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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Audio Package

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Overview


Audio Includes: 1 paperback and 1 audio CD. Timeless Classics--designed for the struggling reader and adapted to retain the integrity of the original classic. These classic novels will grab a student's attention from the first page. Included are eight pages of end-of-book activities to enhance the reading experience. Audio sets for each titles are paced for students to follow the text word-for-word and include one classic novel and two audio CDs-more help struggling readers. ...
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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Overview


Audio Includes: 1 paperback and 1 audio CD. Timeless Classics--designed for the struggling reader and adapted to retain the integrity of the original classic. These classic novels will grab a student's attention from the first page. Included are eight pages of end-of-book activities to enhance the reading experience. Audio sets for each titles are paced for students to follow the text word-for-word and include one classic novel and two audio CDs-more help struggling readers.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781562543105
  • Publisher: Saddleback Educational Publishing
  • Publication date: 6/15/2001
  • Series: Timeless Classics Series
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Classics
  • Sales rank: 736,883
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Twain
Riverboat pilot, journalist, failed businessman (several times over): Samuel Clemens -- the man behind the figure of “Mark Twain” -- led many lives. But it was in his novels and short stories that he created a voice and an outlook on life that will be forever identified with the American character.

Biography

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens on November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri; his family moved to the port town of Hannibal four years later. His father, an unsuccessful farmer, died when Twain was eleven. Soon afterward the boy began working as an apprentice printer, and by age sixteen he was writing newspaper sketches. He left Hannibal at eighteen to work as an itinerant printer in New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Cincinnati. From 1857 to 1861 he worked on Mississippi steamboats, advancing from cub pilot to licensed pilot.

After river shipping was interrupted by the Civil War, Twain headed west with his brother Orion, who had been appointed secretary to the Nevada Territory. Settling in Carson City, he tried his luck at prospecting and wrote humorous pieces for a range of newspapers. Around this time he first began using the pseudonym Mark Twain, derived from a riverboat term. Relocating to San Francisco, he became a regular newspaper correspondent and a contributor to the literary magazine the Golden Era. He made a five-month journey to Hawaii in 1866 and the following year traveled to Europe to report on the first organized tourist cruise. The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and Other Sketches (1867) consolidated his growing reputation as humorist and lecturer.

After his marriage to Livy Langdon, Twain settled first in Buffalo, New York, and then for two decades in Hartford, Connecticut. His European sketches were expanded into The Innocents Abroad (1869), followed by Roughing It (1872), an account of his Western adventures; both were enormously successful. Twain's literary triumphs were offset by often ill-advised business dealings (he sank thousands of dollars, for instance, in a failed attempt to develop a new kind of typesetting machine, and thousands more into his own ultimately unsuccessful publishing house) and unrestrained spending that left him in frequent financial difficulty, a pattern that was to persist throughout his life.

Following The Gilded Age (1873), written in collaboration with Charles Dudley Warner, Twain began a literary exploration of his childhood memories of the Mississippi, resulting in a trio of masterpieces --The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Life on the Mississippi (1883), and finally The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), on which he had been working for nearly a decade. Another vein, of historical romance, found expression in The Prince and the Pauper (1882), the satirical A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889), and Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896), while he continued to draw on his travel experiences in A Tramp Abroad (1880) and Following the Equator (1897). His close associates in these years included William Dean Howells, Bret Harte, and George Washington Cable, as well as the dying Ulysses S. Grant, whom Twain encouraged to complete his memoirs, published by Twain's publishing company in 1885.

For most of the 1890s Twain lived in Europe, as his life took a darker turn with the death of his daughter Susy in 1896 and the worsening illness of his daughter Jean. The tone of Twain's writing also turned progressively more bitter. The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894), a detective story hinging on the consequences of slavery, was followed by powerful anti-imperialist and anticolonial statements such as 'To the Person Sitting in Darkness' (1901), 'The War Prayer' (1905), and 'King Leopold's Soliloquy' (1905), and by the pessimistic sketches collected in the privately published What Is Man? (1906). The unfinished novel The Mysterious Stranger was perhaps the most uncompromisingly dark of all Twain's later works. In his last years, his financial troubles finally resolved, Twain settled near Redding, Connecticut, and died in his mansion, Stormfield, on April 21, 1910.

Author biography courtesy of Random House, Inc.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Samuel Langhorne Clemens (real name); Sieur Louis de Conte
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 30, 1835
    2. Place of Birth:
      Florida, Missouri
    1. Date of Death:
      April 21, 1910
    2. Place of Death:
      Redding, Connecticut

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 54 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 54 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2007

    okay

    I think this book was good, but at some parts it was kind of boring. The way it is narrated by Huck is perfect, because that's the way people talked at that time. When Jim talked, it was strange, because some words were written wrong and that mixed up what he was saying.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2007

    Had to keep reading!

    We had to read this book in English class for Junior year. I enjoyed it alot! It is amazing! The improper grammer is hard to follow at times, especially Jim but otherwise most people in our Class LOVE IT!!!! great reading!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2005

    Amazing, Classic, Funny. Why was it ever banned?

    Huckleberry Finn was once said to be the source of all american literarture. Earnest Hemingway said that and was right. Huck Finn and his friend Jim, a slave, have some amazing and amusing journeys as they travel down the Mississippi River. Recommended for anyone looking for a laugh and a life lesson.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2014

    .

    .

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  • Posted November 25, 2014

    This book is very hard to read.With southern accents the sentenc

    This book is very hard to read.With southern accents the sentences are like ‘’How we gwyne git em?’’ Its very hard to understand. I understand why the author did this because it was in older times.So the English wasn’t the greatest.When I read this book every time i got to a wierd scentence I had to sound out every word to figure out what the author was trying to say.The story itself wasn’t bad but I had trouble at some parts trying to read.I didn’t like how this book was written.

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  • Posted October 4, 2014

    It was so exciting and marvelous. I thought it was a new adventu

    It was so exciting and marvelous. I thought it was a new adventure each chapter and it was so adorable to experience Huck's and Jim's friendship evolve and grow. I wanted to just keep reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2014

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  • Posted February 20, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a sequel of sorts.  First

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a sequel of sorts.  First came The Adventures of Tom Sawyer which Huckleberry Finn was a character in just as Tom Sawyer was in this one.  In this adventure Huckleberry runs away from his alcoholic father and along the way runs into a slave Jim, who is trying to gain his freedom.   As they stop in towns along the river they always seem to run into trouble.




    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was more enjoyable to read on my own then it was to read for school.   Huck definitely has a original imagination to get them through all the hijinks they go through.




    I felt that by the Tom Sawyer showed up the book could and probably should have ended.  Many of the people in the town were pretty gullible to believe Huck, Tom and other characters like the Duke or King. 




    An Interesting read. Not sure I understand why it is a classic except that is by Mark Twain.  I could see the authors humor throughout the book, which he was known for. 

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  • Posted April 11, 2013

    Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

    3 Stars

    Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain <br />
    <br />
    3 Stars <br />
    <br />
    This is the sequel to Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. It starts out were it left off. Huck is kidnapped by his dad who wants his money. His dad is a horrible person and a drunk. Huck meets an escaping slave Jim along the way and they set off in search of the freedom they are both looking for. This of course leads to many amusing adventures. They get into all sorts of things and meet up with a lot of questionable characters on the Mississippi river. Jim gets caught and is being held as a runaway slave. Huck decides that he must go save him even if it means he will go to hell. Arriving at the plantation where Jim is being kept leads to a whole new adventure and the arrival of help to pull off stealing Jim back and setting him free for good.<br />
    <br />
    This is one of those books that I wish I had read when I was young and was reading adventures like Call of The Wild and the like. I know I would have loved it then. That is the only reason for the 3 stars. It was a good read and amusing but I didn't relate with it as much at this time. The imagination that is involved in these stories is wonderful. I had to laugh at the reasons things were accomplished the way they were so that they would be done right and moral in keeping with stories of great adventurers. Because who could possibly want to do anything the simple way. It did make me long for the days when using that imagination made for the best times ever.<br />

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2012

    Suprisingly Good Read

    I never thought I would actually enjoy reading this book but was pleasantly surprised. Twain intertwined good humor with meaningful themes making for a book that made you not only laugh at all the ingenious plotlines but also think about the cruelties of our so-called "sivilized" world. You truly fall in love with these characters. I recommend this book to anyone searching for an adventure, comedy, or heartwarming and meaningful book. An honestly wonderful read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2007

    A reviewer

    This book is about the adventure of a young man traviling down the mississippi river after running away from his abusive father. He meet meny people in his travils and learns alot about life. This book have fowl language and is intended for mature readers.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2007

    The South in their terms

    Mark Twain is pure genius in this novel of a mere slave wanting freedom and a poor boy wanting to live on his own terms. The book stars Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. As Jim wants to get back to his family both he and Huck go on multiple adventures both exciting and dangerous. Some of which include false identities and immodest plays.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2007

    Huck Finn, not the greatest adventure.

    This great book is about a young boy that is very crazy, his name is Huckleberry Finn. He isn¿t like most kids today because he really likes the outdoors. He doesn¿t like to be inside the house, and he¿d rather go out hiking in the woods than sitting in the house and watching TV. He has a very cruel dad that never allows him to leave the house, and takes all of Huck¿s money. One day he ends up running away from his dad¿s house, and goes on a very long adventure. He finds many people. Some end up being his friend, and others are just there for their own convenience and lie about everything. He ends up having to go back to his old lifestyle and is somewhat happy that he got a life lasting adventure! This book is very fun for people that have the patience to go through and read every word carefully, because you get confused very easily. It has a great accent, but sometimes it¿s just a little too much. I didn¿t really think that the author Mark Twain had much of a message to this story, except for one that wasn¿t really a message but it¿s as close as I can get, and that is to go for what you want, and don¿t let anybody hold you back! And that¿s also what I learned about this book! But the greatest thing in this book is that he never gives up, and really fights for what he wants! He always goes for what he believes in, and doesn¿t care for anyone else!

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2007

    Huckleberry Finn, ummm not as good as Tom Sawyer

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Huckleberry Finn isn¿t really the best book I have ever read , but it is interesting in an adventurous sort of way. Huckleberry Finn is a young boy who is best friends with Tom Sawyer. Huck and Tom are quite rascally little boys. They create a gang, steal, sneak around, and do many other adventurous things. Huck doesn¿t really have a home. His dad is an alcoholic and he steals Huck¿s money. Also he won¿t let Huck go to school. Huck lives with a very clean, uptight family for a while and then gets tired of wearing all the tight nice clothes so he runs away. He ends up in a big problem where he has to be very brave, but he figures everything out and goes back to his old lifestyle. Huck is happy living with the pigs and running around all day with Tom. I think that there are many things that you can learn about people by reading this, but also if you¿re not up for reading parts over and over then don¿t read Huckleberry Finn. Many parts of the book you may not understand because of the dialogue that Mark Twain uses. Mark Twain also wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. In my opinion Tom Sawyer is a better example of Mark Twain¿s abilities as an author. This book is more for the older reader as well. Some of the language may be inappropriate for younger people too, but it is just how they talked back then. Huckleberry Finn was okay, but not the best book I have ever read. If you want a good read then you should go for Tom Sawyer. Huckleberry Finn is more entertaining if you have nothing to do. ¿Well there is nothing more to write about Huck and his adventures¿ - Huck

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2007

    NOT THAT SERIOUS

    This book is definitely nothing special.Everyone makes a big deal about this book but it is average. There are many other books that are wayyyyyy better!!!!if you dont read this book...life goes own..your not missing anything. Save your time and read a better book

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2006

    A Very Intersting Classic Novel!

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is a very interesting classic novel. The novel¿s main character, Huck Finn, runs away from home and finds a runaway slave called Jim. Huck and Jim become friends and decide to run away together. They have many adventures and see the different types of people in America. They come across some obstacles but they overcome them together. Most importantly, they learn new things and have some fun. I really enjoyed reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn because it showed the unanimity between two people from different racial backgrounds. The characters were realistic and each had an interesting personality. The book had some sentences and phrases that were difficult to understand at first but I was able to understand their meanings after rereading them. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is one of the best books I have ever read (and that¿s a lot of books). I would recommend it to anybody who likes classics. This book can also be read by anyone who likes mischief and adventure because this book contains a lot of those and more. If you read it, hope you¿ll enjoy it as much as I did.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2006

    Freedom and Friendship

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is nothing short of a great classic. Mark Twain¿s novel proves to be a novel full of adventure, maturity, and growth. Through Huck¿s journey down the Mississippi River, the author illustrates that often times, a person can¿t see the essence of someone until he or she gets close enough to share lives with that person. Huckleberry Finn, the main character and protagonist in the story, sets of on a journey to escape not only the wrath of his drunken and abusive father but also the clutches of American civilization. Huck is a paradigm of someone who has an awakening during his journey down the Mississippi River. Throughout the entire novel he continues to change and mold into a better person. For example, Huck says, ¿It made me feel so mean I could almost kissed his foot to get him to take it back. It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger, but I done it, and I warn¿t ever sorry for it afterward, neither¿ (Twain 90). Huck no longer sees the Jim as only a slave, but he sees him as a real friend and more importantly a true friend. In fact, Jim is the major reason for Huck maturity. Several times throughout the book Huck contemplates turning Jim in for running away however, he decides not to because he has built a special friendship with him. Twain uses metaphors to describe the river that proves to an important element in the novel. For example, he writes that one part of the river had ¿a cut bank with smoky ghosts of big trees on it¿ (Twain 86). The Mississippi River symbolizes Huck¿s journey from repressed civilization to a new life of freedom. When he begins his journey, he is only a young boy who is dependent on what others think. After he, musters up enough courage to leave his father and embarks on his travels, Huck grows not physically but mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. He becomes more mature and much more independent. Through Twain¿s inclusion of the people and adventures Huck encounters, the reader is able to see the process of Huck¿s growth. Huck¿s continued struggle for freedom and more distance from civilization can be seen when he says ¿But I reckon I got to light out for the territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she¿s going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can¿t stand it. I been there before¿ (Twain 283). Another thing that made this novel great was Twain¿s use of irony. Throughout the whole novel everyone thinks that Huck is dead however, we, as readers know that he is not dead, but he actually faked his death and staged the crime scene. Another example of Twain¿s use of irony is the fact that Huck and Jim are traveling down the Mississippi River and deeper into slave territory when they are trying to gain Jim his freedom. I enjoyed this book very much, and I hope you will too.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2006

    Huck Finn is a masterpiece

    Wolfgang doesn't know what he is talking about.Huck Finn is clearly a great novel.It shows truth and life lessons.The reason why its so hard to understand because Twain wrote the way Jim talked.It showed the way a uneducated slave probably would have spoke.It has good morals and lessons.Its not racist either.Its truth!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2006

    amazing...

    We read this in my english class and i was excited from the start...i simply fell in love with the book. Twain did a great job placing you in society of that time and bringing up the issues of then and issues we still face now... it was simply amazing

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2005

    great novel, except for the third act

    everyone who uses the hemingway quote should finish it, where old ernest said you have to quit reading when tom sawyer comes back into the story, because the rest is cheating. 100 pages! the story reaches its natrual, moral, artistic and thematic climax, and the only thing left is for huck to free jim and light out for the Territory--and what does twain do? He drags tom sawyer back into the story, and everything falls apart. and that's the great american novel? no. parts of it are beautiful and the best, like hemingway said, but the ending, twain's overuse of the theme of death and rebrith, and many other artistic faults, which we don't have time to get into, make it a manuscript about twenty drafts and two years from completion.

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