Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy / Edition 1

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: A Case Study in Critical Controversy / Edition 1

by Mark Twain, James Phelan, Gerald Graff
     
 

Floating down the Mississippi on their raft, Huckleberry Finn and Jim, a runaway slave, find life filled with excitement and the spirit of adventure. Join Huck and Jim and their old friend Tom Sawyer as they come up against low-down thieves and murderers, whilst being chased by Huck's evil, drunken father who is after Huck's treasure. It is a trip that you will never… See more details below

Overview

Floating down the Mississippi on their raft, Huckleberry Finn and Jim, a runaway slave, find life filled with excitement and the spirit of adventure. Join Huck and Jim and their old friend Tom Sawyer as they come up against low-down thieves and murderers, whilst being chased by Huck's evil, drunken father who is after Huck's treasure. It is a trip that you will never tire of.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312112257
Publisher:
Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date:
02/01/1995
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
550
Product dimensions:
5.52(w) x 8.27(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Mark Twain was a humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. Twain is most noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which has since been called the Great American Novel, and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. During his lifetime, Twain became a friend to presidents, artists, leading industrialists and European royalty

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
November 30, 1835
Date of Death:
April 21, 1910
Place of Birth:
Florida, Missouri
Place of Death:
Redding, Connecticut

Table of Contents

Preface
Why Study Critical Controversies?1
Pt. 1Mark Twain and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
The Life of Samuel Clemens and the Reception of Huckleberry Finn19
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: The 1885 Text27
A Portfolio of Illustrations from the 1885 Edition266
Pt. 2A Case Study in Critical Controversy
The Controversy over the Ending: Did Mark Twain Sell Jim down the River?279
A Certain Formal Aptness284
The Boy and the River: Without Beginning or End286
Mr. Eliot, Mr. Trilling, and Huckleberry Finn290
Attacks on the Ending and Twain's Attack on Conscience305
Overreaching: Critical Agenda and the Ending of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn312
The Controversy over Race: Does Huckleberry Finn Combat or Reinforce Racist Attitudes?335
Morality and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn340
Born to Trouble: One Hundred Years of Huckleberry Finn348
The Struggle for Tolerance: Race and Censorship in Huckleberry Finn359
Kemble's "Specialty" and the Pictorial Countertext of Huckleberry Finn383
From Was Huck Black?407
More than a Reader's Response: A Letter to "De Ole True Huck"450
On the Nature and Status of Covert Texts: A Reply to Gerry Brenner's "Letter to 'De Ole True Huck'"468
The Controversy over Gender and Sexuality: Are Twain's Sexual Politics Progressive, Regressive, or Beside the Point?480
Reformers and Young Maidens: Women and Virtue in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn485
Reading Gender in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn505
Walker versus Jehlen versus Twain518
A Response to Frederick Crews525
Come Back to the Raft Ag'in, Huck Honey!528
"Innocent Homosexuality": The Fiedler Thesis in Retrospect535

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