Acts of God [NOOK Book]

Overview

The human race. You have to love it and wish it well and not preach or think you have any reason to think you are better than anyone else. Amen. Good-bye. Peace . . .


Master short story writer Ellen Gilchrist, winner of the National Book Award, returns with her first story collection in over eight years. In Acts of God, she has crafted ten different scenarios in which people dealing with forces beyond their ...

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Acts of God

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Overview

The human race. You have to love it and wish it well and not preach or think you have any reason to think you are better than anyone else. Amen. Good-bye. Peace . . .


Master short story writer Ellen Gilchrist, winner of the National Book Award, returns with her first story collection in over eight years. In Acts of God, she has crafted ten different scenarios in which people dealing with forces beyond their control somehow manage to survive, persevere, and triumph, even if it is only a triumph of the will.

For Marie James, a teenager from Fayetteville, Arkansas, the future changes when she joins a group of friends in their effort to find survivors among the debris left when a tornado destroys a neighboring town.

For Philipa, a woman blessed with beauty and love and a life without care, the decision she makes to take control of her fate is perhaps the easiest she has ever made. As she writes to Charles, her husband and lifetime partner, “Nothing is of value except to have lived well and to die without pain.”

For Eli Naylor, left orphaned by a flood, there comes an understanding that sometimes out of tragedy can come the greatest good, as he finds a life and a future in a most unexpected place.

In one way or another, all of these people are fighters and believers, survivors who find the strength to go on when faced with the truth of their mortality, and they are given vivid life in these stories, told with Ellen Gilchrist’s clear-eyed optimism and salty sense of humor.

As a critic in the Washington Post wrote in reviewing one of the author’s earlier works, “To say that Ellen Gilchrist can write is to say that Placido Domingo can sing. All you have to do is listen.

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Daniel Handler
[Gilchrist's] style can be an acquired taste. If I were you, I'd acquire it…Gilchrist trafficks very little in the basic trappings of what so much great literature rests upon. There's hardly anything opaque or ambiguous. Even if her characters change their minds immediately…they mean precisely what they say. You'd be hard pressed to even find metaphors in Gilchrist's work…It is true that sometimes her guilelessness can tip over…but far more often than not Gilchrist manages to cut through the loud tussle of the world to present truths made even more striking by how conventional they are. More than the Southerners she's often lumped with, Gilchrist reminds me of David Mamet—another writer who sets up dramatic circumstances…just for the joy of knocking around good plain sentences…the stories in Acts of God are great postcards from the world of Ellen Gilchrist. It's a world of war and strife and surprises, and it is, yes, marvelous to behold.
Publishers Weekly
12/16/2013
The South is alive and vibrant in Gilchrist’s latest collection of 11 stories, and so are some of her best-known characters, whom readers first met in Gilchrist’s 1984 National Book Award–winning collection, Victory Over Japan. The redoubtable Rhoda Manning initiates an escalating epistolary exchange with the owner of barking canines in “The Dogs.” In “Toccata and Fugue in D Minor,” Anna Hand’s niece, Louise, meets a devoted editor of her late aunt’s books while they’re both trapped in Heathrow by a terrorist attack. Many of these characters are longtime habitués of Gilchrist’s fiction, and they typify her trademark Southern women—voluble, friendly, strenuously polite, and just a bit eccentric. These “upper-middle-class white protestant princesses” value family lineage, good manners, and meandering, leisurely recollections. Set in New Orleans; Fayetteville, Ark.; and Biloxi, Miss., Gilchrist’s narratives are sedate, chatty, and linear, which will attract readers who welcome what is now considered old-fashioned storytelling. In several tales—e.g., “A Love Story,” “The Dissolution of the Myelin Sheath,” “Jumping Off Bridges into Clean Water”—Gilchrist veers into sentimental territory, twice employing plots involving suicide. One may carp that Gilchrist gives all of her characters the same voice and verbal cadences, but their dialogue rings with a Southern lilt that makes the characters distinctive and appealing. (Apr.)
Previous reviews
Praise for Ellen Gilchrist:

“Her stories seem charged with an irresistible energy . . . Stories of passion and science, poetry and shyness. They brim with just the right amount of mystery.” —USA Today

“Like someone taking home movies—but with a clearly focused and artfully held lens—Gilchrist catches her people.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Gilchrist is in the company of Anne Tyler, Louise Erdrich and Ellen Douglas, intrepid explorers of the human heart.” New York Newsday

Review quotes

“[Gilchrist’s] style can be an acquired taste. If I were you, I’d acquire it . . . Gilchrist manages to cut through the loud tussle of the world to present truths made even more striking by how conventional they are . . . The stories in Acts of God are great postcards from the world of Ellen Gilchrist. It’s a world of war and strife and surprises, and it is, yes, marvelous to behold.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Admirers of her work, among whom I am most certainly to be counted, will find much herein that is familiar and pleasing . . . Gilchrist is at her best when the wry and satirical mood strikes her, especially when she is pricking the balloons of pride that the white Southern upper middle class inflates in its own honor. Now in her late 70s, she has lost none of the zing that brought In the Land of Dreamy Dreams to such wholly unexpected attention, and it’s a pleasure to report that the best of the stories in Acts of God rank with the best in her first collection and in her second, Victory Over Japan, for which she was awarded a richly deserved National Book Award in 1984.” —The Washington Post

“Flawlessly precise.” —ReadersDigest.com

“Reading Ellen Gilchrist is addictive . . . Partly, it's the sassy voice that snares you, and partly it's her tight circle of recurrent characters--feisty, unabashedly sexed Southern women, many of whom are related by birth or marriage . . . Her new work is filled with good people who show fortitude and even heroism under duress . . . In this age of edgy irony, her warm-hearted view of humanity is refreshing.” —NPR.org

“A joy to read. Her protagonists all feel very alive and real.” —Bust

“[Gilchrist’s] protagonists are generally beautiful and strong, sometimes shallow and often deeply flawed--but they’re always interesting, especially when they’re tested . . . In Acts of God, though, they learn a lesson that Gilchrist’s characters often don’t: that even the rich and the powerful, the quick-witted and the good-looking are vulnerable to storms and disasters, to illness and aging and death . . . These 10 new stories remind the reader we’re all vulnerable to chance, whether it’s a hurricane or a love affair. And these characters, the old ones and the new, settle seamlessly into Gilchrist’s seductive Southern world.” —Houston Chronicle

“The stories are laced through with good humor and hints of the miraculous . . . There is something--a magic that’s difficult to clarify, that may be corny in someone else’s eyes--to Gilchrist’s work that doesn’t come around often . . . Gilchrist still has the power to turn a simple line into a profound insight on what it’s like to be human. Aging and death are the twin ghouls running throughout Acts of God, looming over the characters, and the result of looking into the void gives these stories wisdom and compassion, or to quote Gilchrist: ‘Glad to be alive in the only world there is, alive and eating and still breathing and not afraid really of anything that might happen next.’” —Flavorpill.com

“Gilchrist’s deliciously wise and humorous voice abides best in the short story form, and her new collection of 10 stories will say to her fans that their reconnection to this openhearted writer from the South is a pure old-home-week experience . . . Beautiful, smart, phenomenally rich.” —Booklist (starred review)

From the Publisher
“[Gilchrist’s] style can be an acquired taste. If I were you, I’d acquire it . . . Gilchrist manages to cut through the loud tussle of the world to present truths made even more striking by how conventional they are . . . The stories in Acts of God are great postcards from the world of Ellen Gilchrist. It’s a world of war and strife and surprises, and it is, yes, marvelous to behold.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Admirers of her work, among whom I am most certainly to be counted, will find much herein that is familiar and pleasing . . . Gilchrist is at her best when the wry and satirical mood strikes her, especially when she is pricking the balloons of pride that the white Southern upper middle class inflates in its own honor. Now in her late 70s, she has lost none of the zing that brought In the Land of Dreamy Dreams to such wholly unexpected attention, and it’s a pleasure to report that the best of the stories in Acts of God rank with the best in her first collection and in her second, Victory Over Japan, for which she was awarded a richly deserved National Book Award in 1984.” —The Washington Post

“Flawlessly precise.” —ReadersDigest.com

“Reading Ellen Gilchrist is addictive . . . Partly, it's the sassy voice that snares you, and partly it's her tight circle of recurrent characters—feisty, unabashedly sexed Southern women, many of whom are related by birth or marriage . . . Her new work is filled with good people who show fortitude and even heroism under duress . . . In this age of edgy irony, her warm-hearted view of humanity is refreshing.” —NPR.org

“A joy to read. Her protagonists all feel very alive and real.” —Bust

“[Gilchrist’s] protagonists are generally beautiful and strong, sometimes shallow and often deeply flawed—but they’re always interesting, especially when they’re tested . . . In Acts of God, though, they learn a lesson that Gilchrist’s characters often don’t: that even the rich and the powerful, the quick-witted and the good-looking are vulnerable to storms and disasters, to illness and aging and death . . . These 10 new stories remind the reader we’re all vulnerable to chance, whether it’s a hurricane or a love affair. And these characters, the old ones and the new, settle seamlessly into Gilchrist’s seductive Southern world.” —Houston Chronicle

“The stories are laced through with good humor and hints of the miraculous . . . There is something—a magic that’s difficult to clarify, that may be corny in someone else’s eyes—to Gilchrist’s work that doesn’t come around often . . . Gilchrist still has the power to turn a simple line into a profound insight on what it’s like to be human. Aging and death are the twin ghouls running throughout Acts of God, looming over the characters, and the result of looking into the void gives these stories wisdom and compassion, or to quote Gilchrist: ‘Glad to be alive in the only world there is, alive and eating and still breathing and not afraid really of anything that might happen next.’” —Flavorpill.com

“Gilchrist’s deliciously wise and humorous voice abides best in the short story form, and her new collection of 10 stories will say to her fans that their reconnection to this openhearted writer from the South is a pure old-home-week experience . . . Beautiful, smart, phenomenally rich.” —Booklist (starred review)

Library Journal
01/01/2014
A complaint one often hears about modern literary fiction—and especially short fiction—is that it is almost predictably "dark" and "pessimistic." This new collection of stories by National Book Award winner Gilchrist (Victory over Japan) unfolds almost as if she herself feels precisely this way and has written a book to remedy this situation. Here she unabashedly and movingly celebrates life, true love, and triumphs over calamity and adversity. As the title suggests, Gilchrist frankly acknowledges throughout those things in life that we often can't control or understand, including illness, mistakes, natural disasters, old age, human ignorance, and acts of violence. And yet each tale celebrates her characters' willingness to learn from misfortune and loss, not to be diminished by it—and to change for the better. VERDICT Gilchrist notes that this group of stories come from her later years, suggesting that they reflect a lifetime of observing, writing, and living, and she has created a work of considerable wisdom and grace. Fans of both literary and general fiction will likely find this volume refreshing, engaging, and inspiring.—Patrick Sullivan, Manchester Community Coll., CT
Kirkus Reviews
2014-01-21
Disaster becomes the impetus for renewed faith in goodness, love and spiritual uplift in these 10 stories about kindhearted Southerners from Gilchrist (A Dangerous Age, 2008, etc.). In the title story, Hurricane Katrina is a sideline disaster. An elderly couple, beloveds since high school in homespun Madison, Ga. (in reality, a town of restored quaintness full of retirees and tourists), is left on their own when their caregiver stays home to deal long distance with her evacuated son. Driving home from the grocery store, the octogenarians have a fatal accident, but the aftermath turns into a celebration of expanding connections. Similarly, in "The Dissolution of Myelin Sheath," an ailing woman's suicide influences her daughter's therapist to appreciate life more. More elderly lovers appear in the sketch "A Love Story" and in "Jumping Off Bridges into Clean Water," which skims nearly 50 years of another devoted relationship. Five teenage volunteers at the site of a tornado find the level of goodness in their lives permanently raised after they find a living baby in "Miracle in Adkins, Arkansas." Ditto the accounting instructor in "Collateral," who finds herself a husband after her stint in the National Guard in post-Katrina New Orleans. Equally charmed are the lives of two gay paramedics from Los Angeles who happen to be vacationing in the Big Easy when the hurricane hits in "High Water." In "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor," three Southern ladies (former sorority sisters) on their way to a vacation in Italy are delayed at Heathrow Airport during a bomb scare and share life stories with others stuck over free drinks and hors d'oeuvres in the first-class lounge—the sense of privilege, taken for granted by the author, may grate on readers. Rhoda Manning, a character from Gilchrist's previous fiction, reappears in "The Dogs" to stir up her neighbors against uppity new move-ins with misbehaving mutts. The volume's first hint of diversity appears in the final story, about a black child saved by kindly white plantation owners in 1901. Overly sentimental.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616203955
  • Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
  • Publication date: 4/8/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 77,019
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Ellen Gilchrist, winner of the National Book Award for Victory Over Japan, is the author of more than twenty books, including novels, short stories, poetry, and a memoir. She lives in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

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Read an Excerpt

Acts of God

Stories


By Ellen Gilchrist

ALGONQUIN BOOKS OF CHAPEL HILL

Copyright © 2014 Ellen Gilchrist
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-61620-110-4



CHAPTER 1

Acts of God


Because of the hurricane on the coast, the sitter was two hours late to the McCamey house that Saturday morning. The hurricane had not affected Madison, Georgia, but it had affected the sitter's son who had made the mistake of moving to New Orleans the year before. So the sitter had been on the phone all Saturday morning trying to placate her sister in Texas who had taken the son and his girlfriend in and was getting tired of them, especially the cats which the girlfriend had insisted on bringing to the sister's house.

Because the sitter was late, Mr. William Angus McCamey and Mrs. Amelie Louise Tucker McCamey were alone from seven on Friday night until ten forty-five on Saturday morning, after which it didn't matter anymore whether the sitter was watching out for them.

"I can't stand the bacon she buys," Amelie had begun by saying, at six that Saturday morning when she was trying to get some breakfast going on the new stove her daughter, Anne, had moved into their kitchen the week before. "It won't crisp no matter how long you cook it."

"It's the milk that gets me," Will joined in. "I'd just as soon go on and die as drink that watered-down milk she gets."

"Cream," Amelie added. "It doesn't hurt to have cream for the coffee."

"Let's make some real coffee," Will said. "I'll make it. Where's our percolator." He opened a cabinet and got out the old percolator they had bought together at Lewis Hardware forty years before and took it down and went to the sink and rinsed it out and filled it with water and found the real coffee behind the sugar and started measuring it in.

Amelie passed behind him on her way to get some paper towels for the bacon and he stopped her and put his hands on her back end and held them there. "Bad boy," she said. "Let me finish with this bacon."


Amelie and Will had been in love since the eighth grade at Madison Junior High when Will was the quarterback of the junior high team and Amelie was a cheerleader in a wool skirt that came down below her knees and a white wool sweater with a large M just in front of her new breasts. This was back when cheerleaders watched the football games and only got up to cheer when the team was having a timeout.


The Madison Junior High was a three-story brick building on Lee Street, and it was still in use as a grade school, kindergarten through sixth grade. Many of their fourteen grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren had gone to school there. Their great-grandchildren played in the school yard where Will gave Amelie her first kiss and where he had pushed her on the swings when the swings were twice as high as the safe ones they have now.

It was in a neighborhood that still boasted mansions and pretty wooden houses, but the houses were inhabited now by people who commuted to Atlanta and weren't from old Madison families like the McCameys and the Tuckers and the Walkers and the Garths. None of the new people belonged to the Daughters of the American Revolution, much less the Children of the Confederacy, and none of them ever came by to say hello to Will and Amelie or tell them they lived in the neighborhood.

Will and Amelie still lived in the white wooden house their daddies had bought for them the week it was discovered they had run off to South Carolina to be married, and with good cause, after what they had been doing after football games the fall they were seniors in high school. Will was the quarterback of the high school team and Amelie had given up being cheerleader to be the drum major of the marching band. Amelie and Will had been in love so long they couldn't remember when it began, although Will said he remembered the first kiss and how the leaves were turning red on the maple trees on the school yard. "They couldn't have been turning red," Amelie always said. "I had on a blue cotton dress with yellow flowers embroidered on the collar. I would not have been wearing that to school in October."


At eighty-six they were still in love and they did not forget what they had done on the front seat of Will's daddy's Ford car or on the screened-in porch of Amelie's Aunt Lucy's house in the country.

Walkerrest, the house was called, with two r's, and it was there that things first got out of hand. Amelie was caring for her aunt one football weekend while her aunt's husband was at a Coca-Cola board meeting in Atlanta. The aunt was crippled from a childhood illness and had no children of her own, but she had a face as lovely as an angel's and never complained or blamed God for having to stay in a wheelchair most of the time.

Will and Amelie did not forget that night at Walkerrest, or later, lying in bed in their new house with Amelie's stomach the size of a watermelon, sleeping in the four-poster bed in the house where they would live for seventy years.

The first baby was a boy named William Tucker so he wouldn't be a junior, and after him were Daniel and Morgan and Peter and Walker and then Jeanne and Jessica and Olivia and Anne.

In all the years Will and Amelie lived in the house they never went to bed without burying their hatchets and remembering they loved each other. They had a gift for being married and they were lucky and they knew it. They even kept on knowing it when their twin boys died at birth and had to be buried out at Walkerrest with their ancestors.

The sitter had come to live with them when they were eighty-four, a year after they had to quit driving and a year before they made their children get the sitter a house of her own.

"Or we shall surely go insane," Amelie protested. "She watches television all day long or listens to the radio. She is not always nice to us. We can not live with that all day and night."

"Night and day," William added. "We have telephones in every room. We won't both break our hips at once with no one looking. Or if we did then the laws of chance will have triumphed over human caution and we will accept our fate."

"Amen," Amelie said. "We can not have her here all day and night. We do not deserve this unkindness."

"We'll get a different lady," their daughter Olivia protested.

"They are all the same," Will said. "We have tried four. Each one is like the rest. Who would have such a job, watching old people to keep them from driving their car?"

"Or drinking sherry in the afternoon," Amelie added. "As if I ever had more than two small sherries at once in my life."

"All right," their daughter Anne agreed. "We will get her a place nearby and she can be here in the daytime."

"From ten until four," William bargained.

"From seven to dark," Anne said.

"A costly cruelty," Amelie charged.

"The insurance pays," Olivia said. "You know that, Momma. And you know we love you."


The new sitter program had been in place for seven months when Hurricane Katrina came across Florida and grew into a typhoon and slammed into the Gulf Coast of Mississippi and Louisiana and caused the sitter's son to flee to Texas with his girlfriend, causing the sitter to have to stay on the phone for two hours begging her sister not to kick them out until they found another place to stay. Then to sit and cry for another hour and dread going to the McCameys' house to have Mr. and Mrs. McCamey keep asking her to turn down the television set. I'll just stay home and watch the stories in my own house, the sitter told herself. I'm depressed from this hurricane and I hate my selfish sister and I wish her husband would just shoot the cats or take them to the woods and turn them loose. The sitter cried long and bitter tears and then opened a package of sweet rolls and sat down to watch the news on her own television set.


At seven thirty she called the McCameys' house to tell Mr. McCamey she would not be in until later in the day, perhaps not until afternoon.

At seven forty-five Will finished his third cup of coffee and polished off his eggs and told Amelie, "Let's go to the store. I am tired of that white-trash woman telling us what to eat. Let's go shopping."

"In the car?" Amelie asked, giggling.

"In our car," he answered.


Thirty minutes later they were dressed and out in the garage climbing into the last Pontiac they had ever bought from Walker Pontiac on Elm and Main in downtown Madison. It was twelve years old and their son Walker had been begging them to give it to his grandson, but they had refused, writing a check for five thousand dollars to the boy instead. The McCameys' yardman kept it polished and ran the motor once a week and checked the oil and tires. It was dark blue and so comfortable that sometimes at night they backed it out of the garage and sat in it in the yard and cuddled up and talked about their children and the church and the state.

Now, on this sun-drenched Saturday morning with Amelie by his side, Will backed the Pontiac out of the garage, turned expertly around in the yard and drove out onto the street leading to the grocery store. The old grocery store was gone from that part of town, of course, and the new one was on a new road going south from town toward the new subdivisions being built by Little Buddy Scott, whose daddy had played ball with their son, Peter.

It was twenty minutes to the grocery store and they sailed along at twenty-five miles an hour and turned into the parking lot. Will got out and came around the hood and opened the door and helped his bride out of her carriage and she took his arm and they walked into the new Winn-Dixie store.

They had hardly made it to the produce section when they met a woman they knew who played tennis with their tennis-playing granddaughter. "Mr. Will," she exclaimed. "Miss Amelie. How good to see you. What are you doing at the grocery store?"

"Trying to buy some bacon and some ice cream," Will answered.

"We ran away from the wretched sitter," Amelie said. "Don't tell Anne on us."

"I never would," the woman said. "Let me walk around with you. I'll help you find things."

By the time the McCameys had their cart loaded with groceries they had a retinue of four young friends, all praising their courage and promising silence.

At the checkout stand there were seven people waiting to help them into the car. Jeannie Mayes and Margo Hight put the groceries in the backseat although Amelie would have preferred to have them in the trunk.

Their retinue stood gaily waving as Will and Amelie drove carefully across the parking lot and turned onto the road to home.

"Let's ride down and look at the new subdivision," Will said. "Just take fifteen minutes, there and back."

"Let's do," Amelie agreed and slid over beside him and put her hand on his thigh as she had always done all their years of riding in cars together. She slid it down toward his knee, of course, as she was a lady and to the manor born.


"Look at that," Will said, as they approached the subdivision. "They're building a swimming pool at the foot of the hill. I'd never build a pool down there. Little Buddy must be going into debt on all of this. I heard he was in debt to every bank in Atlanta."

Will turned the wheel to drive in closer to the construction site. The fence had been taken down to make room for the tractors making the excavation and Will was able to drive right up to the beginning of the downcline. The sun was halfway up its arc in a clear blue Georgia sky. The sunlight on the windshield was brilliant and Will let it warm his face as it clouded his vision. His loins stirred at the warmth of Amelie's hand on his thigh, his heart turned over at the beauty of the morning. He touched the accelerator with a light foot as the front wheels went past the nonexistent berm and the Pontiac went straight down the incline and plowed into a concrete pillar. Amelie's hand pulled at the cloth of his pants and her head moved fast into the windshield and she was gone so fast she could not have counted to three. Mr. Will couldn't see the blood because he was not wearing a seat belt either and he had broken his neck on the steering wheel.

It did not hurt. It doesn't hurt, Mr. Will thought. Why doesn't it hurt? I think we are in the swimming pool, but there is no water and nothing hurts and that is that, I suppose, for now.

"Mr. Will," Little Buddy Scott was screaming. He had been climbing up onto a tractor when he saw the Pontiac fall into the pool. He climbed down from the tractor and came running like the flying halfback he had been, but it was too late. "Mr. Will," he screamed. "Can you open the door?"

Will raised his head a fraction of an inch from the steering wheel and looked into Little Buddy's blue-green eyes, just like his grandmother's had been. "There's ice cream in the back seat, Little Buddy. Be sure someone puts that in the freezer." Then he put his head back on the wheel and time stopped for him.


"A good thing about trauma," the doctor told his sons and daughters. "It narrows the focus. It's the accident victim's friend. I doubt if he even knew it happened."

"It was the sitter's fault," Anne kept insisting. "I knew we couldn't trust that woman."

"You are too quick to blame," Walker told her. "The fault lies with the hurricane. She was tending to her family."

"They are gone," Olivia wept.

"The old fools," Jessica wept beside her. "They never listened to a thing but themselves in their whole lives."

"Don't say that out loud," her husband, David, cautioned. He was an Episcopal minister now, although he had been raised a south Georgia Baptist. He always tried to grab the high moral ground any chance he got. "Acts of God are not caused by human beings. They are of the Lord and he knows why he made them."

"Just leave me alone," Jessica said. "I'll say anything I like in my own mother's house."

"We're in the funeral home, Momma," her daughter put in. "We aren't in Grandmomma's house."

"How could they have done this to us," Jessica kept wailing. "After everything we did to make them safe."

"He told me to put the ice cream in the freezer." Little Buddy Scott drew near and joined the conversation. Jessica McCamey had been his Sunday School teacher and his ideal woman from the time he was seven until he was grown. He put his hand on her arm and looked deep into her eyes. "He was not in pain, Jessica, and your Momma was already dead. There are a lot worse ways to go when you are as old as they were. This could have been a blessing in disguise."

Jessica moved in nearer to him. She had always thought Little Buddy was a good-looking man. From the time he was a football hero until he started being a wealthy man she had had her eye on him. Well, I'm sixty years old, she remembered. He's Jessica Anne's age, not mine.

"Thank you for coming to help them," she told him, letting him keep hold of her arm. "I have to accept this, I know, but it's taking time, Little Buddy. I was at the beauty parlor getting a manicure when they called me. Can you imagine what that was like?"

"I was climbing onto a tractor," he agreed. "And it was my swimming pool, my wall of concrete that was hardly dry."

"I was in my office," Walker said. "Anything can happen at any time."

"Let's pray," David offered. "Let's hold hands and say a prayer of thanksgiving for their lives. We're a family. Let's remember that we are one."

"Invite the sitter to the funeral," Jessica put in, to show off for Little Buddy what a nice lady she was. "Let's not forget her pain and guilty conscience."

While they were arguing and mourning and chattering and all the things human beings do with their wonderful voices and memories, especially in times of death, which is the worst thing they have to dread and contend and struggle with, the doors of the funeral home opened and the oldest son came in with his retinue. William Tucker had grown up to become a graduate of West Point and a four-star general and lived in Washington, D.C., and only came home for weddings and funerals. He came in wearing his uniform with his wife of forty years by his side and two of his sons and one of his daughters and her daughters. They were immediately surrounded by his brothers and sisters and taken into the adjoining room to view the bodies of his parents.

"A sad but brilliant death," he pronounced. "I didn't want Daddy to be an old man but this was more than I expected. What can I do to help?" he asked.

"Help us decide about pallbearers," his brother Daniel said. " There are so many children and they will all want to be one."


At the sitter's house the sitter was crying her heart out to her next-door neighbor. "It's all my fault," she wailed. "I was derelict. I didn't do my duty."

"They were old fools," the neighbor said. "Their children should have taken away the car. No one can blame you. You called them. You said you would be late."

"Late," the sitter wailed. "Oh, I was far too late."

"Well, they called and asked you to attend the funeral," the sitter's other neighbor put in. "I think you better start finding something to wear. I have a black dress if you don't have one."

"I can't go," the sitter said. "How can I show my face."

"They were old fools," the next-door neighbor said again. "Everyone knows that's true."


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Acts of God by Ellen Gilchrist. Copyright © 2014 Ellen Gilchrist. Excerpted by permission of ALGONQUIN BOOKS OF CHAPEL HILL.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

1. Acts of God, 1,
2. Miracle in Adkins, Arkansas, 17,
3. Collateral, 39,
4. High Water, 87,
5. Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, 109,
6. The Dogs, 157,
7. The Dissolution of the Myelin Sheath, 177,
8. A Love Story, 197,
9. Jumping Off Bridges into Clean Water, 205,
10. Hopedale, A History in Four Acts, 223,

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2014

    I have liked Ellen Gilchrist's work but sometimes find her books

    I have liked Ellen Gilchrist's work but sometimes find her books slow.
    As in many short story collections, the stories are uneven

     For whatever, reason I like the last group of five stories much better then her first group of stories.
    As in some of her novels, you have to not mind stories of older people killing themselves before they die of a disease where
    this is seen as a positive act.

    I received a copy of this book for Netgalley in exchange for a honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

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