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Adopted By the Eagles
     

Adopted By the Eagles

by Paul Goble, Paul Goble (Illustrator)
 

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Caldecott Medalist Paul Goble tells the story of his mentor Chief Edgar Red Cloud in a meticulously rendered Lakota tale of treachery and betrayal. Glimpses of wildlife intimately convey the scale of the Great Plains inside magnificently graphic and bold paintings that reverberate with meaning in this stunning, dramatic account. Full color.

Overview

Caldecott Medalist Paul Goble tells the story of his mentor Chief Edgar Red Cloud in a meticulously rendered Lakota tale of treachery and betrayal. Glimpses of wildlife intimately convey the scale of the Great Plains inside magnificently graphic and bold paintings that reverberate with meaning in this stunning, dramatic account. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sylvia J. Pantaleo
This dramatic account tells the legend of two young Lakota warriors, White Hawk and Tall Bear, who declare a special friendship and become kolas, or friends. The warriors also become rivals for the love of the same maiden. While hunting horses, White Hawk betrays Tall Bear and abandons his friend on a narrow rocky ledge. The eagles save Tall Bear and when the warrior returns to his village, White Hawk is ashamed of his treacherous deeds and flees. Tall Bear marries the maiden and shows his appreciation to the eagles. Goble's trademark illustration style depicts the characters in historically accurate clothing, outlined in white and set against the landscape of the Great Plains or the vast sky. Goble uses some Lakota language (in boldface type) but these words are explained to the reader. At the beginning of the picture book, Goble provides information about the source of the tale and cautions teachers about requiring students to write their own "Indian" stories. 1998 (orig.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-White Hawk and Tall Bear are great friends, or kolas, sworn to do everything together, including die in one another's defense. The friendship is strained however, when they both fall in love with Red Leaf, and White Hawk betrays his friend, leaving him to starve on a remote ledge of a high butte. Tall Bear survives with the help of a family of eagles who feed and care for him as though he were one of their own. When the eaglets grow in size, they carry Tall Bear safely down to the Earth. He returns to the village, and White Hawk flees in disgrace. Tall Bear marries Red Leaf and together they visit his friends, cementing the relationship between the ``Two-legged People'' and the ``Eagle Nation.'' Goble's retelling of this Plains Indian story is somewhat sanitized when compared to Jenny Leading Cloud's version in The Sound of the Flutes and Other Indian Legends (Pantheon, 1976; o.p.). Nevertheless, this version remains an absorbing tale. The watercolor illustrations, as usual, are excellent. However, two disturbing elements must be pointed out. The author felt compelled to note that the ``traditional kola friendship of two Lakota men, as described in this story, was never a homosexual relationship.'' He follows this totally unnecessary statement with a condescending note to teachers, discouraging them from having students write their own ``Indian'' stories as it ``belittles these traditional stories.'' If you are willing to overlook these remarks, this book will make a nice addition to most collections.-George Delalis, Chicago Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689820861
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
11/01/1998
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.03(w) x 10.42(h) x 0.15(d)
Lexile:
420L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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