Adaline Falling Star

Adaline Falling Star

5.0 3
by Mary Pope Osborne, Elaina Erika Davis
     
 

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After the death of her mother, Adaline is sent to live in St. Louis while her father—the famous scout Kit Carson—explores the West. Yearning for the faraway world of her mother's people and desperate for proof of her father's love, Adaline flees the home of her cruel relatives to forge her own course through the wilderness. When she allows an abandoned…  See more details below

Overview

After the death of her mother, Adaline is sent to live in St. Louis while her father—the famous scout Kit Carson—explores the West. Yearning for the faraway world of her mother's people and desperate for proof of her father's love, Adaline flees the home of her cruel relatives to forge her own course through the wilderness. When she allows an abandoned dog to join her on the trail, and to enter her heart, everything she ever knew about love and loyalty is put to the test.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Osborne (The Magic Tree) strikes out in a new direction in this assured novel based on a real, though little-known character: the daughter of Kit Carson and his Arapaho wife. As the story opens, 11-year-old narrator Adaline has lost her mother to fever, and her father has deposited her with pious relatives in St. Louis while he heads west on a scouting expedition. "Hold your tongue, darter, was Pa's last words of advice, and ever since, I been as quiet as a rabbit in the grass," notes the normally outspoken girl. Though Adaline knows how to read, her father's cousin assumes she's ignorant and mute and puts her to work instead of enrolling her in his school. Her intolerant Christian relatives tap into historical stereotypes (Cousin Silas introduces Adaline as having a "devilish mixture of white and Indian blood"; his daughter, Lilly, tells Adaline, "You must have done some sinning before you were born, or you wouldn't have been born half red"). Readers may well breathe a sigh of relief when the second half of the novel takes a Huck Finn-esque turn, as Adeline heads downriver in search of her father. Vivid historical detail and descriptive prose ("my heart beats like it's filled with bird wings") fuel the narrative. Adaline possesses a wisdom marked by an often heartbreaking sense of humor. Ages 9-14. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Publishers Weekly
In this novel based on a real 11-year-old who lost her mother to fever and was deposited with relatives in St. Louis, "vivid historical detail and descriptive prose fuel the narrative," wrote PW. "Adaline possesses a wisdom marked by an often heartbreaking sense of humor." Ages 9-12. (June) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
This historical novel tells the story of Kit Carson's daughter Adaline. Carson did have a daughter with an Arapaho woman, but little is known of her after she was sent to live with relatives in St. Louis. In Osborne's vision, she is an intelligent, strong, and determined young woman who refuses to accept her life as a little better than a slave. When she believes her father is not coming back, she runs away. Adaline's struggle to survive along the river is realistic, but more appealing to readers is her struggle to resist the dog she finds in the woods. She accepts its company, even as she declares, "I ain't going to love him." Readers will feel her pain when she must leave the dog behind in order to get her work on a steamboat going upriver. Kit Carson's reappearance after the steamboat explodes is a trifle convenient, but overall this is a solid and artistic historical fiction. Genre: Historical Fiction/Survival 2000, Scholastic, 170 pp., $16.95. Ages 12 up. Reviewer: Ellen A Greever; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-Loosely rooted in the historical presence of one of the West's well-known scouts, Adaline Falling Star tells the fictional account of Kit Carson and his daughter, Adaline. Called to help lead an expedition under General John C. Fremont, Carson leaves his daughter in St. Louis, Missouri with his cousin, a school teacher, believing that the man and his family will offer Adaline an education as well as a home since her Arapaho mother died of cholera. But Carson's cousin didn't know that Adaline was a "half-breed," and he is disgusted by her. Believing her to be mute and stupid, Cousin Silas makes Adaline his slave both in the classroom and in his home while his family works hard at "washing the stain of Indian blood" out of Adaline. With the help of the family's African-American slave, Adaline decides to run away to find her father. Her exciting adventures will absorb listeners. Elaina Erika Davis's reading of Mary Pope Osborne's book (Scholastic, 2000) captures Adaline's spunk and tenacity. Her child-like tone adds authenticity to the first-person narration. Be advised that some organizations have cautioned against the authenticity of the plot, declaring that Osborne did not accurately portray Arapaho traditions and customs. For example, Adaline slashes her body after her mother dies; however, children did not practice this form of grief ritual in the Arapaho tribe. Although listeners will enjoy the plot, carefully consider adding this title to your collection.-Sarah Prielipp, Chippewa River District Library, Mt. Pleasant, MI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807204306
Publisher:
Random House Audio Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/28/2001
Edition description:
Unabridged, 2 Cassettes, 2 hrs. 40 min.
Product dimensions:
4.46(w) x 7.08(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Perhaps best known for her Magic Tree House series (Listening Library) Mary Pope Osborne is the author of many distinguished books, in almost every genre. A past president of the Author's Guild, she lives in New York City with her husband, Will.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Goshen, Connecticut
Date of Birth:
May 20, 1949
Place of Birth:
Fort Sill, Oklahoma
Education:
B.A., University of North Carolina
Website:
http://www.marypopeosborne.com

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Adaline Falling Star 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was awesome!!! I loved how Adaline was allowed to keep the dog because she grew to close to it!! This book was sad at times but FANTASTIC!!!! 5 STARS!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
wow, this book was really good. It was sad that the kids were kind of prejudice of her. But the overall story was awesome:)
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's one of my favorite stories ever!!! This book is the greatest--a must read!!!!!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is one of my all time favorutes! I would recomend it to any one who likes to read. This story made me apprieciate every one around me a lot more, including my dog! Read this book and you will agree!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite Mary Pope Osborne book. A great story about a young Native-American girl's hard life. Her mother died and her father at war. Adaline's sent to live with cousins who despise her because of her color. A truely touching story.