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ADHD and Me: What I Learned from Lighting Fires at the Dinner Table
     

ADHD and Me: What I Learned from Lighting Fires at the Dinner Table

4.3 12
by Blake E. S. Taylor, Lara Honos-Webb (Foreword by)
 

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Blake Taylor's mother first suspected he had ADHD when he, at only three years of age, tried to push his infant sister in her carrier off the kitchen table. As time went by, Blake developed a reputation for being hyperactive and impulsive. He launched rockets (accidentally) into neighbor's swimming pools and set off alarms in museums. Blake was diagnosed formally

Overview

Blake Taylor's mother first suspected he had ADHD when he, at only three years of age, tried to push his infant sister in her carrier off the kitchen table. As time went by, Blake developed a reputation for being hyperactive and impulsive. He launched rockets (accidentally) into neighbor's swimming pools and set off alarms in museums. Blake was diagnosed formally with ADHD when he was five years old. In ADHD and Me, he tells about the next twelve years as he learns to live with both the good and bad sides of life with ADHD.

Blake's memoir offers, for the first time, a young person's account of what it's like to live and grow up with this common condition. Join Blake as he foils bullies, confronts unfair teachers, struggles with distraction and disorganization on exams, and goes sailing out-of-bounds and ends up with a boatload of spiders. It will be an inspiration and companion to the thousands of others like him who must find a way to thrive with a different perspective than many of us. The book features an introduction by psychologist Lara Honos-Webb, author of The Gift of ADHD, and a leading advocate for kids with ADHD.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Blake Taylor's book, ADHD and Me, is stereotype-busting from the outset. How can a whirlwind of a boy, now young man, like Blake, write such a lucid, disclosing, revealing, and, above all, insightful book? The book blends extremely personal descriptions of situations, binds, conflicts, and realities, some humorous and some deadly serious, with extremely useful practical information on how to cope with and overcome the often-devastating symptoms and impairments related to ADHD. Most of all, the book serves to humanize a label and a condition that are too frequently viewed with skepticism and even derision. This is a must-read for people of all ages who are concerned with ADHD, mental illness, treatment, coping, and stigma.
—Stephen P. Hinshaw, professor and chair of the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley

Taylor offers readers an inside look at how he gets along on a daily basis as well as a guide for people in the same situation … Students struggling with ADHD and their parents will benefit from the author’s insights.
Library Journal, 15 November 2007

Taylor speaks to fellow teens and their families with an authority few experts can muster.
Publishers Weekly, 17 November 2007

Library Journal

In this memoir of life with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Taylor offers readers an inside look at how he gets along on a daily basis as well as a guide for people in the same situation. He is a recent high school graduate, and part of the allure of his account is in finding out how someone with ADHD managed to write a book in the first place. Each chapter covers specific issues such as being bullied, getting organized, and feeling isolated. After relating a personal experience and his handling of it, Taylor advises readers on what to do should they find themselves in the same place. He also shares his perspective on coping with ADHD and speaks to what can be learned. The foreword by Lara Honos-Webb (The Gift of ADHD: How To Transform Your Child's Problems into Strengths) supports Taylor's central theme that while ADHD needs to be recognized and treated, it does not entirely define a person, whose strengths should be recognized. Students struggling with ADHD and their parents will benefit from the author's insights. Recommended for public and high school libraries.
—Lisa M. Jordan

School Library Journal

Adult/High School -Readers looking for inside information about attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder need look no further. In a straightforward, simple manner, Taylor describes how he has lived successfully for 18 years with ADHD. He opens with a painful memory of being tied to a chair with a bungee cord in order to sit still long enough to eat his dinner. Each chapter begins with a recollection of a different period in his life, how his ADHD framed it, and what he learned from the experience that helped him develop the skills to achieve, and ends with a list of "solutions." What makes these practical tips particularly useful is that they are recommendations that Taylor has used. He includes suggestions for dealing with distraction, hyperactivity, and bullies. He also addresses making friends; staying organized; and coping with discrimination, social anxiety, and rules. It is obvious that the author, a college freshman, had great parental and medical support throughout his childhood; it was sad to read that some of his dealings with the educational community were less positive.-Joanne Ligamari, Rio Linda School District, Sacramento, CA

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781572245228
Publisher:
New Harbinger Publications
Publication date:
02/02/2008
Series:
Unassigned Series
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
284,630
Product dimensions:
6.18(w) x 10.92(h) x 0.42(d)

Meet the Author

Blake E. S. Taylor, a first-year medical student at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, is the youngest person to write about living with ADHD. At seventeen years of age, he wrote his memoir ADHD and Me. Taylor is a a national advocate for young people with the condition.

Taylor has appeared on CNN.com’s Young People Who Rock, National Public Radio, and San Francisco’s ABC7 News, FOX Mornings at 2, CBS 5 Bay Area People, KCBS NewsRadio with Rebecca Corral. He has been featured by the Associated Press, the San Francisco Chronicle, and in a cover story in ADDitude magazine. His book, currently in its fourth printing, has been translated into Chinese, Korean, Dutch, and Polish.

Read Blake's blog at teenDailyStrength.com.

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ADHD and Me: What I Learned from Lighting Fires at the Dinner Table 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Christine-Boston More than 1 year ago
The text along the top of the cover promises a book that is, among other things, brilliant, engaging and funny. It is a first person account of ADHD from the point of view of a 17 year old boy. It is concise, clearly written, full of coping tips and explanations about the illness, interwoven with stories from when the author was younger. He explains why he did did the things he did. I just read "The Quiet Room", a first person view of schizophrenia. The author detailed her inner most feelings, thoughts, emotions, pain and actions. I felt like I learned about the illness by being with her. It was fascinating. I also enjoyed "Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's" which offers a similar experience. This is book is more for people who want to understand and cope with the illness in general.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
qzlynne More than 1 year ago
Thank you to Blake Taylor for sharing these stories. My son was diagnosed at the age of 3, but showed signs and has had difficulties since the age of 4 months. We have struggled for 8 years, trying to understand "Why does he do that?? He knows it upsets people" and "Cant you just sit down for 5 minutes?" I cried and cried after reading the first several stories, just realizing what he has been going through. Very enlightening. It has changed every aspect of how I approach problems and react to his impulses and high energy. It has changed my life and my relationship with my sons. I bought a copy for every family member and his teachers!
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ParentsDigest_Pam More than 1 year ago
Many of my friends have children with ADHD, and I never felt like I fully understood it. After reading this book, I feel like I have a grasp on how to handle the ADHD that many people around me deal with. Definitely a worthy read.

No time to read the whole book? Check out the 8 page summary at parentsdigest.com
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book helped me understand my own 17 year old son who has ADhD. I think the hardest thing for anyone to understand about a child with ADhD is the fact that what makes that child so different than the other kids is NOT the hyperactivity, BUT the way they think. A child with ADhD does not think the way an average child thinks. This book helps you get inside the head of a teenager with ADhD and understand what he was thinking. Very well written and I highly recommend everyone who knows someone with ADhD to read it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
WOW!!! This book gave me a whole new perspective of ADHD. It helped me view some of my son's behaviors so differently. I additional purchased two more books. One to be passed to his teachers every year, and another for friends and family. I highly recommend the same for other familes that have ADHD in their loved ones.