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Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction
     

Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction

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by Alex Kirlik
 

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ISBN-10: 0195171829

ISBN-13: 9780195171822

Pub. Date: 03/03/2006

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

For today's knowledge workers, computer displays, from the desktop to the cockpit, provide the lens through which the work environment is known. Lacking a scientific foundation to systematically analyze and model these situations, it is hardly surprising that many workers complain of "information overload, " while others complain of the difficulty of maintaining

Overview

For today's knowledge workers, computer displays, from the desktop to the cockpit, provide the lens through which the work environment is known. Lacking a scientific foundation to systematically analyze and model these situations, it is hardly surprising that many workers complain of "information overload, " while others complain of the difficulty of maintaining "situation awareness."

Most research attempting to address these problems has resulted in largely qualitative frameworks such as cognitive systems engineering, naturalistic decision making, distributed and embodied cognition, cognitive work analysis, and resilience engineering. In contrast, the research reflected in this book revives the ideas of a pioneering psychological theorist, Egon Brunswik, who was ahead of his time in calling attention to the need to rigorously investigate cognition in representatively designed experiments, and to formally model the causal dependencies spanning across integrated, human-environment systems.

This research also significantly extends Brunswik's original concepts, often drawing upon modem cognitive-ecological approaches such as Gigerenzer's ecological rationality and Anderson's rational analysis. The quantitative models presented in this book are typically diagnostic of both breakdowns in human-technology interaction and design or training interventions addressing these breakdowns. This book will be of interest to researchers, students, and practitioners in cognitive science and engineering, human factors, human-computer interaction, judgment and decision making and sociotechnical systems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195171822
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
03/03/2006
Series:
Human Technology Interaction Series
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 7.10(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Foreword K. R. Hammond vii

Contributors xv

I Background and Motivation

1 Cognitive Engineering: Toward a Workable Concept of Mind Alex Kirlik 3

2 Introduction to Brunswikian Theory and Method William M. Goldstein 10

II Technological Interfaces

Introduction Alex Kirlik 27

3 Knowledge versus Execution in Dynamic Judgment Tasks Ann M. Bisantz Alex Kirlik Neff Walker Arthur D. Fisk. Paul Gay Donita Phipps 29

4 Understanding the Effects of Computer Displays and Time Pressure on the Performance of Distributed Teams Leonard Adelman Cedric Yeo Sheryl L Miller 43

5 Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill William J. Horrey Christopher D. Wickens Richard Strauss Alex Kirlik Thomas R. Stewart 55

6 Applying the Multivariate Lens Model to Fault Diagnosis Pratik D. Jha Ann M. Bisantz 71

III Automation and Decision Aiding

Introduction Alex Kirlik 89

7 Measuring the Fit between Human Judgments and Alerting Systems: A Study of Collision Detection in Aviation Amy R. Pritchett Ann M. Bisantz 91

8 Trust, Automation, and Feedback: An Integrated Approach Younho Seong Ann M. Bisantz Cordon J. Cattie 105

9 Human-Automated Judgment Learning: Enhancing Interaction with Automated Judgment Systems Ellen J. Bass Amy R. Pritchett 114

IV Alternatives to Compensatory Modeling

Introduction Alex Kirlik 129

10 Inferring Fast and Frugal Heuristics from Human Judgment Data Ling Rothrock Alex Kirlik 131

11 Viewing Training through a Fuzzy Lens Gwendolyn E. Campbell Wendi L. Van Buskirk Amy E. Bolton 149

12 Achieving Coherence: Meeting New Cognitive Demands inTechnological Systems Kathleen L. Mosier Shane T. McCauley 163

V Into the Field: Vicarious Functioning in Action

Introduction Alex Kirlik 177

13 What Makes Vicarious Functioning Work? Exploring the Geometry of Human-Technology Interaction Asaf Degani Michael Shafto Alex Kirlik 179

14 Understanding the Determinants of Adaptive Behavior in a Modern Airline Cockpit Stephen M. Casner 197

15 Abstracting Situated Action: Implications for Cognitive Modeling and interface Design Alex Kirlik 212

VI Ecological Analysis Meets Computational Cognitive Modeling

Introduction Alex Kirlik 227

16 The Emerging Rapprochement between Cognitive and Ecological Analyses Wayne D. Cray 230

17 The Use of Proximal Information Scent to Forage for Distal Content on the World Wide Web Peter Pirolli 247

18 Kilograms Matter: Rational Analysis, Ecological Rationality, and Closed-Loop Modeling of Interactive Cognition and Behavior Michael D. Byrne Alex Kirlik Chris S. Fick 267

VII Reflections and Future Directions

19 Reflections from a Judgment and Decision Making Perspective Terry Connolly 287

20 Reflections from a Cognitive Engineering and Human Factors Perspective Kim J. Vicente 292

Name Index 297

Subject Index 303

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