Advanced .NET Remoting

Advanced .NET Remoting

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by Mario Szpuszta, Ingo Rammer
     
 
This is first book that focuses exclusively on .NET Remoting. Remoting is a complimentary technology to Web Services that allows far greater extensibility and integration. It leverages the capabilities of the .NET Platform in distributed application scenarios in which both client and server run in this environment. Contrary to WebServices, Remoting is based on

Overview

This is first book that focuses exclusively on .NET Remoting. Remoting is a complimentary technology to Web Services that allows far greater extensibility and integration. It leverages the capabilities of the .NET Platform in distributed application scenarios in which both client and server run in this environment. Contrary to WebServices, Remoting is based on plugable transfer protocols, including either a platform independent SOAP encoding or a higher speed binary protocol which both can be used either over HTTP or direct TCP connections. The Framework provides services for synchronous or asynchronous execution of remote methods, distributed object lifetime management and services for authentication and encryption via HTTPs.
"Advanced .NET Remoting" is the first book that really offers in-depth coverage of the .NET Remoting Framework. The first part of the book covers everything a developer needs to know to use to the Framework and its capabilities in real world applications, including the basics of Server Activated Objects vs. Client Activated Objects, formatters, channels, lifetime issues, security, configuration files, etc. The server side hosting of remoteable components in console applications, Windows Services, and IIS (Internet Information Services) are also covered in detail.
The second part presents .NET Remoting internals in an unprecedented way. Ingo Rammer shows how the Framework really uses message sinks and sink providers, and gives in-depth advise on why and how to implement message and channel sinks. These chapters will also give detailed insight in the synchronous and asynchronous message processing within the Framework.
Rammer also includes a chapter which presents the development process and source code for several "real world" message sinks and finally covers ContextBoundObject, which allows to use the techniques of the .NET Remoting Framework with local, client-only applications.
"Advanced .NET Remoting" will be tech reviewed by a member of Microsoft's Remoting team to ensure the highest quality of technical information.
Ingo Rammer is co-founder and CEO of Sycom Software, an Austrian software consulting company. He works as consultant, trainer and software architect for companies in the software and telecommunication business. During his professional career he has worked with a range of programming platforms but stayed focused mainly to Visual Basic and Java. Most recently, he has designed and implemented several large-scale distributed applications and XML-based distributed application frameworks.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590594179
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
02/15/2005
Edition description:
2nd Corrected ed. 2005. Corr. 3rd printing 2005
Pages:
608
Product dimensions:
7.01(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.05(d)

Meet the Author

Mario Szpuszta is working in the Developer and Platform Group of Microsoft, Austria. Before he started working for Microsoft, Mario was involved in several projects based on COM+ and DCOM with Visual Basic and Visual C++ as well as projects based on Java and J2SE. With beta 2 of the .NET Framework, he started developing Web applications with ASP.NET. As developer evangelist for Microsoft Austria, he is doing workshops, trainings, and proof-of-concept projects together with independent software vendors in Austria based on .NET, Web Services, and Office 2003 technologies.

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Advanced .NET Remoting 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Writing a distributed application is probably one of the hardest things to do well in programming. The authors describe the travails of other, mostly earlier attempts. DCE/RPC, CORBA, DCOM, COM+, Java RMI, EJB and Web Services/SOAP. Each had some disadvantages. Though Web Services appear the most promising. However, if you are coding such that all the machines will run .NET, then the authors suggest .NET Remoting. This is the key factor in whether you choose this over the vendor independent Web Services. As you'd expect, the book gives a thorough explanation of Remoting. In which perhaps the best chapter is that on Tips and Best Practices. It cuts to the core of what you can best do with Remoting in its current incarnation. In this chapter, you get good, frank talk about limitations with Remoting. Most notably, not to use events or callbacks when you have a server and many clients. This makes sense, as they explain, but will go against the grain of many accustomed to GUI application development.