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Advanced Java Game Programming / Edition 1
     

Advanced Java Game Programming / Edition 1

4.7 3
by David Wallace Croft
 

ISBN-10: 1590591232

ISBN-13: 9781590591239

Pub. Date: 03/29/2004

Publisher: Apress

Advanced Java Game Programming teaches you how to create desktop and Internet computer games using the latest Java programming language techniques. Whereas other Java game programming books focus on introductory Java material, this book covers game programming for experienced Java developers.

David Wallace Croft, founder of the Game

Overview

Advanced Java Game Programming teaches you how to create desktop and Internet computer games using the latest Java programming language techniques. Whereas other Java game programming books focus on introductory Java material, this book covers game programming for experienced Java developers.

David Wallace Croft, founder of the Game Developers Java Users Group (GameJUG), has assembled an open-source reusable game library—a Swing animation engine that allows developers to use these techniques and put out new games very rapidly.

The open-source game library also includes a reusable game deployment framework and a multiplayer networking library with HTTP firewall tunneling capability for applets. All of the code is open source, including the example games. The animation has been scrupulously tested and optimized in the Swing environment, and Croft clearly explains how the code works in great detail. The graphics and audio libraries used in the examples are public domain and may also be used royalty-free for creating new games.

Table of Contents

  1. Development Setup
  2. Deployment Frameworks
  3. Swing Animation
  4. Animation Library
  5. Advanced Graphics
  6. Persistent Data
  7. Game Architecture
  8. A* Algorithm
  9. HTTP Tunneling
  10. HTTP Polling
  11. HTTP Pulling

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590591239
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
03/29/2004
Edition description:
2004
Pages:
584
Product dimensions:
7.01(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.36(d)

Table of Contents

  1. Development Setup
  2. Deployment Frameworks
  3. Swing Animation
  4. Animation Library
  5. Advanced Graphics
  6. Persistent Data
  7. Game Architecture
  8. A* Algorithm
  9. HTTP Tunneling
  10. HTTP Polling
  11. HTTP Pulling


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Advanced Java Game Programming 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
To date, there has been little commercial game development under Java. I won't say none. But if you know anyone in a company writing games, the chances are high that it is in C++. The main problem is that the most lucrative games tend to be twitch games like Doom or Quake. For these, you need the utmost in CPU performance and screen rendering. Java fails on both counts. Its bytecode nature has a performance penalty on a typical Intel or AMD CPU. Plus its graphic libraries, while adequate, did not easily let the programmer have direct access to the graphics memory. But all is not lost. Croft's book will appeal to those who still wish to write Java games, despite the above caveats. For one thing, strategy or turn based games do not necessarily need the highest performance. Java is quite viable here. Plus, as he strongly points out, having a game written in pure Java, without even any JNI hooks, increases vastly the places where is can be played. Because it is far easier to install. Fewer (none!) extra libraries to drag along. And of course, there is the operating system independence. Another point in the favour of Java games is that there can be far less danger of security risks, compared to anything written in C or C++. By running a Java game inside a JVM, you gain this safety. Not absolute, surely, but still reassuring. Also, Croft devotes considerable space to the treatment of advanced graphics. He discards AWT, and sticks to Swing. This will be familiar to many current programmers who are not writing games. He describes how to use hardware accelerated images to improve the effective frame rate. And many other graphics techniques. Overall, very encouraging for games in Java. You might want to try it out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago