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Advanced SOAP for Web Development

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Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is the killer application of XML. It's what makes XML really useful and fulfills the promise and hype of XML. SOAP gives you the "universal glue" to integrate virtually any distributed system and streamline virtually any Internet-based process or communication. Now you can master this remarkable technology -- with Advanced SOAP for Web Development. Dan Livingston teaches SOAP the way you want to learn it: hands-on, with real-world projects focused on the features you'll use ...
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Overview

Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is the killer application of XML. It's what makes XML really useful and fulfills the promise and hype of XML. SOAP gives you the "universal glue" to integrate virtually any distributed system and streamline virtually any Internet-based process or communication. Now you can master this remarkable technology -- with Advanced SOAP for Web Development. Dan Livingston teaches SOAP the way you want to learn it: hands-on, with real-world projects focused on the features you'll use most. Concise, practical, and full of code examples, Advanced SOAP for Web Development covers all this and more. SOAP isn't just another tool: It's the most powerful, flexible solution for integrating tomorrow's business-critical applications. You need to master it now -- and with this book, you will.
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Editorial Reviews

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The Barnes & Noble Review
SOAP is, umm, a very clean solution for integrating applications and sharing data across the Internet. If you want to master SOAP in a hurry, Dan Livingston's your man. In his Essentials guides, Livingston has delivered rapid mastery of technologies ranging from XML to JavaScript. Now he's brought his efficient, example-focused tutorial style to SOAP.

Don't let the title scare you: Livingston teaches SOAP from scratch. But he does take you to some pretty "advanced" territory. Livingston covers all of the standards that complement SOAP, including WDSL, UDDI, and even Disco, Microsoft's local solution for web services discovery.

There's detailed coverage of SOAP and RPC (including a chapter on XML-RPC, essentially a simpler, stripped-down SOAP with much shared history. You lose goodies like user-defined data types, but XML-RPC still lets you solve the core problem: transmitting, processing, and returning complex data structures).

Chapter-length projects walk you through setting up SOAP servers, clients, and web services. There's a full chapter on SOAP troubleshooting, and another on SOAP language bindings. The focus is on getting results -- and you will. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer with nearly 20 years' experience in helping technology companies deploy and market advanced software, computing, and networking products and services. He served for nearly ten years as vice president of a New Jersey–based marketing company, where he supervised a wide range of graphics and web design projects. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130356550
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 3/8/2002
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 6.08 (w) x 9.04 (h) x 1.33 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1 Why SOAP? Web Services and .NET 1
Ch. 2 Basic SOAP 19
Ch. 3 SOAP Data Types: Encoding and XML Schema 45
Ch. 4 HTTP and SOAP 79
Ch. 5 SOAP Security Extensions 109
Ch. 6 WSDL: Describing Web Services 133
Ch. 7 UDDI 183
Ch. 8 SOAP Message Attachments 217
Ch. 9 XML-RPC: SOAP's Little Runaway Brother 227
Ch. 10 Setting Up a Web Service 247
Ch. 11 BizTalk Server and SOAP 263
App. A XML Primer 287
App. B XML Schema Primer 295
App. C SOAP Compared with Other Distributed Object Technologies 331
App. D Future Directions of SOAP-XML Protocol Working Group 339
App. E Keeping Up-to-Date 341
App. F SOAP Tools 343
App. G UDDI API XML Schema 345
App. H The Original HTTP, as Defined in 1991 385
App. I SOAP 1.2 Working Draft 389
SOAP Glossary 473
Index 479
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Preface

Preface

Many people have called XML the Next Big Thing, but when pressed for reasons why, it can be difficult to get a clear answer out of them. SOAP may be the answer, though: It has the potential to be the killer app of XML. SOAP is the best method yet of transferring data from any application to any other application across the Internet.

Who This Book Is For

This book is for anyone who wants to keep their job in the field of Web technology, or is curious about XML and.NET. Seriously, the best way to survive in this economic climate is to constantly update your marketable skills and know all you can.

This book is aimed at Web developers and programmers. It will help if you know some XML already, but it's not necessary (there are some primers at the back of the book). You don't have to know anything about DCOM or Java or distributed architectures or activating objects. If you know those things, then your understanding of SOAP will be a deeper one than if you're a graphic designer who dabbles in ActionScript. The designers will not be at a severe disadvantage, though—everything is explained in full.

What You Will Learn

The goal of this book is to teach you everything you need to know about SOAP and its related technologies like WSDL and UDDI, as well as SOAP's place in Microsoft's.NET strategy. Everything in this book is focused on that goal. When you're done with this tome, you'll know what SOAP is, how it works, its strengths, and its weaknesses, as well as related technologies like WSDL, UDDI, and XML-RPC, and security extensions via SSL and XML Digital Signature. Of course, we'll also discuss Web services in general and.NET in somedetail.

What You Will Not Learn

This is a SOAP book, not a programming book. By that, I mean that this book is dedicated to focusing on SOAP. Since SOAP is a platform- and language-independent technology, I wanted to stay away from tons of code in C++ or Java, and focus just on SOAP. Since SOAP can fulfill an incredible number of programming needs, the odds of my using an example that you specifically would find useful are pretty slim. So I decided against puffing up the book with code you'd never use, and used that room to dig deeper into what SOAP really is.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

Many people have called XML the Next Big Thing, but when pressed for reasons why, it can be difficult to get a clear answer out of them. SOAP may be the answer, though: It has the potential to be the killer app of XML. SOAP is the best method yet of transferring data from any application to any other application across the Internet.

Who This Book Is For

This book is for anyone who wants to keep their job in the field of Web technology, or is curious about XML and .NET. Seriously, the best way to survive in this economic climate is to constantly update your marketable skills and know all you can.

This book is aimed at Web developers and programmers. It will help if you know some XML already, but it's not necessary (there are some primers at the back of the book). You don't have to know anything about DCOM or Java or distributed architectures or activating objects. If you know those things, then your understanding of SOAP will be a deeper one than if you're a graphic designer who dabbles in ActionScript. The designers will not be at a severe disadvantage, though—everything is explained in full.

What You Will Learn

The goal of this book is to teach you everything you need to know about SOAP and its related technologies like WSDL and UDDI, as well as SOAP's place in Microsoft's .NET strategy. Everything in this book is focused on that goal. When you're done with this tome, you'll know what SOAP is, how it works, its strengths, and its weaknesses, as well as related technologies like WSDL, UDDI, and XML-RPC, and security extensions via SSL and XML Digital Signature. Of course, we'll also discuss Web services in general and.NET in some detail.

The examples in this book are available at www.wire-man.com/soap, and you can write me at soap-dan@wire-man.com with your comments, questions, huzzahs, and flames.

What You Will Not Learn

This is a SOAP book, not a programming book. By that, I mean that this book is dedicated to focusing on SOAP. Since SOAP is a platform- and language-independent technology, I wanted to stay away from tons of code in C++ or Java, and focus just on SOAP. Since SOAP can fulfill an incredible number of programming needs, the odds of my using an example that you specifically would find useful are pretty slim. So I decided against puffing up the book with code you'd never use, and used that room to dig deeper into what SOAP really is.

Read More Show Less

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2002

    NOW I understand web services

    So web serivces is computers talking to each other and using each other over the Internet, and they use SOAP to talk to each other. I didn't really get that before I picked up this book, but Dan made it pretty easy. This book covers all aspects of what SOAP is, how it works, how it encodes data, and well as how it's used by .NET (you're led through creating your own web serivce), as well as WSDL (which describes web services), UDDI (which lists web serivices) and XML-RPC (a kind of SOAP competitor). Great book for understanding the role SOAP's playing in all this web services .NET hoopla you keep hearing about. Intelligent, conversational, and completely useful.

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