Advanced .NET Remoting

Advanced .NET Remoting

4.0 1
by Mario Szpuszta, Ingo Rammer
     
 

Surpassing any white papers, specialist documents and other documentationthis book features in-depth coverage of the .NET Remoting Framework. The text is organized into three main parts, and this revised, second edition features 150 pages of entirely new material!

Part one includes a guide to the 1.1 framework and its capabilities in real-world applications.

Overview

Surpassing any white papers, specialist documents and other documentationthis book features in-depth coverage of the .NET Remoting Framework. The text is organized into three main parts, and this revised, second edition features 150 pages of entirely new material!

Part one includes a guide to the 1.1 framework and its capabilities in real-world applications. Part two presents .NET remoting internals, and provides real-world code and development strategies. Finally, part three looks at futuristic remoting tools and their present implementation in Visual Studio .NET 2005. You will come to see how remoting procedures will change within the new IDE and revised framework.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590594179
Publisher:
Apress
Publication date:
02/15/2005
Edition description:
2nd Corrected ed. 2005. Corr. 3rd printing 2005
Pages:
608
Product dimensions:
7.01(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.05(d)

Meet the Author

Mario Szpuszta is working in the Developer and Platform Group of Microsoft, Austria. Before he started working for Microsoft, Mario was involved in several projects based on COM+ and DCOM with Visual Basic and Visual C++ as well as projects based on Java and J2SE. With beta 2 of the .NET Framework, he started developing Web applications with ASP.NET. As developer evangelist for Microsoft Austria, he is doing workshops, trainings, and proof-of-concept projects together with independent software vendors in Austria based on .NET, Web Services, and Office 2003 technologies.

Ingo Rammer is co-founder of thinktecture, a company providing in-depth technical consulting and training services for software architects and developers. Ingo is a world-renowned expert for design and development of distributed applications, and he provides architecture, design, and architecture review services for teams of all sizes. He focuses mainly on improving performance, scalability and reliability of critical .NET applications.

Apart from his consulting services, he is a regular speaker at developer conferences around the world, has authored the award-winning best-selling Advanced .NET Remoting books for Apress, and writes a regular column on software design and architecture which is published in English, German and Italian. Ingo is the Microsoft Regional Director for Austria, and was awarded the Microsoft "Most Valuable Professional" status of Solution Architect. You can read more about him at www.thinktecture.com/staff/ingo.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Advanced .NET Remoting 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Writing a distributed application is probably one of the hardest things to do well in programming. The authors describe the travails of other, mostly earlier attempts. DCE/RPC, CORBA, DCOM, COM+, Java RMI, EJB and Web Services/SOAP. Each had some disadvantages. Though Web Services appear the most promising. However, if you are coding such that all the machines will run .NET, then the authors suggest .NET Remoting. This is the key factor in whether you choose this over the vendor independent Web Services. As you'd expect, the book gives a thorough explanation of Remoting. In which perhaps the best chapter is that on Tips and Best Practices. It cuts to the core of what you can best do with Remoting in its current incarnation. In this chapter, you get good, frank talk about limitations with Remoting. Most notably, not to use events or callbacks when you have a server and many clients. This makes sense, as they explain, but will go against the grain of many accustomed to GUI application development.