The Adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha

The Adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha

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by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
     
 

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Don Quixote, originally published in two parts in 1605 and 1615, stands as Cervantes' belated but colossal literary success. A work which has achieved mythic status, it is considered to have pioneered the modern novel. Don Quixote, a poor gentleman from La Mancha, Spain, entranced by the code of chivalry, seeks romantic honor through absurd and fantastic

Overview

Don Quixote, originally published in two parts in 1605 and 1615, stands as Cervantes' belated but colossal literary success. A work which has achieved mythic status, it is considered to have pioneered the modern novel. Don Quixote, a poor gentleman from La Mancha, Spain, entranced by the code of chivalry, seeks romantic honor through absurd and fantastic adventures. His fevered imagination turns everyday objects into heroic opponents and stepping stones to greater glory; each exploit serves as a comic, yet disturbing commentary on the psychological struggle between reality and illusion, fact and fiction. This celebrated translation by Charles Jarvis offers a new introduction and notes which provide essential background information.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As in Williams's Greek Myths for Young Children and Joseph and His Magnificent Coat of Many Colors , engagingly busy, ornately bordered, comic strip-style artwork gives new and buoyant life to a familiar story. The characteristic understatement of her text, juxtaposed with the humorous mutterings of a quirky cast (delivered in cartoon balloons), breezily chronicles Quixote's hapless quest to ``right all wrongs and protect all damsels.'' (Though Williams's rendition seems appropriate for the intended audience, literary purists may object on principle to the abridgement of such a venerable classic.) Here the would-be knight is rendered as quite the buffoon, as he prepares to tilt at windmills he mistakes for ``giants'' and battle two ``armies'' that are actually flocks of sheep. Time after time, Quixote and sidekick Sancho Panza are badly battered (the former is shown losing his ear and some teeth), but always brush themselves off and continue ``on their way in search of new adventure worthy of so famous a knight and his faithful squire.'' A fun way to become acquainted with this masterpiece. Ages 7-up. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
As she has with other stories, Greek Myths, Sinbad and Robin Hood, Williams creates another comic strip version of a well-known tale. The "official" story run along with the cartoons while comments and asides are presented within the cartoon frames. This particular tale, about an eccentric country gentleman who imagines himself a knight who must right wrongs, may be a little difficult for the publisher's suggested age group (5 and up). It will probably work better for older elementary kids and reluctant readers. 1995 (orig.
Library Journal
Cervantes's masterpiece Don Quixote , Henry Fielding's favorite novel, was also much admired by Fielding's contemporary Smollett, who published a vigorous, highly readable translation in 1755. Eighteenth-century collections will be enriched by this edition (not reissued since the 19th century, and never published in America), which includes Smollett's life of Cervantes, his note on the translation, and his annotations to the novel. The foreword and introduction by Fuentes, however, are disappointing; concentrating on Cervantes and his times they tell us almost nothing about the raison d'etre for this edition, Smollett's translation. Smollett's pungent, jocular prose is ideally suited for his task; his translation makes a delightful alternative to the various attempts to render Don Quixote into modern English. Peter Sabor, English Dept., Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ont.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140440102
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
02/28/1951
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Pages:
944
Product dimensions:
4.92(w) x 7.74(h) x 1.49(d)

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Milan Kundera
The novelist teaches the reader to comprehend the world of a question.
—(Milan Kundera

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University of Edinburgh

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Adventures of Don Quixote de la Mancha 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
mellow70s More than 1 year ago
This is unacceptable. If B&N is going to make some books available in its ebookstore, it ought to have some quality control. Don't just scan a book, run it through the character recognition software and then post the file. At least have someone try reading through it and correct the words that the software misread. Sure, B&N is "giving it away." But that does not make it free. I wasted time downloading it and trying to begin reading it before realizing that this was crap. B&N would be better off not posting stuff like this at all than posting something like this.
Robert George More than 1 year ago
This book was translated by a google project to digitize books; as this is a difficult task, there are rampant errors in the body of the text. I reccomend going to the project gutenberg web site for a far superior copy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don Quixote is the unique story of a great knight born five hundred years behind his time. The story starts out when Don Quejada, the lord of his manor in Spain, losses his grip between reality and the fantasy world in his books. Don Quejada spends all of his time reading books and, when he finally looses it, he decides that to become a knight he must embark on a great adventure to protect the world from tyranny with his great knightly skills. Along the way, he changes his name to Don Quixote de la Mancha and convinces a Spanish farmer, Sancho Panza, that he must be Quixote's squire and follow his along his many knightly escapades. The adventures that Don Quixote and Sancho encounter all have comical overtone to them beacause of the time that they live in but one has to feel sorry for the knight because he makes such a fool of himself and is clearly mad with no one to help him back to a state sanity.

Setting makes this story unique. The fact that he is a knight living in the 1600's points to that fact that Quixote is born 500 years too late. While this makes for many hilarious adventures, it also makes the reader feel sorry for the character because many people are down on him. This story is also unique in the sense that it basically tells the story of man who lets his imagination run away with him, he loses any sigh on reality and sees only what he has read in his stories. Setting in this story is so important because had Don Quixote been born in a different era he might have been revered for his knightly intentions instead of being beaten and ridiculed.

Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So disappointed.
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Adakar More than 1 year ago
Free it may be, but I couldn't even get past the first 2 pages! The translation software/BN dropped the ball on this one. Just way to many errors to make it readable.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. even if it took me three months to read it. i finally got done. I know that Cervantes knew what he was talking about. He did a great job on this book and i'm happy that they made a few movies about it. I am writing my review for my 9th grade English II class.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book marvels in the relms of true artistic writing. Cervantes is a man who loves to get to the end of his tunnel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought that Don Quixote was a great book! I love how Don Quixote is always going on some new adventure that almost always ends up funny. I love the words Don Quixote uses because he thinks he's a knight. When I finished reading this book it made me want to turn knight errant myself. I thought that though Don Quixote is ridiculed and beaten, he is a true knight and gentleman. This book shows a person who has the courage to pursue his dream no matter what the odds are. Don Quixote is now my personal hero.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I knew the name of Don Quixote, but I had never read it until this year. When I open first page of this book, I couldn't stop reading until the end. Wow, this is the greatest novel I've ever read in my life. I think all the basic elements of comedy is origianally started from Cervantes. Amongst many translated versions of 'Don Quixote', I think Mr.Cohen's one is the best.