An Address Upon The Life And Services Of Edward Everett; Delivered Before The Municipal Authorities And Citizens Of Cambridge, February 22, 1865

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ADDRESS. Mr. Mayor, And Gentlemen Of The City Council,— When we were all seeking for some phrase to express our sense of the worth and dignity of the man who has been taken from us, some one, I know not who, had the felicity to ...
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An address upon the life and services of Edward Everett; delivered before the municipal authorities and citizens of Cambridge, February 22, 1865

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
ADDRESS. Mr. Mayor, And Gentlemen Of The City Council,— When we were all seeking for some phrase to express our sense of the worth and dignity of the man who has been taken from us, some one, I know not who, had the felicity to speak of him as the First Citizen of the Republic. I believe the fitness of this appellation has been recognized by the community; and when Mr. Seward, at the seat of government, by order of the President, announced to the whole country the death of Edward Everett, and requested that all honor should be paid to his memory wherever, at home or abroad, the national authority was recognized, all the people said Amen! He belonged, indeed, to the whole country. Science had a claim upon him. In his youth, Poetry marked him for her own. The Fine Arts, in all their forms, recognized in him a devoted student. Public Law, international and constitutional, acknowledged him one of her best interpreters. And, the civilized world over, whatever the differences oflanguage or the laws of naturalization, he was one of the foremost citizens of the Universal Republic of Letters. And yet, Mr. Mayor, you advanced no more than a just claim when you recommended to your brethren of the City Council that Cambridge should assert her privilege of expressing, on this day, by civic and military honors and public speech, the sentiment of the community. Mr. Everett was born in a neighboring town, passed his boyhood in the adjoining city, and at the age of thirteen came to Cambridge to enter ourUniversity. His whole academic life was spent here. In the old meeting-house, now no more, scarce a bow-shot from where we stand, he made his first public appearance, in his graduating oration, at the head of his class. When pastor of the Church in Brattle Street, he was still withi...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780217774000
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 10/14/2010
  • Pages: 18
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.04 (d)

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ADDRESS. Mr. Mayor, And Gentlemen Of The City Council,— When we were all seeking for some phrase to express our sense of the worth and dignity of the man who has been taken from us, some one, I know not who, had the felicity to speak of him as the First Citizen of the Republic. I believe the fitness of this appellation has been recognized by the community; and when Mr. Seward, at the seat of government, by order of the President, announced to the whole country the death of Edward Everett, and requested that all honor should be paid to his memory wherever, at home or abroad, the national authority was recognized, all the people said Amen! He belonged, indeed, to the whole country. Science had a claim upon him. In his youth, Poetry marked him for her own. The Fine Arts, in all their forms, recognized in him a devoted student. Public Law, international and constitutional, acknowledged him one of her best interpreters. And, the civilized world over, whatever the differences oflanguage or the laws of naturalization, he was one of the foremost citizens of the Universal Republic of Letters. And yet, Mr. Mayor, you advanced no more than a just claim when you recommended to your brethren of the City Council that Cambridge should assert her privilege of expressing, on this day, by civic and military honors and public speech, the sentiment of the community. Mr. Everett was born in a neighboring town, passed his boyhood in the adjoining city, and at the age of thirteen came to Cambridge to enter our University. His whole academic life was spent here. In the old meeting-house, now no more, scarce a bow-shot from where we stand, he made his first public appearance, in his graduatingoration, at the head of his class. When pastor of the Church in Brattle Street, he was still withi...
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