learning by using open-ended questions to stimulate discussion and critical thinking among his students. Active learning can also take many forms such as reading, discussion, writing, exploration, and reflection. For that reason, we have assembled a variety of tools within each chapter that encourage you to become more active in your own learning, both in and out of the classroom.

DO YOU KNOW HOW YOU LEARN?

One of the best ways you can affect the learning process is to have an understanding of how you as an individual learn. There are several ways people take in information from their environment and transform that information into learning. Some of those styles of learning include visual (seeing), aural listening), and kinesthetic (doing), as well as reading and writing. Everyone has learning preferences where one or more learning styles are used for the majority of the learning.

Here is a link to a website that will provide a glimpse into your learning preferences. You may be surprised to discover that your learning preference is not what you thought it was. Once at the VARK site, begin by clicking the FAQ link to learn more about the assessment. Once you are ready to complete the assessment, click on the questionnaire link.

VARK—A guide to learning styles http://www.vark-learn.com

In addition to discovering more about your preferred learning style, you may discover a little more about how others around you process information as well. What style does your instructor emphasize in the classroom? Does his style match your style according to the VARK assessment?

MAKING ACTIVE LEARNING WORK FOR YOU

As we stated earlier in the introduction, this ALM is for the serious student who wishes to develop a deeper understanding of what it takes to become an excellent EMT-B. That deeper understanding comes at a cost. You must be willing to extend your EMT-B training beyond the classroom and engage in the recommended activities and exercises both in and out of the classroom.

In many cases, we ask that you partner with a fellow student or students to complete the exercise together. While your partner does not always have to be a fellow student, it would help tremendously if he were participating in the same class as you are. Finding one or more fellow students early on who are willing to meet before class and outside of class to work through the exercises will make the learning much more valuable and enjoyable.

ANATOMY OF THE ACTIVE LEARNING MANUAL

We have assembled a variety of activities that place you at the center of the learning process. In addition, we have strived to create activities that address as many learning styles as possible. What follows is a brief description of each of the chapter elements and how to best take full advantage of the learning opportunities they provide.

Chapter Summary

The ALM summary is a much more expanded summary than the one at the end of the chapter in the textbook. For this reason, it works especially well as a study tool prior to any in-class or national certification exams you may be taking.

Med Minute

The Med Minute feature is only contained in those chapters dealing specifically with patient emergency care, or, as we will call them, the clinical chapters. It is designed to provide a general overview of commonly prescribed medications likely to be encountered by the EMT-B while treating a patient. This feature will help develop the EMT-B's medication vocabulary and knowledge, which can be especially helpful when the patient is not able to provide a detailed history.

Pathophysiology Pearls

The Pathophysiology Pearl feature is contained in all clinical chapters and is designed to provide enhancement information relating to specific medical conditions and/or disease processes. This information will build upon the foundation started by the EC textbook. As your understanding of disease processes increases, so will your ability to anticipate and appropriately treat the patient's condition.

Pearls from the Podium

In those chapters deemed nonclinical, we have included the feature we call Pearls from the Podium. These are simple but valuable insights shared by the authors covering such topics as study tips, patient emergency care, and career tips.

Review Questions

Along with becoming an EMT-B is the opportunity to take a multitude of written exams. You will encounter many of these exams during your initial training as well as for many state and national certification processes. Like so many other things in life, more practice makes for better scores.

In an effort to provide you with as much experience as possible with written exams, we have included a variety of exam questions that resemble those you are likely to encounter in your quest to become an EMT-B and maintain your certification. Question types included in the ALM include:

  • Short answer
  • Multiple choice
  • Scenario

Detailed answers to all review questions are provided and can be found in Appendix A at the end of this manual.

Case Studies

Here is where you will really begin using your critical-thinking skills and applying the knowledge you have gained from the textbook. We have included two case studies in each chapter. Each case study presents a slightly different problem or set of problems for you to solve. Following the case study, a series of questions are asked to stimulate critical thinking. In some case studies, you will be provided additional information and presented with additional questions before completing the exercise.

Detailed answers to all case studies are provided and can be found in Appendix A at the end of this manual.

Active Exploration

Are you having fun yet? Because here is where the fun really begins! Each chapter contains two Active Exploration exercises. Many of these involve getting out and actively exploring the information and concepts presented in the textbook. Some of these can be completed by yourself while others require that you recruit others to assist you. For exercises that require additional help, we encourage you to arrange to meet with fellow students from your class so that all of you can learn together. Of course if this is not possible, you may use any available person.

You will get out of the Active Exploration exactly what you put into it. We recommend taking time to prepare thoroughly before jumping into the activities. The Active Exploration exercises will engage you in ways the classroom simply cannot. By completing each exercise, you will gain insight and develop skills that simply cannot be obtained in the classroom setting. Much of the experience gained through these activities will prove extremely valuable to your job as an EMT-B.

Retro Review

One of the difficulties of being an EMT-B student and taking in so much new information is that what you learned two weeks ago can easily be forgotten if you do not constantly go back and refresh. This becomes a big challenge when trying to prepare for a final written exam that addresses everything you learned during your course.

The Retro Review feature helps you stay on top of key concepts and information that has already been presented. This feature provides a minimum of three multiple-choice questions from previous chapters, keeping the cobwebs from forming on information presented earlier in the course.

Thinking and Linking

As instructors, we understand that learning to be an EMT-B can appear as many unrelated pieces to a huge puzzle. To help with tying the loose pieces together, we have created the Thinking and Linking table. This table is a quick reference guide for relating current chapter information to other chapters in the textbook. Here you will learn the connection and importance of related information that will help you begin to put your puzzle together.

Our Challenge to You...

Now that we have shared how this Active Learning Manual can work for you, it is up to you to make it happen! We, as the authors of this manual and as EMS educators, challenge you to take a more active role in your EMS education and to encourage your fellow students to do the same. We promise that if you work through the exercises in this manual along with the reading in your EMT textbook, you will know more about your EMS system and be more confident when treating patients than you ever thought possible!

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction to Emergency Medical Care

Chapter 2 The Well-being of the EMT-Basic

Chapter 3 Medical/Legal and Ethical Issues

Chapter 4 The Human Body

Chapter 5 Lifting and Moving Patients

Chapter 6 Airway Management

Chapter 7 Scene Size-up

Chapter 8 The Initial Assessment

Chapter 9 Vital Signs and SAMPLE History

Chapter 10 Assessment of the Trauma Patient

Chapter 11 Assessment of the Medical Patient

Chapter 12 Ongoing Assessment

Chapter 13 Communications

Chapter 14 Documentation

Chapter 15 General Pharmacology

Chapter 16 Respiratory Emergencies

Chapter 17 Cardiac Emergencies

Chapter 18 Acute Abdominal Emergencies

Chapter 19 Diabetic Emergencies and Altered Mental Status

Chapter 20 Allergic Reactions

Chapter 21 Poisoning and Overdose Emergencies

Chapter 22 Environmental Emergencies

Chapter 23 Behavioral Emergencies

Chapter 24 Obstetric and Gynecological Emergencies

Chapter 25 Putting it All Together for the Medical Patient

Chapter 26 Bleeding and Shock

Chapter 27 Soft-tissue Injuries

Chapter 28 Musculoskeletal Injuries

Chapter 29 Injuries to the Head and Spine

Chapter 30 Putting it All Together for the Trauma Patient

Chapter 31 Infants and Children

Chapter 32 Geriatric Emergencies

Chapter 33 Ambulance Operations

Chapter 34 Gaining Access and Rescue Operations

Chapter 35 Special Operations

Chapter 36 Terrorism and EMS

Chapter 37 Advanced Airway Management

Read More Show Less

Preface

A ONE-OF-A-KIND RESOURCE FOR EMT STUDENTS

You now hold in your hands the Active Learning Manual for Brady's Emergency Care 10th edition textbook. Not to be mistaken for "just another workbook," the Active Learning Manual (ALM) is a "first of its kind" resource for serious EMT-B students and instructors alike.

The ALM began as the brainchild of well-known EMS author and educator Dan Limmer. Dan has teamed up with Christopher Le Baudour, another Brady author and career EMS educator, who together share over 40 years of combined experience in this valuable student resource.

First and foremost, the ALM is not a workbook. Most workbooks today are comprised mainly of test questions that prepare students for both in-class and national written exams. The ALM does this and a whole lot more! It is just what its name implies, an accumulation of active learning exercises that expand the walls of the classroom and encourage students to develop a deeper understanding of both the knowledge and skills necessary to become an excellent EMT-B.

While the ALM table of contents does follow Brady's Emergency Care 10th edition chapter for chapter, the activities for the most part are not textbook specific but instead are curriculum specific. What this means is that no matter which primary textbook you may be using for your EMT-Basic program, you will still benefit immensely from the addition of the ALM to your study program.

WHAT IS ACTIVE LEARNING

Active: adjective. To participate (take an active role)
Learning: noun. To acquire wisdom, knowledge, or skill
Active Learning: To take an active role in the acquisition of knowledge and skills

As you will see from the definition we have provided above, active learning is a process whereby you, the student, must take an active part in the learning process. Of course, you are probably thinking that you already take part in the learning process, and to some extent this is true. You take notes during lectures, ask questions of the instructor, and participate in skills practice sessions. While all these do require some level of action on your part, they for the most part place the instructor at the center of the learning. Research suggests that, as students, you must do more than simply listen. Active learning involves reading, writing, discussing, and being involved in solving problems. Simply stated, active learning means getting you, the student, involved in doing things and thinking about the things you are doing.

Most ideas about teaching are not new,
but not everyone knows the old ideas.
Euclid, c. 300 B.C.

The concept of active learning is not new. Socrates encouraged active learning by using open-ended questions to stimulate discussion and critical thinking among his students. Active learning can also take many forms such as reading, discussion, writing, exploration, and reflection. For that reason, we have assembled a variety of tools within each chapter that encourage you to become more active in your own learning, both in and out of the classroom.

DO YOU KNOW HOW YOU LEARN?

One of the best ways you can affect the learning process is to have an understanding of how you as an individual learn. There are several ways people take in information from their environment and transform that information into learning. Some of those styles of learning include visual (seeing), aural listening), and kinesthetic (doing), as well as reading and writing. Everyone has learning preferences where one or more learning styles are used for the majority of the learning.

Here is a link to a website that will provide a glimpse into your learning preferences. You may be surprised to discover that your learning preference is not what you thought it was. Once at the VARK site, begin by clicking the FAQ link to learn more about the assessment. Once you are ready to complete the assessment, click on the questionnaire link.

VARK—A guide to learning styles http://www.vark-learn.com

In addition to discovering more about your preferred learning style, you may discover a little more about how others around you process information as well. What style does your instructor emphasize in the classroom? Does his style match your style according to the VARK assessment?

MAKING ACTIVE LEARNING WORK FOR YOU

As we stated earlier in the introduction, this ALM is for the serious student who wishes to develop a deeper understanding of what it takes to become an excellent EMT-B. That deeper understanding comes at a cost. You must be willing to extend your EMT-B training beyond the classroom and engage in the recommended activities and exercises both in and out of the classroom.

In many cases, we ask that you partner with a fellow student or students to complete the exercise together. While your partner does not always have to be a fellow student, it would help tremendously if he were participating in the same class as you are. Finding one or more fellow students early on who are willing to meet before class and outside of class to work through the exercises will make the learning much more valuable and enjoyable.

ANATOMY OF THE ACTIVE LEARNING MANUAL

We have assembled a variety of activities that place you at the center of the learning process. In addition, we have strived to create activities that address as many learning styles as possible. What follows is a brief description of each of the chapter elements and how to best take full advantage of the learning opportunities they provide.

Chapter Summary

The ALM summary is a much more expanded summary than the one at the end of the chapter in the textbook. For this reason, it works especially well as a study tool prior to any in-class or national certification exams you may be taking.

Med Minute

The Med Minute feature is only contained in those chapters dealing specifically with patient emergency care, or, as we will call them, the clinical chapters. It is designed to provide a general overview of commonly prescribed medications likely to be encountered by the EMT-B while treating a patient. This feature will help develop the EMT-B's medication vocabulary and knowledge, which can be especially helpful when the patient is not able to provide a detailed history.

Pathophysiology Pearls

The Pathophysiology Pearl feature is contained in all clinical chapters and is designed to provide enhancement information relating to specific medical conditions and/or disease processes. This information will build upon the foundation started by the EC textbook. As your understanding of disease processes increases, so will your ability to anticipate and appropriately treat the patient's condition.

Pearls from the Podium

In those chapters deemed nonclinical, we have included the feature we call Pearls from the Podium. These are simple but valuable insights shared by the authors covering such topics as study tips, patient emergency care, and career tips.

Review Questions

Along with becoming an EMT-B is the opportunity to take a multitude of written exams. You will encounter many of these exams during your initial training as well as for many state and national certification processes. Like so many other things in life, more practice makes for better scores.

In an effort to provide you with as much experience as possible with written exams, we have included a variety of exam questions that resemble those you are likely to encounter in your quest to become an EMT-B and maintain your certification. Question types included in the ALM include:

  • Short answer
  • Multiple choice
  • Scenario

Detailed answers to all review questions are provided and can be found in Appendix A at the end of this manual.

Case Studies

Here is where you will really begin using your critical-thinking skills and applying the knowledge you have gained from the textbook. We have included two case studies in each chapter. Each case study presents a slightly different problem or set of problems for you to solve. Following the case study, a series of questions are asked to stimulate critical thinking. In some case studies, you will be provided additional information and presented with additional questions before completing the exercise.

Detailed answers to all case studies are provided and can be found in Appendix A at the end of this manual.

Active Exploration

Are you having fun yet? Because here is where the fun really begins! Each chapter contains two Active Exploration exercises. Many of these involve getting out and actively exploring the information and concepts presented in the textbook. Some of these can be completed by yourself while others require that you recruit others to assist you. For exercises that require additional help, we encourage you to arrange to meet with fellow students from your class so that all of you can learn together. Of course if this is not possible, you may use any available person.

You will get out of the Active Exploration exactly what you put into it. We recommend taking time to prepare thoroughly before jumping into the activities. The Active Exploration exercises will engage you in ways the classroom simply cannot. By completing each exercise, you will gain insight and develop skills that simply cannot be obtained in the classroom setting. Much of the experience gained through these activities will prove extremely valuable to your job as an EMT-B.

Retro Review

One of the difficulties of being an EMT-B student and taking in so much new information is that what you learned two weeks ago can easily be forgotten if you do not constantly go back and refresh. This becomes a big challenge when trying to prepare for a final written exam that addresses everything you learned during your course.

The Retro Review feature helps you stay on top of key concepts and information that has already been presented. This feature provides a minimum of three multiple-choice questions from previous chapters, keeping the cobwebs from forming on information presented earlier in the course.

Thinking and Linking

As instructors, we understand that learning to be an EMT-B can appear as many unrelated pieces to a huge puzzle. To help with tying the loose pieces together, we have created the Thinking and Linking table. This table is a quick reference guide for relating current chapter information to other chapters in the textbook. Here you will learn the connection and importance of related information that will help you begin to put your puzzle together.

Our Challenge to You...

Now that we have shared how this Active Learning Manual can work for you, it is up to you to make it happen! We, as the authors of this manual and as EMS educators, challenge you to take a more active role in your EMS education and to encourage your fellow students to do the same. We promise that if you work through the exercises in this manual along with the reading in your EMT textbook, you will know more about your EMS system and be more confident when treating patients than you ever thought possible!

Read More Show Less

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