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The Adirondack Atlas: A Geographic Portrait of the Adirondack Park / Edition 1
     

The Adirondack Atlas: A Geographic Portrait of the Adirondack Park / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Jerry B. Jenkins
 

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ISBN-10: 0815607571

ISBN-13: 9780815607571

Pub. Date: 06/28/2004

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

With its detailed coverage of a broad array of subjects, this ambitious project of the Wildlife Conservation Society will interest all who know the Adirondack Park. The atlas is made up of entries that contain meticulously drawn thematic maps that provide a detailed visual aid to the accompanying text. The subjects covered in this manner include the environments of

Overview

With its detailed coverage of a broad array of subjects, this ambitious project of the Wildlife Conservation Society will interest all who know the Adirondack Park. The atlas is made up of entries that contain meticulously drawn thematic maps that provide a detailed visual aid to the accompanying text. The subjects covered in this manner include the environments of the park; its animals and plants; the history of wars, settlement, and industry; forest change; vital statistics, schools and colleges, changing towns; outdoor recreation; and pollution and wastes. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780815607571
Publisher:
Syracuse University Press
Publication date:
06/28/2004
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
900,714
Product dimensions:
9.04(w) x 11.66(h) x 0.81(d)

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The Adirondack Atlas: A Geographic Portrait of the Adirondack Park 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My interest in the environment and USA conservation history caused me to buy this atlas. The areas covered are informative with maps. Whether one agrees or not with some of the conclusions, or the way some of the studies were conducted does not seem to make a difference, as the atlas reveals much of what is of concern to conservationists. It can also serve as a model of how to create an atlas based on conervation studies, and the sort of studies that can help conservationists, or what is of interest to conservationists. What also makes the atlas interesting is that it has some 17th Century historical information in it.