Addie's Forever Friend

Addie's Forever Friend

by Laurie Lawlor, Helen Cogancherry
     
 

Addie Mills knows she's not a brave person. She's afraid to learn how to swim, she's nervous around firecrackers, and she's worried that her father will move the family to Dakota, where it's wild and dangerous. Addie's not like her best friend, Eleanor, who can swim like a fish and has daring plans for the Fourth of July. Can Addie and Eleanor be friends forever?  See more details below

Overview

Addie Mills knows she's not a brave person. She's afraid to learn how to swim, she's nervous around firecrackers, and she's worried that her father will move the family to Dakota, where it's wild and dangerous. Addie's not like her best friend, Eleanor, who can swim like a fish and has daring plans for the Fourth of July. Can Addie and Eleanor be friends forever?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Gisela Jernigan
This historical novel is the first of a series of five books about nine-year-old Addie Mills and her family, describing their lives and travels in Iowa and the Dakota Territory of the 1880's. Rather timid compared to her daring best friend Eleanor, Addie learns that she can be brave when it's really necessary. Inspired by the author's own family history, the setting seems realistic and the books would probably appeal to Little House fans.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-4The friendship between two girls growing up in Iowa in the 19th century is depicted in this quaint series entry. Addie is a fearful, nervous childa worrier. Eleanor, on the other hand, is bold, adventurous, and a prankster. This story revolves around Eleanor's attempts to teach Addie to swim in the Mississippi and the havoc created when Eleanor's practical joke on the Fourth of July goes awry. Addie has an opportunity to prove herself braver than she thinks by saving her friend from certain death in the river. Subplots involve Addie's mother's pregnancy, the family's failing farm, and the looming possibility of a move to Dakota in search of land and prosperity. The birth of a baby sister gives dual meaning to the notion of a "forever friend" for Addie. The story ends before readers learn the family's ultimate fate. Cogancherry's sensitive pencil drawings open each brief chapter. This sweet, step-up novel is not a standout, but it will appeal to children who enjoyed the earlier stories about Addie or as an introduction to historical fiction.Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
From Lawlor (Addie's Long Summer, 1992, not reviewed, etc.), another amiable, atmospheric portrait of life in 1880s Iowa. Addie and family are living with Aunt Ida and Uncle Manfred while their farm recovers from flood devastation and their father helps friends homestead in the Dakota Territory. In ten short, easy-to-read chapters, Addie conquers her fear of swimming, with the help of her brave best friend Eleanor; anticipates the birth of a new sibling, who she hopes will be a sister, a "forever friend" as her Aunt Ida puts it; and adjusts to homesickness and the possibility of going west. Addie does get a sister after all, but also realizes her wish for a forever friend in Eleanor. The stories are gentle and heartwarming, and full of authentic detail—warmly evoked in the black-and-white illustrations—and smatterings of drama; Lawlor has a knack for making historical fiction comfortable and relevant to readers.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807501641
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
10/01/1997
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.31(w) x 8.34(h) x 0.65(d)
Lexile:
630L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

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