Advances in the Psychology of Human Intelligence

Advances in the Psychology of Human Intelligence

by Robert J. Sternberg
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0805804544

ISBN-13: 9780805804546

Pub. Date: 06/01/1989

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Volume five continues to mark the significant advances made in the psychology of human intelligence, problem solving, and thinking abilities. Papers contributed by leaders in the field reflect a diversity of perspectives and approaches to the human intelligence. Subjects discussed include:
• genetic and environmental contributions to

Overview

Volume five continues to mark the significant advances made in the psychology of human intelligence, problem solving, and thinking abilities. Papers contributed by leaders in the field reflect a diversity of perspectives and approaches to the human intelligence. Subjects discussed include:
• genetic and environmental contributions to information-processing abilities

• development of children's conceptions of intelligence

• skill acquisition as a bridge between intelligence and motivation

• information-processing abilities underlying intelligence

• costs of expertise and their relation to intelligence

• the nature of abstract thought

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805804546
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Publication date:
06/01/1989
Pages:
246
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)
Lexile:
1450L (what's this?)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Contents: R.J. Sternberg, Introduction. M. McGue, T.J. Bouchard, Jr., Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Information Processing and Special Mental Abilities: A Twin Analysis. K.M. Cain, C.S. Dweck, The Development of Children's Conceptions of Intelligence: A Theoretical Framework. R. Kanfer, P.L. Ackerman, Dynamics of Skill Acquisition: Building a Bridge Between Intelligence and Motivation. R.F. Dillon, Information Processing and Intelligence. P.A. Frensch, R.J. Sternberg, Expertise and Intelligent Thinking: When is it Worse to Know Better? D.L. Medin, B.H. Ross, The Specific Character of Abstract Thought: Categorization, Problem-Solving, and Induction.

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