The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Tom Sawyer's Comrade

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Tom Sawyer's Comrade

3.9 429
by Mark Twain

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Revered by all of the town's children and dreaded by all of its mothers, Huckleberry Finn is indisputably the most appealing child-hero in American literature.

Unlike the tall-tale, idyllic world of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is firmly grounded in early reality. From the abusive drunkard who serves as Huckleberry's father, to

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Revered by all of the town's children and dreaded by all of its mothers, Huckleberry Finn is indisputably the most appealing child-hero in American literature.

Unlike the tall-tale, idyllic world of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is firmly grounded in early reality. From the abusive drunkard who serves as Huckleberry's father, to Huck's first tentative grappling with issues of personal liberty and the unknown, Huckleberry Finn endeavors to delve quite a bit deeper into the complexities-both joyful and tragic of life.

Editorial Reviews

Ernest Hemingway
All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.

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CreateSpace Publishing
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6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.15(d)
Age Range:
8 Years

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I Discover Moses and the Bulrushers

YOU DON'T KNOW about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly - Tom's Aunt Polly, she is - and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before.

Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round - more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit out. I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back.

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and felt all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them - that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by and by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people.

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.

Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spelling book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say, "Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry"; and "Don't scrunch up like that, Huckleberry - set up straight"; and pretty soon she would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry - why don't you try to behave?" Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad then, but I didn't mean no harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn't do no good.

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By and by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle, and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn't no use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that's on its mind and can't make itself understood, and so can't rest easy in its grave, and has to go about that way every night grieving. I got so downhearted and scared I did wish I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn't need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn't no confidence. You do that when you've lost a horseshoe that you've found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but I hadn't ever heard anybody say it was any way to keep off bad luck when you'd killed a spider.

I set down again, a-shaking all over, and got out my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death now, and so the widow wouldn't know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock away off in the town go boom - boom - boom - twelve licks; and all still again - stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees - something was a-stirring. I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a "me-yow! me-yow!" down there. That was good! Says I, "me-yow! me-yow!" as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me.

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What People are saying about this

Ernest Hemingway
All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since.
T. S. Eliot
...We come to see Huck... as one of the permanent symbolic figures of fiction; not unworthy to tak e a place with Ulysses, Faust, Don Quixote, Don Juan, Hamlet, and other great discoveries that man has made about himself.
Lionel Trilling
One can read it at ten and then annually ever after, and each year find that it is as fresh as the year before...

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Illustrated Junior Library Series) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 429 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like this book very much. It does get a little boring in the middle, but the ending is my favorite! It's worth reading.
AnnFerguson1 More than 1 year ago
The story is a classic but this e-version was not the worst nor the best. There are funny breaks and odd fonts randomly placed through the story. It is worth looking for a better e-version.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is easy to read and understand.
Keri Kelly More than 1 year ago
BORING. With occasional excitment. Hard to understand at times because of the old english language the characters use, but overall well written. I just wish it could have been a little more of a page turner. I prefer Tom Sawyer over Huck Finn.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book, very interesting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This classic story is a marvelous example of Mark Twain's writing skills and of his prominence as a writer. This story is hilarious and heartwarming, and is sure to enchant anyone who reads it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved reading this book from front to back it is on of the greaatest books ive ever read ndd ull love it too
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Twain initially conceived of the work as a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer that would follow Huck Finn through adulthood. Beginning with a few pages he had removed from the earlier novel, Twain began work on a manuscript he originally titled Huckleberry Finn's Autobiography. Twain worked on the manuscript off and on for the next several years, ultimately abandoning his original plan of following Huck's development into adulthood. He appeared to have lost interest in the manuscript while it was in progress, and set it aside for several years. After making a trip down the Mississippi, Twain returned to his work on the novel. Upon completion, the novel's title closely paralleled its predecessor's: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade). Unlike The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn does not have the definite article "the" as a part of its proper title. Essayist and critic Spencer Neve states that this absence represents the "never fulfilled anticipations" of Huck's adventures-while Tom's adventures were completed (at least at the time) by the end of his novel, Huck's narrative ends with his stated intention to head West
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ok guys, this book is actually really good. It is filled with delightful humor and perspective into what life use to be like. I highly recomend it to anyone, though some individuals may need a dictionary, the syntax is awesome. I understand that Huckleberry Finn might have somewhat of a bad reputation but i think its just misunderstood.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good but it was confusing because the copy wasnt very good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A very favorited classic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the story but when they talk it is kinda hard to umderstand because they talk with a southern acent. If you can get past that it is a good book for 10-12 yo.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was just as fresh as I remember reading more than 20 years ago. A true American classic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoy the books by Mark Twain, generally, but this book was a little different. I'm not saying i didn't like it, but it was different. The story was great but, at times i got a little bit confused because the author kept rambling on and on and on about semi-irrelevant things. I recommend it but it wasn't my favorite. Also, the part where Tom Sawyer comes in is a little boring and it seems to drag a bit. It is a good book to read for a book report or something like that!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I can't type much, seein' as how I've got to be off finishing my report on Twain, but would like to say just a few things first. One! this is an excellent book and is written in an excellent style. Twain uses the language of the time, and that really gives life to the story. As a story itself it is extreemly exciting and is worth your time! Two! the people who said this book is boring really do need to get their head examined. This is not just a story about some kids trying to be bandits in a club, or some kid and his nigger floating down the mississippi on a raft. This book was written by Twain to deal with the moral and racial issues of the time. Much of which (especially in the moral bit) still applies today, which makes it one of the most highly regarded American Novels of all time. I could ramble on about much more but really I must finish my bit on Huck Finn and then start on my bit for Connecticut Yankee
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was mesmerized for about 7 hours. This was the best read audio book I have ever heard.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very good book - quick reading as the scenery, adventures and characters change often. Moral issues also presented. A boy who is not afraid to overcome the poor circumstances that he is born into.
Guest More than 1 year ago
really, really, really good book or something. almost as good as poncho's frito's war of love or something.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When looking at the world through a child's eyes, the simple things we take for granted emerge so clearly. Through out the hard times and the good, a child always carries that ever-burning flame of hope. This flame represents the very meaning of the human spirit. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, this flame burns bright in one young man. As Mark Twain so brilliantly narrates the story through the thirteen-year-old Huck's eyes, the reader quickly gets swept into the story. Feeling every twist and turn of Huck's life and watching that flame glow bright and sometimes very dim. It's amazing to see how Huck's life flows through the pages of the book. Even when he is faced with bitter family feuds, corrupt and dangerous con men or even slave hunters, he pulls through and bounces back just like a river does. Huck's life is the perfect example of how the human spirit always pushes through to see another precious day. Mark Twain was truly 'forced' as he would say to become a novelist by writing this book because he goes so deep into the mind of Huck that often the reader can not tell weather Twain or Huck is speaking. Mark Twain is also forced by this book to take the reader deeper and keep them hooked with magnificent descriptions of great summer storms and beautiful sunrises over the Mississippi or with the unusual small town characters that in someway we can all identify with. He also makes us think about what it means to truly be free. Twain always captures the mind, encourages the spirit, and touches the heart each time he writes, which is probably what moved Ernest Hemingway to say that 'modern American literature began with Huckleberry Finn.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
Both Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn are classics that all children should read. The stories of these two 'free spirits' are captivating. Most children can only dream of experiencing the lives of these, for the most part, fancy free rogues, and can live their adventures in reading the books. The books of course are not just for children, but for everyone, which helps make them masterpieces.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i think its funny how twain writes in this book, because u get the atmosphere of how a ten year old thinks. I LOVED THE BOOK HIGHLY RECOMMEND IT
Guest More than 1 year ago
As controversial as it remains, Huckleberry Finn offers two of the finest moments in American literature. Many will either appreciate or rebuke the comedy and biting wit. But you would have to be oblivious to things like earthquakes to not be moved by the apology scene, or by Huck's acceptance of damnation. This story does not pretend to offer solutions to the problems men create among themselves. It does offer a few quick and brilliant illustrations of our ability to transcend those problems.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just a fun book! You read this book and it is just plain fun and adventure. The Royal Nonesuch has to be the funniest scheme I've come across in reading over 40 literature books!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book, quite superior, in my opinion, to 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer', is definitely one of the best I have read lately. It presents various adventures that Huck has as he goes down the river with Jim, an honorable Black man who wishes to obtain his freedom. Loaded with humor and criticism, the book is also very readable, and the way Twain makes each of the characters speak, in a variety of dialects, enrich and give flavor to the book. Huck's practical vision of the world, and his severe moral doubts about how right it was to break the law, the portrayal of the uneducated but honorable Jim, the weirdness and odd tricks of the 'King' and 'Duke', the diversity of situations that Huck encounters on his journey, and the freshness that the reader can actually feel as he imagines himself going down a river on a raft, lying face up in the night looking at the stars are all elements that really make this book stand out. Quite recommndable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago