Adventures of Pinocchio

( 8 )

Overview

A timeless tale of adventure, heart, mischief, and family, Pinocchio is one of the most renowned children's books of all time. Since its publication in 1881, there have been countless editions of the book. Unlike these editions, most of which feature the work of a single artist, this Classic Illustrated Edition brings together Carlo Collodi's original story and a wondrous collection of illustrations from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This extraordinary gallery of images includes the work of ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 17 (2 pages)
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(25467)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Good
Giving great service since 2004: Buy from the Best! 4,000,000 items shipped to delighted customers. We have 1,000,000 unique items ready to ship! Find your Great Buy today!

Ships from: Toledo, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(2477)

Condition: Acceptable
Biggest little used bookstore in the world.

Ships from: Reno, NV

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(3879)

Condition: Acceptable
Free State Books. Never settle for less.

Ships from: Halethorpe, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(3853)

Condition: Good

Ships from: Toledo, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(7456)

Condition: Good
Light shelving wear with minimal damage to cover and bindings. Pages show minor use. Help save a tree. Buy all your used books from Green Earth Books. Read. Recycle and Reuse.

Ships from: Portland, OR

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(552)

Condition: Good
Mussino, Attilio 1989 Hard cover American ed. Good. Go green, recycle! Book may have wear from reading, may contain some library markings. Text in English, Italian. Sewn ... binding. Paper over boards. Intended for a juvenile audience. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Phoenix, AZ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(1150)

Condition: Good
Good book, great price! We ship daily via USPS. Buy with the best! BN

Ships from: Toledo, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(9739)

Condition: Very Good
Book has appearance of light use with no easily noticeable wear. Millions of satisfied customers and climbing. Thriftbooks is the name you can trust, guaranteed. Spend Less. Read ... More. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Auburn, WA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$8.00
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(776)

Condition: Very Good
1989 Hardcover Very Good jacket Very Good. Lightly used with NO markings in text. Pasadena's finest independent new and used bookstore.

Ships from: Pasadena, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$9.95
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(134)

Condition: Very Good
Mussino, Attilio New York, New York, U.S.A. 1989 Cloth Hardback First Thus Very Good 0027228215 Oversized 310pp Fantastic color illustrations Corners of cover and spine tips are ... rubbed and very faint scuff mark on half-title page near top edge, otherwise book is AS NEW. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Coeur D Alene, ID

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 17 (2 pages)
Close
Sort by
Adventures of Pinocchio (Illustrated)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$1.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

A timeless tale of adventure, heart, mischief, and family, Pinocchio is one of the most renowned children's books of all time. Since its publication in 1881, there have been countless editions of the book. Unlike these editions, most of which feature the work of a single artist, this Classic Illustrated Edition brings together Carlo Collodi's original story and a wondrous collection of illustrations from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This extraordinary gallery of images includes the work of Enrico Mazzanti, Carlo Chiostri, Attilio Mussino, Frederick Richarson, and Charles Folkard, making Pinocchio's fantastic encounters and tender moments a truly magical trip that will appeal to book lovers of all ages.

A retelling of the adventures of Pinocchio, a mischievous wooden puppet, who wants more than anything else to become a real boy. Illustrated notes throughout the text explain the historical background of the story.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Two illustrated volumes of Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio take the spotlight this fall. Robert Ingpen's edition starts on a note of humor, with inset illustrations showcasing his meticulous ink lines and cross-hatching. He depicts the newly emerging Marionette wearing Geppetto's wig, for instance, or a full-page image of Geppetto fitting the fellow with new feet after the puppet's burn in a fire. A wordless spread of the Assassins making off with Pinocchio, however, exudes an appropriate creepiness. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
If the only image of the wooden boy that children have is the Disney puppet with his shock of black hair lovingly crafted by the gentle old Geppetto, then perhaps it is time to introduce them to the original. Not sanitized by Disney, this Pinocchio is revealed as sometimes arrogant, often naughty, very disobedient, but with an underlying desire to do what is right. There are plenty of adventures and misadventures for the wooden puppet who longs to be a boy. It is a cautionary tale, unabashed in its messages to children, that probably works best as a read aloud. What sets this edition apart from others is the handsome design. From the rich buff pages to the exquisite paintings of 19th century Italy, this is a work of art. Here is a classic that belongs on every bookshelf. 2005, Creative Editions, Ages 5 up.
—Beverley Fahey
Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
A veteran children's writer retells the story of Pinocchio and presents it as a thirteen scene play. He likens the metamorphosis of Pinocchio as the growth in character of all of us, and HE encourages readers to present it as a play to illustrate this fact. Pinocchio has not lost his timelessness and appeal, and this story is an opportunity for a group of children to explore his complex character in a more extended version.
Children's Literature - Elizabeth Fronk
Once upon a time, a block of wood became the puppet known as Pinocchio. While one may recognize book's title and its characters, this translation tells a much darker story than what readers may expect. Here, Pinocchio runs away and kills the talking cricket! On his way to school, he meets a dishonorable fox and cat, and they try to murder Pinocchio! Fortunately, the Blue Fairy comes to his aid. She tries to guide him and suggests he be more obedient. In spite of this advice, Pinocchio joins his schoolmate Lampwick in Play Land. There, the puppet turns into a donkey. When he is thrown into the sea, he changes back into a puppet and reunites with his father. Only then does he begin to realize how he can become a real boy by helping his father. Many readers are familiar with the general arc of Pinocchio's story, but this translation bluntly recounts specific, harsh events. Beautiful watercolor and black-and-white illustrations accompany—and perhaps soften—the story. Unfortunately, these illustrations do not follow the story precisely; the discrepancies could be distracting. This fantasy could appeal to middle and high school readers who can tolerate the puppet's obstinacy and not be distracted by the illustrations' placement. Reviewer: Elizabeth Fronk
School Library Journal
Gr 2-7-The classic moral tale of the wayward puppet's quest to become a real boy is illustrated with Ingpen's richly textured pencil-and-watercolor artwork. A combination of full-page illustration and spreads, as well as numerous smaller pictures, depicts Pinocchio's adventures. Ingpen's color choices-primarily subdued neutral tones accented with bright hues-underscore the sense of play in a rather grim story. The bright-eyed marionette is portrayed as more mischievous than malicious-more naive than nasty. Even as a puppet, his posture and movements are that of an active, curious child. Likewise, the narration is lively and energetic and seasoned with subtle humor. The dark sides of the tale are not omitted, but the focus is on the adventure and on Pinocchio's redemption. Some of the modernization is unnecessary and awkward; for example, the Cat receives a telegram, rather than message, informing him that his child is ill. Overall, this is a handsome traditional edition of the story that will appeal to children. The Adventures of Pinocchio illustrated by Robert Innocenti (Creative Editions, 2005) is a more literary version with a stronger sense of the European setting, dramatic tension, and moral undertones. Sara Fanelli's version (Candlewick, 2003) offers a more contemporary collage-style interpretation.-Heide Piehler, Shorewood Public Library, WI Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Janice Del Negro
ger for reading aloud. The "true" story of the puppet who wanted to be a real boy will surprise those familiar with the popular Disney version. This abridged Pinocchio includes plot details missing from the animated film, more violence, and the blue fairy as a central character. The didacticism of the original is retained, but Mattotti's colorful paintings have enough style and dramatic impact to carry the reader to the final foregone conclusion. A good additional title for large comparative literature collections, this should provide a bridge for those who want the "real" story but are unable to tackle the original novel-length tale.
Kirkus Reviews
What most readers know of Pinocchio is a wooden puppet whose nose grows from telling lies. This episode—longer than a picture book but shorter than the original tale—is one small chapter in the exploits and adventures of Pinocchio, the boy wannabe. An illustrated adaptation, it follows the original M.A. Murray translation closely, yet succeeds without the long-windedness of the 1892 classic, and with all the rich language, spirited characters, and lively escapades intact. Inspired by the commedia dell'arte, the Italian traveling street theater of Collodi's time, Young (Night Visitors, 1995, etc.) has created scenes that authentically capture the playlike quality of the story. Reminiscent of his colorful cut-paper collage in Seven Blind Mice (1993), the array of characters and images cleverly reflect a stage production, complete with double-page spreads that act as scenery backdrops. It's an energetic rendition that invites the audience to meet again the mischievous puppet with all his foibles, setting the stage for an Oz-like ending that reaffirms the power of good.
From the Publisher
American Library Association Booklist
In many of the watercolors, versions of familiar Renaissance paintings which echo the action of the story are subtly tucked into the scene. A well designed, brilliantly illustrated, new edition of the classic.

Times Educational Supplement
Simply Read Books’  The Adventures of Pinocchio is one of the most handsome books in recent years. Ghiuselev pictures a wholly convincing world. The Fairy with Blue Hair is in iconic descent from Madonnas by Piero della Francesca, and adds psychological depth to Ghiuselev’s interpretation. The final painting, in which the Blue Fairy gives life to Pinocchio, is surely one of the most original and beautiful transformation scenes in children’s illustrated literature.

New York Times Book Review
Magnificent full-collor paintings and drawings in a jaw-droppingly beautiful oversized edition.

Book Trust Foundation
Ghiuselev has added a tremendous atmospheric effect to the story. The artwork is expressive and poetic. The illustrations break out from their framework to give body and substance to the characters and objects featured on each page and the end papers are reminiscent of those created by famous master printers many centuries ago. It is a pleasure going through the pages and savouring each of the many captivating illustrations. This is the perfect gift book for Christmas and a collector’s item in its own right.

Locus
This is a book to treasure, both for its illustrations and sheer, loving book craft. Simply first rate.

The Midwest Book Review
A treasure of a book and a gift to be remembered.

The Vancouver Sun
This book should bring pleasure to readers young and old for years to come. Go out and buy two copies - one for yourself and one for someone you love.

The Georgia Straight
A must buy.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780027228212
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/30/1989
  • Series: Roberto Innocenti Ser.
  • Edition description: 1st American ed
  • Pages: 280
  • Age range: 8 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.87 (w) x 8.83 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author


Carlo Collodi (the pen name of Carlo Lorenzini) was born in Florence in 1826. His parents were servants and the family was extremely poor, but Carlo was fortunate to have his education paid for by a wealthy aristocrat and became a successful author and translator. He published several novels and satirical works as well as popular translations of many traditional fairy tales. He died in 1890, unaware of the lasting legacy of his most famous work, The Adventures of Pinocchio.
 
Illustrator Robert Ingpen studied illustration and book design at The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. In 1986 he received the Hans Christian Andersen Award for his contribution to children's literature, and he was honored with the Membership of the Order of Australia. He lives in Barwon Heads, Australia.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter I
 
How it came to pass that Master Cherry the carpenter found a piece of wood that laughed and cried like a child
 
There was once upon a time
 
 
“A king!” my little readers will instantly exclaim.
No, children, you are wrong. There was once upon a time a piece of wood.
This wood was not valuable: it was only a common log like those that are burnt in winter in the stoves and fireplaces to make a cheerful blaze and warm the rooms.
I cannot say how it came about, but the fact is that one fine day this piece of wood was lying in the shop of an old carpenter of the name of Master Antonio. He was, however, called by everybody Master Cherry, on account of the end of his nose, which was always as red and polished as a ripe cherry.
No sooner had Master Cherry set eyes on the piece of wood than his face beamed with delight; and, rubbing his hands together with satisfaction, he said softly to himself:
“This wood has come at the right moment; it will just do to make the leg of a little table.”
Having said this he immediately took a sharp ax with which to remove the bark and the rough surface. Just, however, as he was going to give the first stroke, he remained with his arm suspended in the air, for he heard a very small voice saying imploringly, “Do not strike me so hard!”
Picture to yourselves the astonishment of good old Master Cherry!
He turned his terrified eyes all round the room to try and discover where the little voice could possibly have come from, but he saw nobody! He looked under the bench—nobody; he looked into a cupboardthat was always shut—nobody; he looked into a basket of shavings and sawdust—nobody; he even opened the door of the shop and gave a glance into the street—and still nobody. Who, then, could it be?
“I see how it is,” he said, laughing and scratching his wig. “Evidently that little voice was all my imagination. Let us set to work again.”
And taking up the ax, he struck a tremendous blow on the piece of wood.
“Oh! Oh! You have hurt me!” cried the same little voice dolefully.
This time Master Cherry was petrified. His eyes started out of his head with fright, his mouth remained open, and his tongue hung out almost to the end of his chin, like a mask on a fountain. As soon as he had recovered the use of his speech, he began to say, stuttering and trembling with fear.
“But where on earth can that little voice have come from that said Oh! Oh!? Here there is certainly no living soul. Is it possible that this piece of wood can have learnt to cry and to lament like a child? I cannot believe it. This piece of wood, here it is; a log for fuel like all the others, and thrown on the fire it would about suffice to boil a saucepan of beans…How then? Can anyone be hidden inside it? If anyone is hidden inside, so much, the worse for him. I will settle him at once.”
So saying, he seized the poor piece of wood and commenced beating it without mercy against the walls of the room.
Then he stopped to listen if he could hear any little voice lamenting. He waited two minutes—nothing; five minutes—nothing; ten minutes—still nothing!
“I see how it is,” he then said, forcing himself to laugh and pushing up his wig. “Evidently the little voice that said Oh! Oh! was all my imagination! Let us set to work again.”
Nevertheless, he was very frightened, so he tried to sing to give himself a little courage.
Putting the ax aside, he took his plane, to plane and polish the bit of wood; but while he was running it up and down he heard the same little voice say laughing:
“Have done! You are tickling me all over!”
This time poor Master Cherry fell down as if he had been struck by lightning. When he at last opened his eyes he found himself seated on the floor.
His face was quite changed; even the end of his nose, instead of being crimson, as it was nearly always, had become blue from fright.
 
Illustrations © 2002 by Gris Grimly

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


1 How it happened that Master Cherry, a carpenter, found a piece of wood that cried and laughed like a little boy 3
2 Master Cherry gives the piece of wood to his friend Geppetto, who wants to make it into an amazing puppet that can dance and fence and do flips 6
3 Back home, Geppetto immediately begins work on his puppet, which he names Pinocchio. The puppet's first pranks 9
4 The story of Pinocchio and the Talking Cricket, which shows that naughty children can't stand to be corrected by those who know best 13
5 Pinocchio gets hungry and finds an egg to make an omelet with, but at the last second the omelet flies away, out the window 16
6 Pinocchio falls asleep with his feet propped on the brazier, and the next morning he finds that his feet have burnt off 19
7 Poor Geppetto comes home and gives the puppet the breakfast he had brought for himself 21
8 Geppetto makes Pinocchio a new pair of feet and sells his own coat to buy him a spelling book 24
9 Pinocchio sells his spelling book in order to go see the Great Puppet Show 27
10 The puppets recognize Pinocchio as their brother and welcome him raucously; but when the puppet master shows up, Pinocchio is in danger of meeting a tragic end 30
11 Fire-Eater sneezes and forgives Pinocchio, who then saves his friend Harlequin from death 33
12 Fire-Eater gives Pinocchio five gold pieces to take to his father, Geppetto. But Pinocchio is duped by the Fox and the Cat and goes off with them instead 36
13 The Red Crayfish Inn 41
14 Because he ignored the Talking Cricket's good advice, Pinocchio runs into murderers 45
15 The murderers chase Pinocchio, and when they catch him they hang him from a branch of theBig Oak 49
16 The Beautiful Girl with Sky-Blue Hair has the puppet taken down. She puts him to bed, and calls in three doctors to learn if he's alive or dead 52
17 Pinocchio eats the sugar, but won't take the purgative until he sees the gravediggers coming to carry him away. Then he tells a lie and, as punishment, his nose grows longer 56
18 Pinocchio again encounters the Fox and the Cat and goes with them to plant his four coins in the Field of Miracles 61
19 Pinocchio is robbed of his gold coins and, as punishment, gets four months in jail 66
20 Freed from jail, he tries to return to the Fairy's house, but along the way he encounters a terrible Serpent, and after that he gets caught in a snare 70
21 Pinocchio is seized by a farmer and made to serve as a watchdog outside a henhouse 73
22 Pinocchio thwarts the thieves and as a reward for being faithful is granted his liberty 76
23 Pinocchio mourns the death of the Beautiful Girl with Sky-Blue Hair. Then he meets a Pigeon who carries him to the sea, where he dives into the water to try to rescue Geppetto 79
24 Pinocchio reaches Busy-Bee Island and finds the Fairy with Sky-Blue Hair again 84
25 Pinocchio promises the Fairy that he'll be good and to study, because he's tired of being a puppet and wants to become a good boy 90
26 Pinocchio goes to the seashore with his schoolmates to see the terrible Shark 93
27 A great fight between Pinocchio and his schoolmates; one gets wounded, and the police arrest Pinocchio 96
28 Pinocchio is in danger of being fried up in a skillet, like a fish 102
29 Pinocchio returns to the house of the Fairy, who promises him that the next day he will cease to be a puppet and become a boy, A big breakfast is planned to celebrate this great event 107
30 Instead of becoming a boy, Pinocchio sneaks off with his friend Lampwick to Toyland 114
31 After five months of nonstop fun, Pinocchio wakes up one morning to a rather nasty surprise 119
32 Pinocchio is amazed to discover a fine pair of donkey ears sprouting from his head. He turns into a donkey, tail and all, and begins to bray 125
33 Now a real donkey, Pinocchio is taken to market and sold to the Ringmaster of a circus, who wants to teach him to dance and jump through hoops. But one evening he becomes lame and so is sold to another man who wants to make a drum out of his hide 131
34 Thrown into the sea, Pinocchio is eaten by fish and becomes a puppet again. But as he is swimming to safety, he is swallowed up by the terrible Shark 139
35 Inside the Shark's belly, Pinocchio is reunited with - with whom? Read this chapter to find out 146
36 At last Pinocchio ceases to be a puppet and becomes a boy 151
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2007

    A reviewer

    Parents, if you ever wanted to teach your kids not to lie, this is the book to read to them. If you can convince your children that their nose will grow to an embarrassing length if they lie, and it works, then do it since they'll thank you years later. Also, like Pinocchio, if your child has a dream, tell them that unless they are true to themselves, as in the story, it will never come true.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2013

    AMAZING!!

    I red this book twice and I love it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 23, 2012

    Beautiful

    This is a beautifully illustrated edition of the classic story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 29, 2011

    i love it

    its realy good

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 8 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)