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Adventures in American bookshops, antique stores and auction rooms
     

Adventures in American bookshops, antique stores and auction rooms

by Guido Bruno
 
Adventures in American bookshops, antique stores and auction rooms

This book, "Adventures in American bookshops, antique stores and auction rooms", by Guido Bruno, is a replication of a book originally published before 1922. It has been restored by human beings, page by page, so that you may enjoy it in a form as close to the original as possible.

Overview

Adventures in American bookshops, antique stores and auction rooms

This book, "Adventures in American bookshops, antique stores and auction rooms", by Guido Bruno, is a replication of a book originally published before 1922. It has been restored by human beings, page by page, so that you may enjoy it in a form as close to the original as possible.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940017646489
Publisher:
Detroit : The Douglas book shop
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
216 KB

Read an Excerpt


The Strange Discovery and Disappearance of Stuart's Washington ANTIQUE shops are isles of romance and mystery in the commonplace everyday life of New York, but if you wish to enter into the real thrill of adventure, you must forget the fashionable shop, where antiques have found a temporary resting place and you must not talk to the shop-keeper. Antique shops along Fifth Avenue and the main streets are conducted as up-to-date business places, and up-to- date business has a romance of its own, a twentieth century romance that has little to do with the individual and less with sacred time-honored traditions that touch the heart. Most antique dealers kill the charm their curios and works of art awaken in us. They know the prices of the beautiful and ugly things on sale in their shops, but they don't know their value. Antique dealers are painful whenever they try to impress you with their knowledge of art or of association or history, or when they simply play on the vanity of prospective customers, telling in whose possession the priceless object has been, quoting prices like stock brokers. Whenever I spend some time in an antique shop I think of George Bernard Shaw's essay: "On Going to Church": "What wonderful and ideal places would churches be if there were no priests and no services to disturb the sublime quiet and the elevating beauty of the edifices." What charming places for dreams and revery would antique shops be if there were no antique dealers and no ambitious millionaires, who wish to show their appreciation of art by paying exorbitant prices for art objects. "Then the museum is an ideal place," I hear you say. No, it isn't. The museum is a mausoleum of art. The artobjects there seem to me buried forever in costly catacombs with beautiful monuments and tombsto...

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