Addie on the Inside [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this “artfully crafted” (Publishers Weekly) companion to the bestselling The Misfits and Totally Joe, Addie Carle confronts labels, loss, and what it means to grow up.

The Gang of Five is back in this third story from Paintbrush Falls. Addie Carle, the only girl in the group of friends is outspoken, opinionated, and sometimes…just a bit obnoxious.

But as seventh grade ...
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Addie on the Inside

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Overview

In this “artfully crafted” (Publishers Weekly) companion to the bestselling The Misfits and Totally Joe, Addie Carle confronts labels, loss, and what it means to grow up.

The Gang of Five is back in this third story from Paintbrush Falls. Addie Carle, the only girl in the group of friends is outspoken, opinionated, and sometimes…just a bit obnoxious.

But as seventh grade progresses, Addie’s not so sure anymore about who she is. It seems her tough exterior is just a little too tough and that doesn’t help her deal with the turmoil she feels on the inside as she faces the pains of growing up.

Told in elegant, accessible verse, ADDIE ON THE INSIDE gives readers a look at a strong, smart, and sensitive girl struggling with the box society wants to put her in. Addie confronts experiences many readers will relate to: the loss of a beloved pet, first heartbreak, teasing…but also, friendship, love, and a growing confidence in one’s self.

You Are Who They Say You Are

They say in the seventh grade
you are who they say you are,
but how can that be true?

How can I be a /Godzilla-girl /lezzie loser /know-it-all/
big-mouth /beanpole /string bean/ freaky tall/
fall-down /spaz attack /brainiac /maniac/
hopeless nerd /*bad word*/brown-nosing /teacher’s pet/
showing off /just to get
attention –
oh,
and did I mention:
flat-chested…

How can I be all that?
It’s too many things to be.
How can I be all that and
still be true to the real me
while everyone is saying:

This
is
who
you
are.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Written in narrative verse that has the rhythm and punch of spoken-word poetry, this companion to The Misfits and Totally Joe intimately conveys the internal conflicts of seventh-grader Addie, whose outspokenness makes her a target for ridicule at school. As bold and confident as she may appear, Addie is filled with worries both external ("I worry how in the world/ the world will ever be okay. Then/ I turn off my alarm/ and get on with the day") and internal, particularly regarding her relationships with her boyfriend, DuShawn, and her catty former friend, Becca. Addie's attempts to organize a Day of Silence don't go as planned, but she gains support in unexpected places and, as someone seldom at a loss for words, she finds her self-imposed quiet revelatory. Howe's artfully crafted lines show Addie's intelligence and wit, and his imagery evokes the aura of sadness surrounding "this purgatory of/ the middle school years/ when so many things/ that never mattered before/ and will never matter again/ matter." Readers will empathize with Addie's anguish and admire her courage to keep fighting. Ages 10–14. (July)
From the Publisher
"Written in narrative verse that has the rhythm and punch of spoken-word poetry, this companion to The Misfits and Totally Joe intimately conveys the internal conflicts of seventh-grader Addie…Howe's artfully crafted lines show Addie's intelligence and wit, and his imagery evokes the aura of sadness surrounding "this purgatory of/ the middle school years/ when so many things/ that never mattered before/ and will never matter again/ matter." Readers will empathize with Addie's anguish and admire her courage to keep fighting."

--Publishers Weekly, May 16, 2011, *STAR

"Told entirely in verse, the story follows 13-year-old Addie’s struggles to define herself according to her own terms. Through her poems, Addie reflects on her life and life in general: her first boyfriend, what it means to be accepted and her endeavors to promote equality.... Her forthright observations address serious topics with a maturity beyond her age.... Readers will agree when, in the triumphant final poem, an assured Addie proclaims: “I am a girl who knows enough / to know this life is mine.”

--KIRKUS REVIEWS, June 1, 2011

“Howe explores the tender thrills and insecurities of early adolescence in first-person poems….Howe maintains a consistent voice…without compromising the heartfelt urgency of Addie’s words. This exploration of Addie’s struggles and reconciliations makes a strong addition to its companion titles and stands on its own as a compelling and moving story about growing up and out.”

--Booklist, July 2011

“Howe completely captures what it is like to be a 13-year-old girl–the ups and downs, the emotional tightrope, the push/pull between childhood and growing up, and the power of gossip and school cliques. Addie negotiates the corridors of middle school with thoughtful determination; she’s a young woman with a lot to say. Add this fine novel to the growing list of novels in verse.”

--School Library Journal, August 2011, *STAR

Children's Literature - Patrice Belotte
On the outside, Addie is a normal seventh grade girl with an extra dose of confidence. Well, at least that's how it seems. She speaks up, asks questions, says what everyone else is thinking but is too afraid to say out loud. When the teacher lets three minutes go by, and the sound of chirping crickets signal that no one has the answer, Addie is the student who is called upon. She will know the answer, or at least have a good enough response to get the class discussion back on track. Yet again, that is all on the outside. Written as a companion to the The Misfits, Howe goes inside the mind of Addie, and touches upon all of the unspeakably difficult things everyone goes through in seventh grade. Told through a series of poems, and divided into sections that catalogue her experiences, Addie's thoughts lend themselves to a subtle narrative that is emotional and relatable. Bobby, Skeezie, and Joe find a place amongst another cast of typical seventh grade characters to tackle subjects such as adolescent love, self-doubt, bullying, race, and social cliques. Addie's poems vary in length, diction, and rhythm—each one consciously formatted to express every ounce of her emotionally-developing young mind. Young readers will connect to Addie's journey and poetry. Parents and teachers will find her story poignant and a catalyst for important conversations with students and children through the formative middle school years. Reviewer: Patrice Belotte
School Library Journal
Gr 6–8—This companion to The Misfits (2001) and Totally Joe (2005, both S & S) focuses on Addie Carle, an outspoken, intelligent girl who is worried about injustice and "how in the world, the world will ever be okay." She always speaks her mind, which doesn't endear her to her fellow classmates and leads to gossip and ridicule. She is an earnest protagonist who doesn't see any other way to be. But seventh grade is becoming a turning point in her life. Her first boyfriend likes her for who she is but is eventually overwhelmed by her; a childhood friend returns and is now part of the popular group; she realizes that adults also have inner lives and emotions; and she loses a beloved pet. She wonders if she should pay more attention to what she wears or says, but questions whether wearing the "in" shoes would really change anything. Then when Addie participates in the National Day of Silence in support of GLBT teens, she begins to notice the students who are always silent ("while I talk and talk and the loud ones shout and shove") and is surprised when she discovers that she can be quiet for a change. And she finds support from a surprising source. Howe completely captures what it is like to be a 13-year-old girl—the ups and downs, the emotional tightrope, the push/pull between childhood and growing up, and the power of gossip and school cliques. Addie negotiates the corridors of middle school with thoughtful determination; she's a young woman with a lot to say. Add this fine novel to the growing list of novels in verse.—Terrie Dorio, Santa Monica Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews

In this companion novel, Howe explores the interior life of the most outspoken member of the "Gang of Five" fromThe MisfitsandTotally Joe(2001, 2005).

Told entirely in verse, the story follows 13-year-old Addie's struggles to define herself according to her own terms. Through her poems, Addie reflects on her life and life in general: her first boyfriend, what it means to be accepted and her endeavors to promote equality. Addie is at her most fragile when she examines her relationship with her boyfriend and the cruel behavior of her former best friend. Her forthright observations address serious topics with a maturity beyond her age. She contemplates the tragedy of teen suicide in "What If" and decries the practice of forced marriages in "What We Don't Know," stating "...And their mothers / have no power to change how it goes. They too / have been beaten and raped, sold and traded like / disposable goods, owned by men, while the only thing / they own is their misery..." Addie's voice gains confidence when she takes on the role of an advocate, as when she reveals her reasons for forming the GSA (Gay Straight Alliance) at school in "No One is Free When Others Are Oppressed (A Button on My Backpack)." Bolstered by the sage advice of her grandmother, Addie charts a steady course through her turbulent seventh-grade year.

Readers will agree when, in the triumphant finalpoem, an assured Addie proclaims: "I am a girl who knows enough / to know this life is mine." (author's note)(Verse novel. 11-14)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442423817
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 11/1/2011
  • Series: Misfits
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 229,941
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

James Howe is the author of more than eighty books for young readers, including the modern classic Bunnicula and its highly popular sequels. In 2001, Howe published The Misfits, which was the inspiration for the national movement known as No Name-Calling Week (NoNameCallingWeek.org), an event observed by thousands of middle and elementary schools annually. Totally Joe and Addie on the Inside are both companion novels to The Misfits, and Howe’s many other books for children from preschool through teens frequently deal with the acceptance of difference and being true to oneself.
James Howe is the author of more than ninety books for young readers, including the modern classic Bunnicula and its highly popular sequels. In 2001, Howe published The Misfits, the story of four outcast seventh-graders who try to end name-calling in their school. The Misfits is now widely read and studied in middle schools throughout the country, and was the inspiration for the national movement known as No Name-Calling Week (NoNameCallingWeek.org), an event observed by thousands of middle and elementary schools annually. There are three companion novels to The Misfits: Totally Joe (2005), Addie on the Inside (2011), and Also Known as Elvis (2014). Howe’s many other books for children from preschool through teens frequently deal with the acceptance of difference and being true to oneself. Visit him online at JamesHowe.com.
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Read an Excerpt


You Are Who They Say You Are

They say in the seventh grade
you are who they say you are,
but how can that be true?

How can I be a
Godzilla-girl
lezzie loser
know-it-all
big mouth
beanpole
string bean
freaky tall
fall-down
spaz attack
brainiac
maniac
hopeless nerd
*bad word*
brown-nosing
teacher’s pet
showing off
just to get
attention—
oh,
and did I
mention:
flat-chested
(that’s true)
badly dressed
(says you)
social climber
(such a lie)
rabble-rouser
(well, I try)
tree-hugging
tofu-eating
button-wearing
sign-waving
slogan-shouting
protest-marching
troublemaking
hippie-dippy
throwback
to another
time and place?

How can I be all that?
It’s too many things to be.
How can I be all that and
still be true to the real me
while everyone is saying:

This
is
who
you
are.

© 2011 James Howe

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(3)

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Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Recommended for all Middle School Classrooms

    I loved the way this was written in chunks in verse. This is one of those books every teacher needs to have on their shelves. The book is a great look at middle school life and how students bully each other without thinking they are bullying. It is a great look at how words hurt and how one student, Addie, copes with it. I loved Addie's character. She starts off sounding as if she has a shell built around her and doesn't care what others think about her. Slowly the layers are peeled away so that we can see her true heart. This should be mandatory reading for all students.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 26, 2011

    Interesting Experiment

    Told through poetry, Addie on the Inside is all about Addie Carle, a young woman on a mission to make the world a better place. She's having to deal with a lot of stuff- lack of development physically, overabundant development mentally, first boyfriend, fitting in socially, and so many other things. By the end of the book, some things have drastically changed for Addie. However, nothing will ever change her sense of justice and desire to do some good for the world.


    I love that authors are experimenting for young adults and writing in verse. It's a great way to show that self expression can be done in many different ways. That being said, I'm not sure this book was entirely successful. It was a bit difficult to get into the story. Of course, I have not read any of the other books with these characters that preceeded this one, so that may have been part of the problem. Sometimes I felt like Addie didn't read like a girl to me, and to be honest there were times I didnt' really like her at all. I understand her need to champion the causes she believed it, but at times she came across as rather pretentious.


    Addie did seem to soften up some as the book went on, so I began to like her much better towards the end. I guess there were just too many hard edges on her at the beginning of the book. I think is a good book for teens who are activists looking for a kindred spirit. They will certainly find much to admire and possibly emulate. I appreciate the author's experimentation using verse to help get to know Addie better, and as things changed for Addie she because a character I had much more sympathy for her. There are probably a lot of people who will feel really moved by Addie's story, I just wasn't one of them.


    Galley provided by publisher for review.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2013

    I love this author and I love this book!

    I started the series as a book for my school's book club. Now that I've finished, I don't know what to do! I highly recommend this book for anybody looking for one.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    Recommend

    This book is written in verse, which if students haven't been introduced to may seem odd to them. However this is a great read for 7th grade and up. It is about the life of a 7th grade girl and the struggles young girls go through with boys, friends, bullies, ect.... I would certainly use this at the beginning of the year to discuss bullies and other life changing events for kids this age. What sometimes seems so dramatic in their world is usually not all that bad if they talk it out

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2012

    Great!

    This book is a great book. Addie (the main charactor) is a brilliant young lady who is on the un-popular side. She's hiding in her own little corner for most of the book but in the end, opens up to the world, one step at a time. This book has a great way of showing how you can use poetry in an amazing way. A great book for teens and preteens but not for children. This book does have some bad words and boyfriend/girlfriend related content that younger kids don't need to read about.

    Overall, this book should be on everyone's bookshelves. A great book full of every type of emption/feeling.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2014

    Vv

    Hi my name is Addie! My birthday was yesterday!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2015

    Anonymous

    The sample was basically nothing but the prologue which was only a dumb poem, not dumb but said nothing about the main idea of Addie on the inside.How will I know if I'd even like this book it should've given at least the first chapter............:-( :-( :-( :-( BRUH really

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2013

    What about Skeezie?????

    This book is about Addie, the last one was about Joe and the first book was about Bobby. When does Skeezie come in? He's my favorite character!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2013

    Anonymous

    I thought this was a really good book because, it was entertaining and, even though it was a poem, made sense. I liked it because it was sometimes funny, plus you can really feel the character when you read. It is really good!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    how

    Whenever i tap on a book it never lets me read? Does anybody know how to make it stop.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    Awesom book

    I loved this book the last poem in the book was the best it was called i am who i say i am. my second fav is the omg chours

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2012

    Ffgdtdfdhcjhggnvgg

    I love you one direction

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    Looked good

    My mom got this for me at the library. It looked really good! But then i found out that it wasap arranged in poems! I really dont like poetry, so i gave it to my mom to return.


    I-luv-taylor-lautner-and-am-going-to-marry-him-so-back-off Mrs.-Lautner-wannabes-he's-mine

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012

    :)

    I like it, mostly cause it has my nick name in it. I toats know this review isn't any help.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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