The Adolescent Psychotherapy Progress Notes Planner (Practice Planners Series) / Edition 2

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Overview

The Adolescent Psychotherapy Progress Notes Planner, Second Edition contains complete prewritten session and patient presentation descriptions for each behavioral problem in The Adolescent Psychotherapy Treatment Planner, Third Edition. The prewritten progress notes can be easily and quickly adapted to fit a particular client need or treatment situation.

This time-saving sourcebook provides pre-written progress notes for each presenting problem in the best-selling book The Adolescent Psychotherapy Treatment Planner, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471459798
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/19/2003
  • Series: PracticePlanners Series , #159
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 8.52 (w) x 10.96 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Read an Excerpt


The Adolescent Psychotherapy Progress Notes Planner



By Arthur E. Jongsma, Jr. L. Mark Peterson William P. McInnis David J. Berghuis


John Wiley & Sons


Copyright © 2003

Arthur E. Jongsma, Jr., L. Mark Peterson, William P. McInnis, David J. Berghuis
All right reserved.



ISBN: 0-471-45979-8



Chapter One


ACADEMIC UNDERACHIEVEMENT


CLIENT PRESENTATION

1. Academic Underachievement (1)

A. The client's teachers and parents reported a history of academic performance that is
below the expected level given the client's measured intelligence or performance on
standardized achievement tests.

B. The client verbally admitted that his/her current academic performance is below
his/her expected level of functioning.

C. The client has started to assume more responsibility for completing his/her school and
homework assignments.

D. The client has taken active steps (e.g., study at routine times, seek outside tutor,
consult with teacher before or after class) to improve his/her academic performance.

E. The client's academic performance has improved to his/her level of capability.

2. Incomplete Homework Assignments (2)

A. The client has consistently failed to complete his/her classroom or homework
assignments in a timely manner.

B. The client has refused to comply with parents' and teachers'requests to complete
classroom or homework assignments.

C. The client expressed a renewed desire to complete his/her classroom and homework
assignments on a regular basis.

D. The client has recently completed his/her classroom and homework assignments on a
consistent basis.

E. The client's regular completion of classroom and homework assignments has resulted
in higher grades.

3. Disorganization (3)

A. Parents and teachers described a history of the client being disorganized in the
classroom.

B. The client has often lost or misplaced books, school papers, or important things
necessary for tasks or activities at school.

C. The client has started to take steps (e.g., use planner or agenda to record
school/homework assignments, consult with teachers before or after school, schedule
routine study times) to become more organized at school.

D. The client's increased organization abilities have contributed to his/her improved
academic performance.

4. Poor Study Skills (3)

A. The parents and teachers reported that the client has historically displayed poor study
skills.

B. The client acknowledged that his/her lowered academic performance is primarily due
to his/her lack of studying.

C. The client has recently spent little time studying.

D. The client reported a recent increase in studying time.

E. The client's increased time spent in studying has been a significant contributing factor
to his/her improved academic performance.

5. Procrastination (4)

A. The client has repeatedly procrastinated or postponed doing his/her classroom or
homework assignments in favor of engaging in social, leisure, or recreational
activities.

B. The client has continued to procrastinate doing his/her classroom or homework
assignments.

C. The client agreed to postpone social, leisure, or recreational activities until he/she has
completed his/her homework assignments.

D. The client has demonstrated greater self-discipline by first completing homework
assignments before engaging in social, leisure, or recreational activities.

E. The client has achieved and maintained a healthy balance between accomplishing
academic goals and meeting his/her social and emotional needs.

6. Family History of Academic Problems (5)

A. The client and parents described a family history of academic problems and failures.

B. The client's parents have demonstrated little interest or involvement in the client's
school-work or activities.

C. The client expressed a desire for his/her parents to show greater interest or
involvement in his/her schoolwork or activities.

D. The parents verbalized a willingness to show greater interest and become more
involved in the client's schoolwork or activities.

E. The parents have sustained an active interest and involvement in the client's
schoolwork and implemented several effective interventions to help the client
achieve his/her academic goals.

7. Depression (6)

A. The client's feelings of depression, as manifested by his/her lack of motivation,
apathy, and listlessness, have contributed to and resulted from his/her low academic
performance.

B. The client appeared visibly depressed when discussing his/her lowered academic
performance.

C. The client expressed feelings of happiness and joy about his/her improved academic
performance.

D. The client's academic performance has increased since his/her depression has lifted.

8. Low Self-Esteem (6)

A. The client's low self-esteem, feelings of insecurity, and lack of confidence have
contributed to and resulted from his/her lowered academic performance.

B. The client displayed a lack of confidence and expressed strong self-doubts about being
able to improve his/her academic performance.

C. The client verbally acknowledged his/her tendency to give up easily and withdraw in
the classroom when feeling insecure and unsure of himself/herself.

D. The client verbalized positive self-descriptive statements about his/her academic
performance.

E. The client has consistently expressed confidence in his/her ability to achieve academic
goals.

9. Disruptive/Attention-Seeking Behavior (7)

A. The client has frequently disrupted the classroom with his/her negative attention-seeking
behavior instead of focusing on his/her schoolwork.

B. The parents have received reports from school teachers that the client has continued to
disrupt the classroom with his/her negative attention-seeking behavior.

C. The client acknowledged that he/she tends to engage in disruptive behavior when
he/she be-gins to feel insecure or become frustrated with his/her schoolwork.

D. The client has started to show greater self-control in the classroom and inhibit the
impulse to act out in order to draw attention to himself/herself.

E. The client has demonstrated a significant decrease in his/her disruptive and negative
attention-seeking behavior.

10. Low Frustration Tolerance (7)

A. The client has developed a low frustration tolerance as manifested by his/her persistent
pattern of giving up easily when encountering difficult or challenging academic
tasks.

B. The client's frustration tolerance with his/her schoolwork has remained very low.

C. The client has started to show improved frustration tolerance and has not given up as
easily or as often on his/her classroom or homework assignments.

D. The client has demonstrated good frustration tolerance and consistently completed
his/her classroom/homework assignments without giving up.

11. Test-Taking Anxiety (8)

A. The client described a history of becoming highly anxious before or during tests.

B. The client's heightened anxiety during tests has interfered with his/her academic
performance.

C. The client shared that his/her test-taking anxiety is related to fear of failure and of
being met with disapproval or criticism by significant others.

D. The client has begun to take steps (e.g., deep breathing, positive self-statements,
challenging irrational thoughts) to reduce his/her anxiety and feel more relaxed
during the taking of tests.

E. The client reported a significant decrease in the level of anxiety while taking tests.

12. Excessive Parental Pressure (9)

A. The client has viewed his/her parents as placing excessive or unrealistic pressure on
him/her to achieve academic success.

B. The parents acknowledged that they have placed excessive or unrealistic pressure on
the client to achieve academic success.

C. The parents denied placing excessive or unrealistic pressure on the client to achieve;
instead they attributed the client's lowered academic performance to his/her lack of
motivation and effort.

D. The client reported that the parents have decreased the amount of pressure that they
have placed on him/her to achieve academic success.

E. The parents have established realistic expectations of the client's level of capabilities.

13. Excessive Criticism (9)

A. The client described the parents as being overly critical of his/her academic
performance.

B. The client expressed feelings of sadness and inadequacy about critical remarks that
his/her parents have made in regard to his/her academic performance.

C. The client acknowledged that he/she deliberately refuses to do school assignments
when he/she perceives the parents as being overly critical.

D. The parents acknowledged that they have been overly critical of the client's academic
performance.

E. The parents have significantly reduced the frequency of their critical remarks about the
client's academic performance.

14. Environmental Stress (10)

A. The client's academic performance has markedly declined since experiencing stressors
within his/her personal and/or family life.

B. The client's academic performance has decreased since his/her family moved and
he/she had to change schools.

C. The client has not been able to invest as much time or energy into his/her schoolwork
because of having to deal with environmental stressors.

D. The client has begun to manage his/her stress more effectively so that he/she has more
time and energy to devote to schoolwork.

E. The client's academic performance has increased since resolving or finding effective
ways to cope with the environmental stressor(s).

15. Loss or Separation (10)

A. The client's academic performance has decreased significantly since experiencing the
separation or loss.

B. The client verbalized feelings of sadness, hurt, and disappointment about past
separation(s) or loss(es).

C. The client has taken active steps (i.e., socialized regularly with peers, studied with
peers, participated in extracurricular activities) to build a positive support network at
school to help him/her cope with the past separation(s) or loss(es).

D. The client's academic interest and performance has increased substantially since
working through his/her grief issues.


INTERVENTIONS IMPLEMENTED

1. Refer for Psychoeducational Testing (1)

A. The client received a psychoeducational evaluation to rule out the presence of a
possible learning disability that may be contributing to his/her academic
underachievement.

B. The client received a psychoeducational evaluation to determine whether he/she is
eligible to receive special education services.

C. As noted, the client was cooperative during the psychoeducational testing and
appeared motivated to do his/her best.

D. The client was uncooperative during the psychoeducational testing and did not appear
to put forth good effort; he/she was urged to provide a better effort.

E. The client's resistance during the psychoeducational testing was interpreted to be due
to his/her feelings of insecurity and opposition to possibly receiving special
education services.

2. Refer for Psychological Testing for ADHD/Emotional Factors (2)

A. The client received a psychological evaluation to help determine whether he/she has
ADHD that may be contributing to his/her low academic performance.

B. The client received psychological testing to help determine whether emotional factors
are contributing to his/her low academic performance.

C. The client was uncooperative and resistant during the evaluation process; he/she was
urged to provide a better effort.

D. It was noted that the client approached the psychological testing in an honest,
straightforward manner and was cooperative with the examiner.

E. Feedback was provided to the client, his/her family, and school officials regarding the
psychological evaluation.

3. Obtain Psychosocial History (3)

A. A psychosocial assessment was completed to gather pertinent information about the
client's past academic performance, developmental milestones, and family history of
educational achievements and failures.

B. The client and parents were positively reinforced for being cooperative in providing
information about the client's early developmental history, school performance, and
family background.

C. A review of the client's background revealed a history of developmental delays and
low academic performance.

D. The psychosocial assessment revealed a family history of academic underachievement
and failures.

E. The psychosocial assessment revealed a history of strong expectations being placed on family
members to achieve academic success.

F. The psychosocial assessment revealed a healthy family history regarding academic
success.

4. Refer for Hearing/Vision/Medical Examination (4)

A. The client was referred for a hearing and vision examination to rule out possible
hearing or visual problems that may be interfering with his/her school performance.

B. The client was referred for a medical evaluation to rule out possible health problems
that may be interfering with his/her school performance.

C. The hearing examination results revealed the presence of hearing problems that are
interfering with the client's academic performance.

D. The vision examination revealed the presence of visual problems that are interfering
with the client's school performance.

E. The medical examination revealed the presence of health problems that are interfering
with the client's school performance.

F. The client and his/her parents have not followed through on a hearing, vision, or
medical examination and were redirected to do so.

5. Attend IEPC Meeting (5)

A. The client's IEPC was held with parents, teachers, and school officials to determine
the client's eligibility for special education services, to design educational
interventions, and to establish educational goals.

B. The recommendation was made at the IEPC that the client receive special education
services to address his/her learning problems.

C. At the IEPC meeting, it was determined that the client is not in need of special
education services because he/she does not meet the criteria for a learning disability.

D. The IEPC meeting was helpful in identifying specific educational goals.

E. The IEPC meeting was helpful in designing several educational interventions for the
client.

6. Move to Appropriate Classroom (6)

A. Based on the IEPC goals and recommendations, the client was moved to an
appropriate classroom setting to maximize his/her learning.

B. Based on the IEPC goals and recommendations, the client has been provided with
additional services, including changing to a more appropriate classroom for some
academic areas.

Continues...




Excerpted from The Adolescent Psychotherapy Progress Notes Planner
by Arthur E. Jongsma, Jr. L. Mark Peterson William P. McInnis David J. Berghuis
Copyright © 2003 by Arthur E. Jongsma, Jr., L. Mark Peterson, William P. McInnis, David J. Berghuis.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

PracticePlanners Series Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xv
Introduction 1
Academic Underachievement 5
Adoption 19
Anger Management 29
Anxiety 42
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) 50
Autism/Pervasive Developmental Disorder 64
Blended Family 75
Chemical Dependence 85
Conduct Disorder/Delinquency 99
Depression 112
Divorce Reaction 127
Eating Disorder 143
Grief/Loss Unresolved 156
Low Self-Esteem 167
Mania/Hypomania 177
Medical Condition 190
Mental Retardation 201
Negative Peer Influences 216
Oppositional Defiant 229
Parenting 238
Peer/Sibling Conflict 249
Physical/Emotional Abuse Victim 259
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) 272
Psychoticism 283
Runaway 293
School Violence 303
Sexual Abuse Perpetrator 315
Sexual Abuse Victim 328
Sexual Acting Out 344
Sexual Identity Confusion 353
Social Phobia/Shyness 362
Specific Phobia 376
Suicidal Ideation/Attempt 384
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