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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his famous detective and illustrated by Sidney Paget.

These are the first of the Sherlock Holmes short stories, originally published as single stories in the Strand ...
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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

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Overview

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, featuring his famous detective and illustrated by Sidney Paget.

These are the first of the Sherlock Holmes short stories, originally published as single stories in the Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. The book was published in England on 14 October 1892 by George Newnes Ltd and in a US Edition on 15 October by Harper. The initial combined print run was 14,500 copies.

The 12 stories in this collection are:

"A Scandal in Bohemia"
"The Adventure of the Red-Headed League"
"A Case of Identity"
"The Boscombe Valley Mystery"
"The Five Orange Pips"
"The Man with the Twisted Lip"
"The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle"
"The Adventure of the Speckled Band"
"The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb"
"The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor"
"The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet"
"The Adventure of the Copper Beeches"

The book was banned in the Soviet Union in 1929 for the occultism of its author, although the book shows few to no signs of such material. Later, the embargo was lifted.

In "A Scandal in Bohemia", while the currently married Dr. Watson is paying Holmes a visit, Holmes is called upon by a masked gentleman introducing himself as Count Von Kramm, an agent for a wealthy client. However, Holmes quickly deduces that he is in fact Wilhelm Gottsreich Sigismond von Ormstein, Grand Duke of Cassel-Felstein and the hereditary King of Bohemia. The King admits this, tearing off his mask.

In "The Adventure of the Red-Headed League", Jabez Wilson, a London pawnbroker, comes to consult Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson. While studying his client, both Holmes and Watson notice his red hair, which has a distinct flame-like hue. Wilson tells them that some weeks before his young assistant, Vincent Spaulding, urged him to respond to a newspaper want-ad offering work to only red-headed male applicants. The next morning, Wilson had waited in a long line of fellow red-headed men, was interviewed and was the only applicant hired, because none of the other applicants qualified; their red hair was either too dark or too bright, and did not match Wilson's unique flame color.

In "A Case of Identity", The story revolves around the case of Miss Mary Sutherland, a woman with a substantial income from the interest on a fund set up for her. She is engaged to a quiet Londoner who has recently disappeared. Sherlock Holmes's detective powers are barely challenged as this turns out to be quite an elementary case for him, much as it puzzles Watson.

In "The Boscombe Valley Mystery", Lestrade summons Holmes to a community in Herefordshire, where a local landowner has been murdered outdoors. The deceased's estranged son is strongly implicated. Holmes quickly determines that a mysterious third man may be responsible for the crime, unraveling a thread involving a secret criminal past, thwarted love, and blackmail.

In "The Five Orange Pips", A young Sussex gentleman named John Openshaw has a strange story: in 1869 his uncle Elias Openshaw had suddenly come back to England to settle on an estate at Horsham, West Sussex after living for years in the United States as a planter in Florida and serving as a Colonel in the Confederate Army.

In "In the Man with the Twisted Lip", Dr Watson is called upon late at night by a female friend of his wife. Her husband has been absent for several days and, as he is an opium addict, she is sure he has been indulging in a lengthy drug binge in a dangerous East End opium den. Frantic with worry, she seeks Dr. Watson's help in fetching him home. Watson does this, but he also finds his friend Sherlock Holmes in the den, disguised as an old man, trying to extract information about a new case from the addicts in the den.

In "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle", Watson visits his friend Holmes at Christmas time and finds him contemplating a battered old hat, brought to him by the commissionaire Peterson after it and a Christmas goose had been dropped by a man in a scuffle with some street ruffians. Peterson takes the goose home to eat it, but comes back later with a carbuncle. His wife has found it in the bird's crop (stomach). Holmes makes some interesting deductions concerning the owner of the hat from simple observations of its condition, conclusions amply confirmed when an advertisement for the owner produces the man himself: Henry Baker.

In "The Adventures of the Speckled Band", A young woman named Helen Stoner consults the detective Sherlock Holmes about the suspicious death of her sister, Julia. One night, after conversing with her twin sister about her upcoming wedding day, Julia screamed and came to the hallway where Helen came out to see her, in Julia's dying words she said "it was the band, the speckled band!"
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016615554
  • Publisher: Balefire Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/13/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • File size: 529 KB

Meet the Author

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish physician and writer, most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, generally considered a milestone in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels.

Conan Doyle was involved in the campaign for the reform of the Congo Free State, led by journalist E. D. Morel and diplomat Roger Casement. During 1909 he wrote The Crime of the Congo, a long pamphlet in which he denounced the horrors in that country. He became acquainted with Morel and Casement, and it is possible that, together with Bertram Fletcher Robinson, they inspired several characters in the 1912 novel The Lost World.

In 1882 he joined former classmate George Turnavine Budd as his partner at a medical practice in Plymouth, but their relationship proved difficult, and Conan Doyle soon left to set up an independent practice. Arriving in Portsmouth in June of that year with less than £10 (£700 today) to his name, he set up a medical practice at 1 Bush Villas in Elm Grove, Southsea. The practice was initially not very successful. While waiting for patients, Conan Doyle began writing stories and composed his first novels, The Mystery of Cloomber, not published until 1888, and the unfinished Narrative of John Smith, which would go unpublished until 2011. He amassed a portfolio of short stories including "The Captain of the Pole-Star" and "J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement", both inspired by Doyle's time at sea.

Doyle struggled to find a publisher for his work. His first significant piece, A Study in Scarlet, was taken by Ward Lock & Co on 20 November 1886, giving Doyle £25 for all rights to the story. The piece appeared later that year in the Beeton's Christmas Annual and received good reviews in The Scotsman and the Glasgow Herald. The story featured the first appearance of Watson and Sherlock Holmes, partially modeled after his former university teacher Joseph Bell. Conan Doyle wrote to him, "It is most certainly to you that I owe Sherlock Holmes. Round the center of deduction and inference and observation which I have heard you inculcate I have tried to build up a man."
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 688 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(318)

4 Star

(131)

3 Star

(78)

2 Star

(52)

1 Star

(109)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 690 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 22, 2011

    Needs editing

    This book was obviously scanned from a book and then posted here. Many characters were not translated correctly and thus it is very difficult to read. I guess you get what you pay for! I would not recommend downloading this book even though it is free unless you e6j0y rea6ing teXt in th15 fo4ma+.

    61 out of 73 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2011

    Disgusting.

    This book is simply unreadable. There is no attempt at typographical consistency or formatting. I am tempted to ask Customer Service how to delete this piece of garbage, and I regret that I cannot give this ebook zero stars. It is a download only diehard Holmes fans without any money to spare should even consider purchasing.

    31 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 31, 2010

    Poor Quality

    Great book, but the copy quality was so poor it wasn't possible to read.

    26 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2012

    Hard to understand

    The pages are all mixed up and hard to understand about the book that way if you want to read then buy one for better quality DO NOT GET THE FREE ONE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    20 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Poor quality

    THis book is almost impossible to read. Lots of mistakes when it was scanned in.

    17 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2012

    Beware the freebies!

    Many, MANY of the free copies of public domain books available on the Nook are disappointingly unreadable. They either start in the middle of the novel, are written only half in English, or have rampant symbols and punctuation in the middle of words, or all three. The fact that there are anywhere from 3 to 15 copies or more of these free books just makes it harder to wade through the multiple copies to find one that may be readable. Having heard better reviews from Kindle readers, I have to sadly say I am starting to regret my decision to go with the Nook. I would feel a whole lot better about my purchase if I thought any of these problems were being addressed.

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2012

    It's too hard to read past the typos Very hard too read past the typos

    Because of all the typos in this scan of the book, it is very hard to read it.

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2007

    I love Watson!

    This book consists of several bite-sized nuggets of mystery, each of the tales being 20-25 pps long. Holmes usually has the answer to the case before he hears the end of the story, and Watson always tries to be as perceptive as Holmes, but fails. However, we need Watson because he is the narrator! I can't decide which was scarier: The Speckled Band or The Engineer's Thumb. Gripping! I am glad to have finally discovered Watson and Holmes!

    8 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2012

    Bad edition

    While these stories are classics, find another edition to read. This one is very badly scanned, and most words are unrecognizable.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 31, 2012

    The book full of Mysteries

    The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, written by Conan Doyle, is a series of short stories about cases Holmes and his sidekick Dr. Watson have solved. Sherlock Holmes is an observant man and his intuition is unmatched by anyone in Europe. Dr.Watson is Holmes's sidekick in this book, trying to solve difficult cases applying Holmes's techniques. In this short story, the people that need a case to be solved are the Baskervilles. In the past, there was a man named Hugo that was obsessed with a young girl, and eventually kidnapped her and molested her. She escaped with the help of an ivy covered wall. Hugo supposedly made a deal with the devil in order to find the girl. Later Hugo's companions found his body next to the girl's with his throat ripped open by a big black beast. Mortimer, the family doctor, reports that the supernatural beast haunts the family.

    I enjoyed reading this book, but I somewhat dislike it just because some of the things Conan Doyle writes can get confusing. Whenever Holmes is on a case, he observes every detail and listens to everything a person has to say. This shows his intelligence and his determination to show this intelligence to the people around him. Dr.Watson admires Holmes's skills and tries to apply them to what he does to contribute to solve a case. This supports the fact that Holmes is person people look up to. The supernatural hound is symbolism for truth and fantasy; Sir Charles Baskerville was the man that was afraid of the curse. The fact that Sir Charles had poor health supports the fact that he was scared to death by the "hound." I would recommend this book to people of all shapes and sizes. The book makes you think; The mysteries makes the book suspenseful, but Holmes solves these cases with unmatched logic.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    Good stories, lots of errors

    I absolutely LOVE Sherlock Holmes but this version has lots of scan errors. To people interested in these stories, I would suggest finding a different version. It would be worth a few dollars extra.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2011

    No read

    I can't read this book. I thaught a free book would be good, but I was wrong. All the chapters are called: Hosted By Google.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2002

    You must read this book

    This must be one of the best books I have ever read in all my life. Sherlock is unbeliveable in the way that he solves his cases. He is like a more adult version of Scooby Doo.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2001

    agreatbook

    great book edge of your seat

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2000

    Brill

    This book is a mix up of lots of stories. It is a wonderfull book to read on the go as the stories are relitively short and if you get bored with one you can move onto the next!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2011

    Great book

    This is the best book ever

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2012

    Hi

    Lots of growing and shrinking
    Fantasy
    But all in all a good book

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Review

    A series of short stories that are quite entertaining even though Arthur Conan Doyle's writing style is somewhat dated.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2012

    Terrible scan

    Impossible to read, full of gibberish.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2012

    Xdree

    Wierd

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 690 Customer Reviews

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