Overview

Discover Moses and the Bulrushers
You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was
made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was
...
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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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Overview

Discover Moses and the Bulrushers
You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was
made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was
things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I
never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt
Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly—Tom's Aunt Polly, she
is—and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book,
which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before.
Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the
money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six
thousand dollars apiece—all gold. It was an awful sight of money when
it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest,
and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round— more than a
body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas she took me for
her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in
the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the
widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit
out. I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free
and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going
to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow
and be respectable. So I went back.
The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she
called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it.
She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but
sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced
again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come
to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but
you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a
little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter
with them,—that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a
4
barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice
kind of swaps around, and the things go better.
After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and
the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and
by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so
then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in
dead people.
Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she
wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must
try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get
down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was abothering
about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody,
being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a
thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff, too; of course that
was all right, because she done it herself.
Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on,
had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spellingbook.
She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the
widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an
hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say,
"Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry;" and "Don't scrunch up like
that, Huckleberry—set up straight;" and pretty soon she would say,
"Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry—why don't you try to behave?"
Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I
was there. She got mad then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted
was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular.
She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the
whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I
couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up
my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only
make trouble, and wouldn't do no good.
Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the
good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around
all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think
much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer
would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad
about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.
Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome.
By and by they fetched the ...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014556460
  • Publisher: All classic book warehouse
  • Publication date: 4/26/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 255
  • Sales rank: 1,144,549
  • File size: 986 KB

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