The Adoration of Jenna Fox

The Adoration of Jenna Fox

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by Mary E. Pearson, Jenna Lamia
     
 

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Who is Jenna Fox? Seventeen-year-old Jenna has been told that is her name. She has just awoken from a coma, they tell her, and she is still recovering from a terrible accident in which she was involved a year ago. But what happened before that? Jenna doesn’t remember her life. Or does she? And are the memories really hers?

 

Mary E. Pearson's The

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Overview

Who is Jenna Fox? Seventeen-year-old Jenna has been told that is her name. She has just awoken from a coma, they tell her, and she is still recovering from a terrible accident in which she was involved a year ago. But what happened before that? Jenna doesn’t remember her life. Or does she? And are the memories really hers?

 

Mary E. Pearson's The Adoration of Jenna Fox is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Sometime in the near future, Jenna Fox, 17, awakens from an 18-month-long coma following a devastating accident, her memory nearly blank. She attempts reorientation by watching videos of her childhood, "recorded beyond reason" by worshipful parents, but mysteries proliferate. Jenna can recite passages from Thoreau yet can't remember having any friends. As memories return, however, Jenna starts picking at the explanation her parents have spun until it unravels. Pearson (A Room on Lorelei Street ) uses each revelation to steadily build tension until the true horror comes into focus. Even then Pearson does not stop; she raises the ante in unexpected ways until the very last page. Clues are supplied by the supporting cast: Jenna's father, who made his fortune in biotechnology; a classmate whose loss of limbs has turned her into a crusader for medical ethics; Jenna's Catholic grandmother, who is hostile to her. A few lapses in logic- if Jenna's father is world-famous and the family in hiding, why does she enroll in school under her real name?-can be forgiven in favor of expert plotting and the complex questions raised about ethics and the nature of the soul. Ages 14-up. (Apr.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Paula McMillen
Jenna Angeline Fox has ostensibly just awakened from a year-long coma, supposedly the result of a serious accident, and she cannot remember anything about her prior life. Her parents assure her that will change. They are living in a crumbling California house with her maternal grandmother, Lily, who seems inexplicably hostile, although Jenna feels sure that was not always the case. Jenna's memory does begin to come back, but in strange ways. She can remember things that happened when she was much too young to have clear memories (her baptism), and yet she cannot remember if she ever had any friends. Her parents have documented her life in hours of video recordings, and Jenna watches them in an effort to recover her life and herself. What she finds is that her parents adored her, almost to the point of obsession. Can someone love you too much? As a parent, what would you do to save your child? This is a speculative novel set in perhaps a not-too-distant future when biogenetics can preserve and even promulgate life. Science has run amuck, and millions have died or been maimed by antibiotic-resistant germs. The backlash has created government mandates about what some see as life-saving technology. Jenna's narrative as she gradually uncovers the mystery of her history and existence is haunting and compelling. The other characters—family members, neighborhood friends, school friends—are equally complex and believable. Teen readers will be drawn in because the story is well-written, it is well-paced, and it deals with many of the same relationship and existential issues that shape adolescence. But the story also pushes us to think about larger philosophical questions such aswhat is it that makes us truly human? Neal Shusterman's Unwind and Nancy Farmer's The House of the Scorpion examine similarly thorny dilemmas about the value and meaning of an individual life. This book would be a great catalyst for a discussion around science and ethics—about our responsibilities to one another, to the environment and to society at large. Reviewer: Paula McMillen, Ph.D.
VOYA - Hilary Crew
"Then what am I?" asks seventeen-year-old Jenna Fox when she is told the truth. When her body is beyond saving after a car accident, her father's medical team creates a new, "illegal" body infused with "Bio-Gel." Her brain is scanned, improved, and uploaded, but all that physically remains of the original Jenna is "ten per cent" of her brain-the "butterfly." She remembers the accident-for which she was blamed-and discovers the back-ups of her brain and those of her two friends who were killed. Jenna then makes a decision between betraying her parents or being loyal to her friends and between protecting herself or sacrificing her dependence on a machine-should things go wrong. Now living in California, where she will have a longer "shelf-life," Jenna slowly begins to make a new path for herself. Pearson creates an extraordinarily fine novel. There are clear explanations of how the new Jenna is created. The ethics of biotechnological advances are debated and seamlessly woven into a well-developed story. Pearson writes with acuity about the dilemma of parents who adored their daughter and could not let her go and of the complex relationships among Jenna, her parents, and her grandmother. Jenna's innermost emotions and recovered memories, including reliving the "hell" of days in a dark place, unable to express her wish to die, are conveyed in free verse on pages interspersed with her first-person narrative. In this beautifully written novel, Pearson deals with the heart of what it means to be human. Reviewer: Hilary Crew
KLIATT
AGERANGE: Ages 12 to 18.

Seventeen-year-old Jenna Fox wakes from a coma and doesn’t know who she is. She has been involved in a horrific accident and is brought home to recuperate with her mother and her grandmother, two women she does not remember. In fact, she is not really at home; her parents have moved miles away to give her time to fully recover. And, she has the distinct impression that her grandmother is angry with her. When Jenna insists on being able to go back to school, she is sent to a charter school where every student has had some difficulty to overcome--some have emotional scars, like Ethan; others, like Allys, are struggling with physical handicaps. Jenna becomes friends with both, and quadriplegic Allys draws Jenna and Ethan into a political passion for strict medical controls. Gradually Jenna starts to glimpse her past life, the accident, and strange memories that don’t make sense to her until she is able to come face to face with the medical practice that has saved her. The novel is part mystery and part science fiction. Set in the future, it raises issues of biomedical ethics, suspended animation and the enduring human spirit. Jenna narrates, and we experience her confusion as she struggles to make sense of events she only vaguely remembers. Students will be intrigued by the medical treatments that allow her to recover and there is much to debate in terms of how far science should go in medical treatment. Is there a line that should not be crossed? This is fascinating and thought provoking. Reviewer: Janis Flint-Ferguson
March 2008 (Vol. 42, No.2)

School Library Journal

Gr 9 Up

Mary Pearson's novel (Holt, 2008) provides a thought-provoking and intriguing examination of what really makes us human and where to draw the line with fast developing technological and medical advances. Jenna Fox wakes from a coma more than a year after having an "accident." With no memory, she slowly learns to function physically, but she can't seem to connect emotionally. Written in a beautiful symphony of revealed memories, Jenna slowly begins to recognize that a secret is being kept from her and something complex and dangerous is going on. As she realizes that she essentially died in the infamous "accident" and was reborn through her father's controversial discovery. Jenna begins to question biomedical ethics and human nature. Narrator Jenna Lamia excels at evoking the haunting, yet detached way that Jenna begins to connect the events in her life. Combining science fiction, medical mystery, and teen relationships into an excellent package that is satisfying from beginning to end, this is a must-have for all collections.-Jessica Miller, New Britain Public Library, CT

Kirkus Reviews
Outstanding examination of identity, science and ethics. "I used to be someone. / Someone named Jenna Fox. / That's what they tell me," begins the hypnotic first-person narration. She woke from an 18-month coma two weeks ago, but she doesn't know how to smile or who her parents are. She watches recordings of each childhood year but they ring no bells. Why has her family brought her to a hidden cottage in California, distant from home and doctors? Mental flashes reveal a void of paralysis where "darkness and silence go on forever." Was that her coma? Voices call Jenna, hurry! into her ears-are those from the night of the accident, which she can't remember? Jenna recognizes that her gait is awkward and her memory peculiar (spotty about childhood while disturbingly perfect about academics), but asking questions provokes only furtive glances between her parents. Pearson reveals the truth layer by layer, maintaining taut suspense and psychological realism as she probes philosophical notions of personhood. A deeply humane and gripping descendent of Peter Dickinson's classic Eva. (Science fiction. YA)
From the Publisher

“* ...raises the ante in unexpected ways until the very last page.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“* This is a beautiful blend of science fiction, medical thriller, and teen-relationship novel that melds into a seamless whole that will please fans of all three genres.” —School Library Journal, starred review

“* Outstanding examination of identity, science and ethics.” —Kirkus, starred review

“Readers will respond eagerly to this provocative novel.” —Kirkus Reviews, Sci-Fi/Fantasy Special

“…what will hold readers most are the moral issues of betrayal, loyalty, sacrifice, and survival.” —Booklist

“Fascinating and thought provoking.” —Kliatt

“This novel is truly unlike any other I have ever read and is a breath of fresh air in the often predictable world of teen literature.” —ELLEgirl

“This is an amazingly powerful, thought-provoking, just brilliant novel.” —Teen Book Review

“An extraordinarily fine novel.” —Voya

“Gut-punch plot twists.” —The Seattle Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781427204431
Publisher:
Macmillan Audio
Publication date:
04/29/2008
Series:
Jenna Fox Chronicles Series, #1
Edition description:
Unabridged
Product dimensions:
6.48(w) x 5.94(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt

The Adoration of Jenna Fox


By Mary E. Pearson

Henry Holt and Company

Copyright © 2008 Mary E. Pearson
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4299-5205-7



CHAPTER 1

California


I used to be someone.

Someone named Jenna Fox.

That's what they tell me. But I am more than a name. More than they tell me. More than the facts and statistics they fill me with. More than the video clips they make me watch.

More. But I'm not sure what.

"Jenna, come sit over here. You don't want to miss this." The woman I am supposed to call Mother pats the cushion next to her. "Come," she says again.

I do.

"This is an historic moment," she says. She puts her arm around me and squeezes. I lift the corner of my mouth. Then the other: a smile. Because I know I am supposed to. It is what she wants.

"It's a first," she says. "We've never had a woman president of Nigerian descent before."

"A first," I say. I watch the monitor. I watch Mother's face. I've only just learned how to smile. I don't know how to match her other expressions. I should.

"Mom, come sit with us," she calls out toward the kitchen. "It's about to start."

I know she won't come. She doesn't like me. I don't know how I know. Her face is as plain and expressionless to me as everyone else's. It is not her face. It is something else.

"I'm doing a few dishes. I'll watch from the monitor in here," she calls back.

I stand. "I can leave, Lily," I offer.

She comes and stands in the arched doorway. She looks at Mother. They exchange an expression I try to understand. Mother's face drops into her hands. "She's your nana, Jenna. You've always called her Nana."

"That's all right. She can call me Lily," she says and sits down on the other side of Mother.


    Awareness

    There is a dark place.
    A place where I have no eyes, no mouth. No words.
    I can't cry out because I have no breath. The silence is so deep I want to
      die
    But I can't.
    The darkness and silence go on forever.
    It is not a dream.
    I don't dream.


Waking

The accident was over a year ago. I've been awake for two weeks. Over a year has vanished. I've gone from sixteen to seventeen. A second woman has been elected president. A twelfth planet has been named in the solar system. The last wild polar bear has died. Headline news that couldn't stir me. I slept through it all.

I cried on waking. That's what they tell me. I don't remember the first day. Later I heard Lily whisper to Mother in the kitchen that my cries frightened her. "It sounds like an animal," she said.

I still cry on waking. I'm not sure why. I feel nothing. Nothing I can name, anyway. It's like breathing — something that happens over which I have no control. Father was here for my waking. He called it a beginning. He said it was good. I think he may have thought that anything I did was good. The first few days were difficult. My mind and body thrashed out of control. My mind settled first. They kept my arms strapped. By the second day my arms had settled, too. The house seemed busy. They checked me, probed, checked again and again, Father scanning my symptoms into the Netbook several times a day, someone relaying back treatment. But there was no treatment that I could see. Each day I improved. That was it. One day I couldn't walk. The next day I could. One day my right eyelid drooped. The next it didn't. One day my tongue lay like a lump of meat in my mouth, the next day it was articulating words that hadn't been spoken in over a year.

On the fifth day, when I walked out onto the veranda without stumbling, Mother cried and said, "It's a miracle. An absolute miracle."

"Her gait is still not natural. Can't you see that?" Lily said.

Mother didn't answer.

On the eighth day Father had to return to work in Boston. He and Mother whispered, but I still heard. Risky ... have to get back ... you'll be fine. Before he left he cupped my face in both of his hands. "Little by little, Angel," he said. "Be patient. Everything will come back. Over time all the connections will be made." I think my gait is normal now. My memory is not. I don't remember my mother, my father, or Lily. I don't remember that I once lived in Boston. I don't remember the accident. I don't remember Jenna Fox.

Father says it will come in time. "Time heals," he says.

I don't tell him that I don't know what time is.


    Time

    There are words.
    Words I don't remember.
    Not obscure words that I wouldn't be expected to know.
    But simple ones.
    Jump. Hot. Apple.
    Time.

    I look them up. I will never forget them again.
    Where did those words go,
    those words that were once in my head?


Order

Curious adj. 1. Eager to learn or to know, inquisitive. 2. Prying or meddlesome. 3. Inexplicable, highly unusual, odd, strange.


The first week Mother pored over the details of my life. My name. Childhood pets. Favorite books. Family vacations. And after each scene she described, she would ask, "Remember?" Each time I said no, I saw her eyes change. They seemed to get smaller. Is that possible? I tried to say the nos more softly. I tried to make each one sound different than the one before. But on Day Six her voice cracked as she told me about my last ballet recital. Remember?

On Day Seven, Mother handed me a small box. "I don't want to pressure you," she said. "They're in order. Mostly all labeled. Maybe watching them will help bring things back." She hugged me. I felt her fuzzy sweater. I felt the coolness of her cheek. Things I can feel. Hard. Soft. Rough. Smooth. But the inside kind of feel, it is all the same, like foggy mush. Is that the part of me that is still asleep? I had moved my arms around her and tried to mimic her squeeze. She seemed pleased. "I love you, Jenna," she said. "Anything you want to ask me, I'm here. I want you to know that."

"Thank you" was the right response, so I said it. I don't know if that was something I remembered or something I had just learned. I don't love her. I sensed that I should, but how can you love someone you don't know? But I did feel something in that foggy mush. Devotion? Obligation? I wanted her to be pleased. I thought about her offer, anything you want to ask me. I had nothing to ask. The questions hadn't come yet.

So I watched the first disc. It seemed logical to go in order. It was of me in utero. Hours of me in utero. I was the first, I learned. There had been two boy babies before me, but they didn't live past the first trimester. With me, Mother and Father took extra measures, and they worked. I was the one and only. Their miracle child. I watched the fetus that was me, floating in a dark watery world, and wondered if I should remember that, too.

Each day I watch more discs, trying to regain who I was. Some are stills, some are movies. There are dozens of the two-inch discs. Maybe a hundred. Thousands of hours of me.

I settle on the large sofa. Today I watch Year Three / Jenna Fox. It begins with my third birthday party. A small girl runs, laughing at nothing at all, and is finally stopped by a tall, weathered stone wall. She slaps tiny starburst hands against the stone and looks back at the camera. I pause the scene. I scan the smile. The face. She has something. Something I don't see in my own face, but I don't know what it is. Maybe just a word I have lost? Maybe more. I scan the large rough stones her hands rest against. It is the small enclosed garden of the brownstone where we once lived. I remember it from yesterday on Disc Eighteen.

"Play," I say, and the scene moves forward. I watch the golden-haired girl squeal and run and hide her face between two trousered legs. Then the three-year-old is scooped upside down into the air and the view zooms up to Father's face laughing and nuzzling into her belly. My belly. The three-year-old laughs. She seems to like it. I walk over to the mirror that hangs near the bookcase. I am seventeen now, but I see resemblance. Same blond hair. Same blue eyes. But the teeth are different. Three-year-old teeth are so small. My fingers. My hands. All much larger now. Almost a whole different person. And yet that is me. At least that is what they say. I return to watch the rest of the party, the bath time, the ballet lesson, the finger painting, the temper tantrum, the story time, the everything of three-year-old Jenna Fox's life that mattered to Mother and Father.

I hear footsteps behind me. I don't turn. They are Lily's. Her feet make a different sound on the floor than Mother's. Movement is crisp, distinct. I hear every nuance. Was I always this sensitive to sound? She stands somewhere behind me. I wait for her to speak. She doesn't. I'm not sure what she wants.

"You don't have to watch them in order, you know," she finally says.

"I know. Mother told me."

"There are discs of when you were a teenager."

"I still am a teenager."

There is a pause. A deliberate pause, I suspect. "I suppose," she says. She comes around so she is in my vision. "Aren't you curious?"

Curious. It's a word I looked up this morning after Mother used it to describe Mr. Bender who lives behind us on the other side of the pond. I don't know if Lily is asking me if I am inquisitive or odd.

"I've been in a coma for over a year. I guess that makes me highly unusual; odd; and strange. Yes, Lily. I am curious."

Lily's arms unfold and slide to her sides. Her head tilts slightly. She's a pretty woman. She looks to be fifty when I know she must be at least sixty. Small wrinkles deepen around her eyes. The subtleties of expression still escape me.

"You should watch them out of order. Skip straight to the last year."

Lily leaves the room, and on Day Fifteen of being awake, I make my first independent decision. I will watch the discs in order.


Widening

There is something curious about where we live. Something curious about Lily. Something curious about Father and his nightly phone calls with Mother. And certainly something curious about me. Why can I remember the details of the French Revolution but I can't remember if I ever had a best friend?

Day Sixteen

When I woke this morning, I had questions. I wondered where they had all been hiding. Time heals. Is this what Father meant? Or were the words that had been lost in my head simply trying to find the proper order? Besides questions, the word careful came to mind, too. Why? I'm beginning to think I must trust words when they come to me.

"Jenna, I'm leaving," Mother calls from the front step. "Are you sure you'll be okay?"

Mother is going to town. It is the first time I have seen her leave the house since Day One.

"I'll be fine," I tell her. "My nutrients are on the counter. I know how much to take." I can't eat regular food yet. When I asked them why, they stumbled over each other's words trying to explain. They finally said that after a year of being fed through a tube, my system can't utilize regular food for a while. I never saw the tube. Maybe that's what's on the last disc that Lily told me to watch. Why would she want me to see that?

"Don't leave the house," Mother adds.

"She won't," Lily answers.

Mother is going to town to interview workmen. She is a certified restoration consultant. Or was. She had a business in Boston restoring brownstones. It was her specialization. She was busy. Everyone wants to restore everything. Old is in demand. Lily says she had a respected reputation. Her career is over now because of me. There are no brownstones in California. But Mother says the Cotswold cottage we live in needs lots of restoration, and now that I am feeling better, it's time she began making it livable. One restoration is not that different from another, she says. Fixing me and the Cotswold are her new careers.

She is halfway down the narrow front walk when I ask her my first question. I know it's not a good time for her.

"Mother, why did we move here?"

She stops. I think I see a slight stumble. She turns around. Her eyes are wide. She doesn't speak, so I continue. "When the doctors, Father, and your career are all in Boston, why are we here?"

Mother looks down for a moment so I can't see her face, then looks up again. She smiles. One corner. Then the other. A careful smile. "There's lots of reasons, Jenna. I can't discuss them all right now or I'll miss the shuttle into town, but the main reason is we thought it would be best for you to have a quiet place to recover. And our plan seems to be working, doesn't it?"

Smooth. Practiced. I can hear it in the singsong of her voice. In some ways it's almost reasonable, but I can see the holes. Having a quiet place is not as important as being close to doctors. But I nod. There is something about her eyes. Eyes don't breathe. I know that much. But hers look breathless.


My Room

I go to my room. I don't want to. But before she left, Mother made one last request. "Go to your room, Jenna. I think you might need some rest." I don't need rest, and I don't want to go, but before I know it, my feet are taking me up the stairs and I am closing my door behind me. I know it would please her.

My room is on the second floor — one of ten rooms on the upper level, along with an assortment of closets, bathrooms, nooks, and other small windowless rooms that seem to have no purpose. Mine is the only one that is clean and has furniture. The others are empty except for an occasional spider or a piece of trash left by the previous occupants. The lower floor has at least another ten rooms, and only half of those rooms are furnished. A few of the rooms are locked. I have not seen them. Mother and Lily have rooms down there. The cottage is not a cottage at all. I looked it up to be sure. I looked up Cotswold, too. It's a sheep. So we should live in a one-room house meant for sheep. I haven't seen any sheep here either.

My room is at the end of a long hallway. It is the largest room on the upper level, which makes the lone bed, desk, and chair seem small and awkward. The polished wood floor reflects the pieces of furniture. It is a cold room. Not in temperature, but in temperament. It reflects nothing of the person who inhabits it. Or maybe it does.

The only color in the room is the custard yellow coverlet on the bed. The desktop is clear except for the Netbook that Father used to communicate with the doctors. No papers. No books. No clutter. Nothing.

The bedroom opens into a large arched dressing room that connects with a closet that connects with another smaller closet that has a small door at the back, which I can't open. It is an odd zigzag tunneling arrangement. Was my room in Boston like this? Four shirts and four pairs of pants hang in the first closet. All of them are blue. Below them are two pairs of shoes. Nothing is in the second closet. I run my hands along the walls and wonder at the emptiness.

I look out my window. Across our yard and the pond, I see curious Mr. Bender, a mere speck in the distance. He appears to be squatting, looking at something on the ground. He moves a few steps forward and disappears from view, hidden by the edge of a eucalyptus grove that borders both our properties. I turn back to my room.

A wooden chair.

A bare desk.

A plain bed.

So little. Is this all Jenna Fox adds up to?


    A Question I Will Never Ask Mother:

    Did I have friends?
    I was sick for over a year and yet there is not a single card,
    letter, balloon, or wilted bouquet of flowers in my room.
    The Netbook never buzzes for me.
    Not even an old classmate's simple inquiry.
    I may not remember everything, but I know there should be
    these things.
    Something.
    I know when someone is sick that people check on her.
    What kind of person was Jenna Fox that she didn't have any friends?
    Was she someone I even want to remember?
    Everyone should have at least one friend.


More

I hear Lily humming. My feet fumble like they have a will of their own, but I try to control them so she won't hear me. I lean close to the wall and peek into the kitchen. Her back is to me. She spends most of her time in the kitchen preparing elaborate dishes. She used to be chief of internal medicine at Boston University Hospital. Father was a resident under her. That is how he met Mother. Lily gave it up. I don't know why. Now her passion is gardening and cooking. It seems that everyone in this house is reinventing themselves and no one is who they once were.

When she is not in the kitchen cooking, she is out in the greenhouse getting it in order. I can't eat her foods, and I wonder if that is part of the reason she doesn't like me. She clanks pots and then turns on the faucet. I make my move for the front door.

The hinges on the heavy wooden door squeak when I exit, but she doesn't follow. The sound blends with the clanking pots and rushing water. I have been no farther than the front steps of the house, except for once when it was dark and Mother took me for a short walk to Lily's greenhouse. Mother told me from the start that I must stay close. She is afraid I will get lost.

Lost adj. 1. No longer known. 2. Unable to find the way. 3. Ruined or destroyed.

I'm afraid I already am.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary E. Pearson. Copyright © 2008 Mary E. Pearson. Excerpted by permission of Henry Holt and Company.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Meet the Author

Mary E. Pearson is the author of three other novels for teens—A Room on Lorelei Street, David v. God, and Scribbler of Dreams.  She writes full-time from her home in Carlsbad, California, where she lives with her husband and two dogs. 

 

 

Jenna Lamia's acting credits include appearances on Oz, Law & Order: SVU, and the films The Fighter, The Box, and Something's Wrong in Kansas, among others. In addition to her YALSA Amazing Audiobooks for Young Adults award-winning of reading The Adoration of Jenna Fox, Jenna has narrated Carol Lynch Williams's The Chosen One, for which she received the 2010 solo narration (female) Audie Award.  She attended Amherst College, New York University, and the Sorbonne in Paris.

Jenna Lamia is the acclaimed narrator of Mary E. Pearson's The Adoration of Jenna Fox, which won a YALSA Amazing Audiobooks for Young Adults award, and Carol Lynch Williams's The Chosen One, for which Jenna received the 2010 solo narration (female) Audie Award. 

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The Adoration of Jenna Fox 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 251 reviews.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
What makes us human? How far would you go to save your child? What is ethically and morally right and wrong? These are heavy questions that the author will make the reader ponder long after the last page has been turned.

Jenna Fox has just woken up from over a year-long coma. She doesn't remember anything, but has fragments of memory that she is slowly trying to piece together. There are people there that say they are her parents, and another woman that is her grandmother. Left with the video disks of her life, she starts to watch and ponder "Who is Jenna Fox?"

There has been an accident, but no one will talk to her about the details. As she slowly heals, Jenna questions everything and starts to fill in gaps. After a little while of recovery, she pushes to go to school and begins to attend a local charter school. There she meets an odd assortment of classmates.

Alice has medical issues of her own, and starts to explain the federal ethics board to Jenna. Each person is allotted 100 lifetime points to be used for medical reasons. Alice has prosthetic limbs and explains that limb replacement is relatively low on the point scale. Other procedures would be worth much more. Dane is a neighbor but something seems off with him. When Jenna looks in his eyes, he seems empty. And then there is Ethan. He's hiding a dark secret of his own.

As Jenna discovers the world around her, the secrets and mysteries that are her life slowly start to be revealed. Remembering what Alice has explained about the lifetime points, Jenna comes to realize that there are even deeper secrets about her that she must uncover. Her parents have moved her from Boston to California. Is it to protect her from those that were involved with the accident? Or does it have more far-reaching medical and ethical implications?

Without wanting to give away the plot twists and hidden mysteries of the story, I will tell you that the issues Ms. Pearson raises will cause you to ponder how far science should be allowed to explore. As Jenna tries to discover, the reader will also be forced to wonder how much of us do we need to keep us truly human? Ms. Pearson makes the reader question if it's truly the flesh and blood that makes us human, or if there is something further inside that gives us our identity. Comparing the
lack of emotion that Dane has with Jenna's unwavering questioning of everything, it shows the reader that things are not always black and white. The majority of us live in the gray area that is between the two extremes.

Read THE ADORATION OF JENNA FOX to find out what it means to sacrifice everything for love and how to really be human.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Adoration of Jenna Fox By: Mary E. Pearson Waking up after 18-month-long coma, 17-year-old Jenna Fox has no recollection of anything, not even her name. She feels no love for her mother and father; after all, she doesn't even remember them. Why should she love strangers? She is reminded of her past through her parents' verbal stories and home movies they provide her. Jenna doesn't feel comfortable in her body, which doesn't seem to work just right. Her hands don't intertwine together smoothly, and her classmates point out her awkward gait. Jenna wants to fit in again. She aspires to be the Jenna her parents knew and cherished. It is difficult, though, when all she can remember is bits and pieces of her life before the accident that sent her into a never-ending coma, most of which are insignificant. She wonders why she can't eat normal food, and why her grandmother no longer loves her. She wonders why she lives in California when her dad and her old house are still in Boston. She makes desperate cries in the middle of the night to anyone who will listen, "Tell me who I am" (29). With so much to take in so quickly, Jenna feels overloaded with information in an attempt to find out the answer to the most important question: Who is Jenna Fox? Taking place in the future, this science fiction novel explores the implications of today's medicine in the eventual future. In addition, innovative technologies advance medicine to new heights, some of which may cross the line. In my opinion, Mary E. Pearson did an excellent job crafting The Adoration of Jenna Fox. The chapters allow for the reader to easily follow the story, and each chapter smoothly transitions into the next. The storyline itself is one of a kind and keeps you gripped from beginning to end. The book contained no boring sections because every paragraph, every line, and every sentence was a piece of the puzzle I, as the reader, needed to figure out exactly who Jenna Fox is. While reading this book, expect to be surprised. You are taken along the journey with Jenna, and only find out what she finds out. This format provides for a captivating, page flipping book that grips you to the end. Whether you enjoy mystery/science fiction or simply enjoy reading, Mary E. Pearson's The Adoration of Jenna Fox is a sure winner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Adoration of Jenna Fox and it's sequel are two very detailed and mind-blowing books. Everyone should read these books, because they have a special way of capturing the reader's attention. These books change the way you think! (in a good way)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Adoration of Jenna Fox By: Mary E. Pearson There was an accident, an accident that had changed everything for Jenna Fox. In Mary E. Pearson's The Adoration of Jenna Fox, Jenna Fox grew up like any other only child. Her parents adored her and would do anything for her. Maybe even something illegal. In this book you get to be inside Jenna's head as she is learning to cope with the new life she has been given after her accident and how she deals with all this new information. You get to be right there with her and hear everything she hears and see everything she sees and think the way she thinks. After Jenna's accident her parents felt it was necessary to move Jenna from their home and life in Boston to somewhere in southern California. Jenna's mother Claire and her grandmother Lily dropped everything and moved without really telling anyone were they were going and why they were moving. The grandmother, Lily, in this book is very interesting but fascinating. She starts out not liking the "new" Jenna and ignoring her and not wanting to have anything to do with Jenna. But as Jenna starts to become more and more Jenna again, Lily opens up and is the one that is really there for Jenna. And Lily doesn't hold or hide anything from Jenna like others do. She tells Jenna everything like it is. I enjoyed The Adoration of Jenna Fox a lot. I love being inside Jenna's head; a thing that Jenna always thought about was why she has memories of things that don't seem very important memories. She would always try and piece them together. She once said "A bit for someone here. A bit there. And sometimes they don't add up to anything whole. " (231). As Jenna moves on from her accident, she learns more and more about what is important in life and what can just be left behind. I would really encourage anyone to read this book if you are looking for an easier book that makes you think ahead to what is going to happen next and try and figure out what else her parents are trying to hide from her, Jenna Fox.
Haley Pfeilsticker More than 1 year ago
I found myself strangely enthralled with this little story: the characters, the mystery of it all, the real feeling that seeps from every word. I really enjoyed it and highly recommend it.
LadyHester More than 1 year ago
Although, this is not the most in depth story it is worth reading. The idea behind the plot is extremely thought provoking. What lengths would you go to as a parent to save your child? Technology is changing the world.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
How far would you go to save your child? What makes you,you? These are the things Jenna Fox has to learn...again. She wasn't supposed to survive the accident... but she did. Jenna's life turns upside-down when she wakes up from a year long coma in the so-called state of California that her parents moved her to from Boston during the coma so she can stay away from tne people that were involved. Jenna's dad isn't helping very much to here when he goes on a business trip back to Boston while Jenna is recovering with her mother, and Lily, which supposovly is her grandmother. But Jenna knows Lily, wait Grandma, doesnt like her. But mom says she is still in shock and has to recover herself, but Jenna isn't sure. When Jenna goes back to school she meets others with problems of their own. Jenna realizes that she is human, and what makes you human is whats inside of you and nothing can change that. You must read this book, it is very heart-warming story about Jenna's road to recovery. I loved it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was thoroughly impressed with this book. As soon as I started reading it I could not put it down. This story captures the reader and brings them along on this uncertain journey with Jenna Fox. This book is captivating and something like I have never read before. Mary E. Pearson does an excellent job of explaining, in detail, every thought or feeling of the "new" Jenna Fox. As the story begins Jenna does not know who she is and can not remember anything from before the accident. As the story goes we are caught up with characters and rooting for Jenna to find out the truth of her mysterious new life. The reader will not want this book to end because of the relationship developed with Jenna. As a first time reader of Pearson, I can honestly say she has caught my attention with this thrilling and mysterious novel.
Annibebe More than 1 year ago
Just know this.. After finishing this book, I went out and bought two more by the same author. Interesting and intriguing read.
spanish-lullaby More than 1 year ago
this book is pure genius. it keeps the reader guessing as long as jenna does. it's like the reader is on the journey with her. plus this novel brings up great philosophical questions like how far will you go to save someone? for those who like science fiction or even reluctant readers of sci-fi will enjoy this book.
Jamie Swenson More than 1 year ago
Best book ever!!
SoaringLove More than 1 year ago
The Adoration of Jenna Fox is a stunning futuristic story about a girl who went, mysteriously, into a coma for one whole year. Now, Mother (at least that what Jenna calls the women) makes her watch their home videos of what the old Jenna Fox was like... But, as Jenna learns more and more, The old Jenna Fox isn't someone she wants to be. As she makes new friends (and enemies) Jenna ventures out into the unknown. She has questions, too. Who was she? What were her likes? Dislikes? Why can't she taste? And why is there a blue goo underneath her skin?? Pearson is a smart, funny, and lovable writer... I will never forget this book! The Adoration of Jenna Fox is Gorgeously Stunning!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very scientific, great storyline.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Her parents are hiding things. That is what make sthis sstory go round, trust. This book is soo worth reading. I usually dont like Science Fiction, but this book and the Giver by Lois Lowry are my exceptions. I was forced to read for school, now I am forever grateful I was forced.
TheBookshelfRev More than 1 year ago
Profound and thought provoking, this book had me captivated from the start. It is such a different theme then what I am used to reading. It is about a girl that wakes up from a coma and doesn't know who she is and there is some funky things going on that she has to try and figure them out. I decided to read it because I won the sequel to this book, The Fox Inheritance, in a giveaway. I don't know if I would have picked it pu if I hadn't won the sequel. I am glad I did. I was pleasently surprised at how good it was. The characters really draw you in. The were well thought out and there was enough detail put into them that you could relate to what they all were going through. Jenna and Allys(I still really don't know how to pronounce this name if anyone who read this book knows how to pronounce it please let me know in the comments) are my favorite characters. They really spoke to me in a deep way. I can kind of relate to what they both had to go through. The one thing that I didn't really like was that this book was somewhat predictable. I could guess what was going to happen before it happened. Overall this book was amazing and I would suggest it to anyone to read. The ending was really perfect and I really like how it ended. I already started the sequel and can't wait to tell you guys my thoughts on that one as well. It is really good so far.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Our teacher read this book to us, and I couldn't wait for her to finish it. Their is a sequal to this book that I am currently reading, called The Fox Inheritance. If you want to know what happens to all of them after 200 years, you need to read the sequal. They are both really good books!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I needed to read this story over the summer for school, and I really enjoyed the fast paced book. I believe this story is appropriate for ages ten to thirteen. It changed my whole outlook on what technology is doing, and I really think you should read it. My only issue is, the sentences are too short...like instead of saying "She went shopping for shoes at the mall" the author would say,"She went shopping. She needed shoes." I don't know that just annoyed me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well -written and a quick read
milcaly rodriguez More than 1 year ago
this book is really good, i enjoyed reading it. the main characters is so conflicting with her surroundings. she discovers screts and lies and desperation form her family. as she tries to remember her past she is trying to build a new life as the "new jenna". but her parents want her to be the same jenna as she was before...i dont want to go to any further details but its a good book. the ending couldve been better but if u enjoys suspense and romance and tragety..buy it :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book reeled me in. It was absolutely fascinating but also horrific! When jenna discovered what really happened I was ready to cry! When jenna was angry, I was angry. At the end of the day, you have to come to the conclusion that this book is marvelous!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. I had to read this for school and I couldn't stop reading. I finished the book a little more than a week before my class. The one problem my clas and I have is that the ending was terrible. I recomend anyone to read this, but don't have high hopes for the ending.
GLW13 More than 1 year ago
This book was good, but not the best. I felt that the book didn't get to the point when it was the right timing, and it was pretty slow throughout parts of the book. At times, there was a part that I just couldn't put the book done! I would recommend this book to people who in join weird, and science based books. Also, I would recommend this book to people who are interested in future plans. I recommend that as a reader you should read this book or something close to science fiction to get a broader view of genres whe reading.
Kristin Hromowyk More than 1 year ago
This was a superb book. At times it could get a little boring but when you get to the good parts you wont want to put it down. It is a very interesting concept. Apparently takes place sometime in the future, a bit science-y, but not overly so. Characters pretty well developed. Many twists that are appreciated. I recommend this book.
Galleysmith More than 1 year ago
The plot behind this book is quite innovative, however, I'm not really able to speak to it as much as I'd like for fear of spoiling some of the outstanding revelations the reader is party too as the story unfolds. What worked for me - Pearson wrote Jenna's struggle for identity so profoundly. The hurdles of secrecy from those around her, seeking and navigating new friendships, the desperation to remember who she was all shaped how Jenna constructed who she was presently. I enjoyed the ethical dillema's Jenna's circumstance created. These dilema's affected every relationship she had as well as the nation as a whole. It was definitely an interesting aspect of the story that surrounded morality and values. Further it was thought provoking enough to lead the reader to question their own thoughts on the issues presented. I do feel like this would make an excellent book club read as there is a wealth to discuss. What didn't work for me - the end. I felt like the epilogue rushed to tie everything up with a nice pretty bow. We'd spent all this time in the messy aftermath of Jenna's accident and then we travel however many years after major revelations are made and we have epic scale closure. Personally I would have liked to have either seen a small progression in time from said revelations or, even better, read the story between when they were made and where Jenna landed in the epilogue. The tone. The tone of this story was quite docile and monotone to me. I think given the circumstances of Jenna's accident and the secrets being kept this choice made by Pearson was a conscious one. But because it was so flat I didn't feel the emotion as much as I would have liked. Further I think some of the urgency was lost when we learn some of the higher level secrets being kept from Jenna. Ultimately, Adoration of Jenna Fox was a good read that certainly makes a person think. It's one of those YA books that I feel could appeal to those who are not sold on the genre. It would make an excellent first foray for adults curious to experience young adult literature.
ReBeKAh_REaD_aLOT More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. i really like it. it makes you think about how hard it is for Jenna Fox in how she must discover herself. she doesn't know what to do with herself. I wanted to just skip to the end to find out what happened. It has a slow start to the book but once you get a few chapters into the book you just are amazed and also frightened about what happened to her. That's all I am going to say about the book before I spill the beans.LOL. I liked this book a lot!!