Addie on the Inside by James Howe, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Addie on the Inside

Addie on the Inside

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by James Howe
     
 

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In this “artfully crafted” (Publishers Weekly) companion to the bestselling The Misfits and Totally Joe, Addie Carle confronts labels, loss, and what it means to grow up.

The Gang of Five is back in this third story from Paintbrush Falls. Addie Carle, the only girl in the group of friends is outspoken, opinionated, and

Overview

In this “artfully crafted” (Publishers Weekly) companion to the bestselling The Misfits and Totally Joe, Addie Carle confronts labels, loss, and what it means to grow up.

The Gang of Five is back in this third story from Paintbrush Falls. Addie Carle, the only girl in the group of friends is outspoken, opinionated, and sometimes…just a bit obnoxious.

But as seventh grade progresses, Addie’s not so sure anymore about who she is. It seems her tough exterior is just a little too tough and that doesn’t help her deal with the turmoil she feels on the inside as she faces the pains of growing up.

Told in elegant, accessible verse, ADDIE ON THE INSIDE gives readers a look at a strong, smart, and sensitive girl struggling with the box society wants to put her in. Addie confronts experiences many readers will relate to: the loss of a beloved pet, first heartbreak, teasing…but also, friendship, love, and a growing confidence in one’s self.

You Are Who They Say You Are

They say in the seventh grade
you are who they say you are,
but how can that be true?

How can I be a /Godzilla-girl /lezzie loser /know-it-all/
big-mouth /beanpole /string bean/ freaky tall/
fall-down /spaz attack /brainiac /maniac/
hopeless nerd /*bad word*/brown-nosing /teacher’s pet/
showing off /just to get
attention –
oh,
and did I mention:
flat-chested…

How can I be all that?
It’s too many things to be.
How can I be all that and
still be true to the real me
while everyone is saying:

This
is
who
you
are.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Written in narrative verse that has the rhythm and punch of spoken-word poetry, this companion to The Misfits and Totally Joe intimately conveys the internal conflicts of seventh-grader Addie, whose outspokenness makes her a target for ridicule at school. As bold and confident as she may appear, Addie is filled with worries both external ("I worry how in the world/ the world will ever be okay. Then/ I turn off my alarm/ and get on with the day") and internal, particularly regarding her relationships with her boyfriend, DuShawn, and her catty former friend, Becca. Addie's attempts to organize a Day of Silence don't go as planned, but she gains support in unexpected places and, as someone seldom at a loss for words, she finds her self-imposed quiet revelatory. Howe's artfully crafted lines show Addie's intelligence and wit, and his imagery evokes the aura of sadness surrounding "this purgatory of/ the middle school years/ when so many things/ that never mattered before/ and will never matter again/ matter." Readers will empathize with Addie's anguish and admire her courage to keep fighting. Ages 10–14. (July)
From the Publisher
"Written in narrative verse that has the rhythm and punch of spoken-word poetry, this companion to The Misfits and Totally Joe intimately conveys the internal conflicts of seventh-grader Addie…Howe's artfully crafted lines show Addie's intelligence and wit, and his imagery evokes the aura of sadness surrounding "this purgatory of/ the middle school years/ when so many things/ that never mattered before/ and will never matter again/ matter." Readers will empathize with Addie's anguish and admire her courage to keep fighting."

Publishers Weekly, May 16, 2011, *STAR

"Told entirely in verse, the story follows 13-year-old Addie’s struggles to define herself according to her own terms. Through her poems, Addie reflects on her life and life in general: her first boyfriend, what it means to be accepted and her endeavors to promote equality.... Her forthright observations address serious topics with a maturity beyond her age.... Readers will agree when, in the triumphant final poem, an assured Addie proclaims: “I am a girl who knows enough / to know this life is mine.”

—KIRKUS REVIEWS, June 1, 2011

“Howe explores the tender thrills and insecurities of early adolescence in first-person poems….Howe maintains a consistent voice…without compromising the heartfelt urgency of Addie’s words. This exploration of Addie’s struggles and reconciliations makes a strong addition to its companion titles and stands on its own as a compelling and moving story about growing up and out.”

Booklist, July 2011

“Howe completely captures what it is like to be a 13-year-old girl–the ups and downs, the emotional tightrope, the push/pull between childhood and growing up, and the power of gossip and school cliques. Addie negotiates the corridors of middle school with thoughtful determination; she’s a young woman with a lot to say. Add this fine novel to the growing list of novels in verse.”

School Library Journal, August 2011, *STAR

Children's Literature - Patrice Belotte
On the outside, Addie is a normal seventh grade girl with an extra dose of confidence. Well, at least that's how it seems. She speaks up, asks questions, says what everyone else is thinking but is too afraid to say out loud. When the teacher lets three minutes go by, and the sound of chirping crickets signal that no one has the answer, Addie is the student who is called upon. She will know the answer, or at least have a good enough response to get the class discussion back on track. Yet again, that is all on the outside. Written as a companion to the The Misfits, Howe goes inside the mind of Addie, and touches upon all of the unspeakably difficult things everyone goes through in seventh grade. Told through a series of poems, and divided into sections that catalogue her experiences, Addie's thoughts lend themselves to a subtle narrative that is emotional and relatable. Bobby, Skeezie, and Joe find a place amongst another cast of typical seventh grade characters to tackle subjects such as adolescent love, self-doubt, bullying, race, and social cliques. Addie's poems vary in length, diction, and rhythm—each one consciously formatted to express every ounce of her emotionally-developing young mind. Young readers will connect to Addie's journey and poetry. Parents and teachers will find her story poignant and a catalyst for important conversations with students and children through the formative middle school years. Reviewer: Patrice Belotte
School Library Journal
Gr 6–8—This companion to The Misfits (2001) and Totally Joe (2005, both S & S) focuses on Addie Carle, an outspoken, intelligent girl who is worried about injustice and "how in the world, the world will ever be okay." She always speaks her mind, which doesn't endear her to her fellow classmates and leads to gossip and ridicule. She is an earnest protagonist who doesn't see any other way to be. But seventh grade is becoming a turning point in her life. Her first boyfriend likes her for who she is but is eventually overwhelmed by her; a childhood friend returns and is now part of the popular group; she realizes that adults also have inner lives and emotions; and she loses a beloved pet. She wonders if she should pay more attention to what she wears or says, but questions whether wearing the "in" shoes would really change anything. Then when Addie participates in the National Day of Silence in support of GLBT teens, she begins to notice the students who are always silent ("while I talk and talk and the loud ones shout and shove") and is surprised when she discovers that she can be quiet for a change. And she finds support from a surprising source. Howe completely captures what it is like to be a 13-year-old girl—the ups and downs, the emotional tightrope, the push/pull between childhood and growing up, and the power of gossip and school cliques. Addie negotiates the corridors of middle school with thoughtful determination; she's a young woman with a lot to say. Add this fine novel to the growing list of novels in verse.—Terrie Dorio, Santa Monica Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews

In this companion novel, Howe explores the interior life of the most outspoken member of the "Gang of Five" fromThe MisfitsandTotally Joe(2001, 2005).

Told entirely in verse, the story follows 13-year-old Addie's struggles to define herself according to her own terms. Through her poems, Addie reflects on her life and life in general: her first boyfriend, what it means to be accepted and her endeavors to promote equality. Addie is at her most fragile when she examines her relationship with her boyfriend and the cruel behavior of her former best friend. Her forthright observations address serious topics with a maturity beyond her age. She contemplates the tragedy of teen suicide in "What If" and decries the practice of forced marriages in "What We Don't Know," stating "...And their mothers / have no power to change how it goes. They too / have been beaten and raped, sold and traded like / disposable goods, owned by men, while the only thing / they own is their misery..." Addie's voice gains confidence when she takes on the role of an advocate, as when she reveals her reasons for forming the GSA (Gay Straight Alliance) at school in "No One is Free When Others Are Oppressed (A Button on My Backpack)." Bolstered by the sage advice of her grandmother, Addie charts a steady course through her turbulent seventh-grade year.

Readers will agree when, in the triumphant finalpoem, an assured Addie proclaims: "I am a girl who knows enough / to know this life is mine." (author's note)(Verse novel. 11-14)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416913856
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
07/24/2012
Series:
Misfits Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
247,606
Product dimensions:
5.26(w) x 7.46(h) x 0.66(d)
Lexile:
NP (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Read an Excerpt

You Are Who They Say You Are

They say in the seventh grade
you are who they say you are,
but how can that be true?

How can I be a
Godzilla-girl
lezzie loser
know-it-all
big mouth
beanpole
string bean
freaky tall
fall-down
spaz attack
brainiac
maniac
hopeless nerd
*bad word*
brown-nosing
teacher’s pet
showing off
just to get
attention—
oh,
and did I
mention:
flat-chested
(that’s true)
badly dressed
(says you)
social climber
(such a lie)
rabble-rouser
(well, I try)
tree-hugging
tofu-eating
button-wearing
sign-waving
slogan-shouting
protest-marching
troublemaking
hippie-dippy
throwback
to another
time and place?

How can I be all that?
It’s too many things to be.
How can I be all that and
still be true to the real me
while everyone is saying:

This
is
who
you
are.

© 2011 James Howe

Meet the Author

James Howe is the author of more than eighty books for young readers, including the modern classic Bunnicula and its highly popular sequels. In 2001, Howe published The Misfits, which was the inspiration for the national movement known as No Name-Calling Week (NoNameCallingWeek.org), an event observed by thousands of middle and elementary schools annually. Totally Joe and Addie on the Inside are both companion novels to The Misfits, and Howe’s many other books for children from preschool through teens frequently deal with the acceptance of difference and being true to oneself.

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