The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn / Edition 1

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn / Edition 1

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by Mark Twain
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0534522076

ISBN-13: 9780534522070

Pub. Date: 07/13/2004

Publisher: Cengage Learning

About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, or Mark Twain, as he was better known was born on November 30, 1835 in Florida, Missouri, the sixth child of John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens. His father ran a dry goods and grocery store, practiced law and involved himself in local politics after the family's move to Hannibal, Missouri, when Sam was four

Overview

About the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens, or Mark Twain, as he was better known was born on November 30, 1835 in Florida, Missouri, the sixth child of John Marshall and Jane Lampton Clemens. His father ran a dry goods and grocery store, practiced law and involved himself in local politics after the family's move to Hannibal, Missouri, when Sam was four years old.

Hannibal seems to have been a good place for a boy to grow up. Sam was entranced by the Mississippi River and enjoyed both the barges and the people who traveled on them. When Sam was just eleven his father died and Sam went to work for his brother at the Hannibal Journal first as a printer's apprentice and later a compositor. While still in his teens Sam went on the road as an itinerant printer. In 1857 he conceived a plan to seek his fortune in South America but on the way he met a steamboat captain, Horace Bixby who took him on as a cub riverboat pilot and taught him until he acquired his own license.

This enjoyable style of life, which Twain always spoke of later with special warmth was ended by the Civil War. Twain went west with his brother Orion to prospect in Nevada but in 1862 joined the staff of the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise, a paper to which he had already begun submitting his work. Later Twain went to California and submitted "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County" to the New York Saturday Press.

By 1871 Twain had published Innocents Abroad and had married Olivia Langdon, the sister of a friend from a socially prominent New York City family. He and his wife moved to Hartford, Connecticut, where they made their family home for thenext 20 years.

Books that he wrote in Hartford confirmed his popular reputation but despite their success Twain found himself in financial difficulty primarily because of his investments in the Paige typesetting business as well as his own publishing company. Eventually Twain was forced to declare bankruptcy.

Twain's last major books were successful commercially but they also reflect his increasing pessimism. His satire becomes at times more biting and mean-spirited than it is humorous. Despite the downturn in Twain's outlook in later life and despite the unevenness of much of his work, he remains one of the major writers of the American nineteenth century, and one who has been enormously influential on subsequent writers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780534522070
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Publication date:
07/13/2004
Series:
Wadsworth Classics Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.50(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Samuel Clemens/Mark Twain: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Appendix A: Related Mark Twain Texts

  1. “A True Story Reprinted Word for Word as I Heard It,” The Atlantic Monthly (November 1874)
  2. From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876)
  3. From Life on the Mississippi (1883)
  4. “Jim’s Ghost Story,” excluded manuscript passage from Huckleberry Finn (1876)
  5. Sequel to Huckleberry Finn, from Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894)
  6. Introducing Huckleberry Finn (1895)
  7. From “Chapters from My Autobiography, XIII,” North American Review (March 1907)

Appendix B: Contemporary Representations of Slavery and Race

  1. From “The Negro Out of Politics,” Chicago Tribune (24 April 1877)
  2. Blackface Minstrelsy (1880, 1884)
  3. “Tom Shows” (1882)
  4. From Thomas Nelson Page, “Mars Chan,” Century Magazine (April 1884)
  5. From George Washington Cable, “The Freedman’s Case in Equity,” Century Magazine (January 1885)

Appendix C: Illustrating Huckleberry Finn

  1. E.W. Kemble, Illustration for The Thompson Street Poker Club (1884)
  2. From E.W. Kemble, “Illustrating Huckleberry Finn,” The Colophon (February 1930)
  3. E.W. Kemble, Illustration of African Slavery, Century Magazine (February 1890)
  4. E.W. Kemble, New Illustrations for Huckleberry Finn (1899)

Appendix D: Selling Huckleberry Finn

  1. Sales Prospectus Blurb for Huckleberry Finn (1884)
  2. Sales Prospectus Poster for Huckleberry Finn (1884)
  3. Promotional Flyer for Huck Finn (1885)
  4. “Twins of Genius” Lecture Program Minneapolis-St. Paul (24 January 1885)
  5. Advertisement from Webster & Co. Catalogue Advertising Editions of Huck Finn (1892)

Appendix E: Reception of Huckleberry Finn

  1. Reviews
    1. Athenaeum (27 December 1884)
    2. Brander Matthews, Saturday Review (31 January 1885)
    3. Hartford Courant (20 February 1885)
    4. Life (26 February 1885)
    5. Boston Evening Traveler (5 March 1885)
    6. Daily Evening Bulletin (14 March 1885)
    7. San Francisco Chronicle (15 March 1885)
    8. T.S. Perry, The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine (May 1885)
    9. The Atlanta Constitution (26 May 1885)
  2. Coverage of Concord Library’s Banning of Huckleberry Finn
    1. New York Herald (18 March 1885)
    2. Literary World (21 March 1885)
    3. San Francisco Chronicle (29 March 1885)
    4. The Critic (30 May 1885)
    5. Hartford Courant, with Mark Twain’s response (4 April 1885)
  3. Reviews of Twain’s Performance of the Novel Onstage
    1. The Washington Post (25 November 1884)
    2. The Globe (9 December 1884)
    3. The Pittsburgh Dispatch (30 December 1884)
    4. The Cincinnati Enquirer (4 January 1885)
    5. The Minneapolis Daily Tribune (25 January 1885)
    6. Wisconsin State Journal (28 January 1885)
    7. Chicago Daily Tribune (3 February 1885)

Appendix F: Freedom versus Fate

  1. From The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876)
  2. From Life on the Mississippi (1883)
  3. From A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (1889)
  4. From “Corn-Pone Opinions” (1901)
  5. From Twain’s Seventieth Birthday Dinner Speech (1905)
  6. From “The Turning Point of My Life,” Harper’s Bazaar (February 1911)

Select Bibliography

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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
courtneyjean More than 1 year ago
Huckleberry Finn is a young boy who has been adopted by Widow Douglas due to difficulties with his drunken father. After becoming acquainted with her strict ways, Huck is kidnapped by his father, wanting Huck's money for alcohol. After spending months in a deserted house in the woods, Huck finally escapes, and decides to run away. On his voyage, he runs into Jim, Widow Douglas's slave. Together, they embark on a journey, filled with both misfortune and adventure. During this extended journey, Huckleberry and Jim endure snake bites, being mixed up in a series of murders, becoming separated from each other multiple times, running into trouble with the King, and much more. Throughout the long nights on the river they spend together, Jim and Huck become the best of friends. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a timeless classic. Written as a sequel to the book the Adventures of Tom Sawyer, this book provides a second side of the story. Although it is written in a way which is slightly hard to understand, the writing style emphasizes the various personalities of the characters. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a timeless classic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is an excellent specimen of American Literature. I found the book to be extremely thought provoking with many hidden messages disguised in the characters and their actions throughout the entire story. Huck Finn is more than just a book written for entertainment, Twain explores the various gender roles and stereotypes that existed in the late 1800s in a comical manner. Twain discusses slavery in American Society through the characters, Huck and Jim. He looks at civilization as seen through the eyes of Huck as compared to the eyes of Miss Watson. Twain explores relationships between Pap and Huck, and Jim and Huck. Twain even tackles the concept of imagination as seen through Jim¿s superstitious nature. Although Huck and Jim are the main characters that Twain uses to demonstrate his opinions, he also uses a plethora of other characters throughout the novel including, the Duke and the Dauphin, the Shepardsons and the Grangerfords, the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson, and Tom Sawyer. Overall, I absolutely loved this book. Not only was it thought provoking, but also humorous at the same time. Twain tackles many topics that were considered controversial at the time, and puts himself on the line for criticism. I would recommend this book to anyone with an open mind who is willing to look at society in a different light, and who wants to be entertained at the same time.