The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Take a lighthearted, nostalgic trip to a simpler time, seen through the eyes of a very special boy named Tom Sawyer. It is a dreamlike summertime world of hooky and adventure, pranks and punishment, villains and young love, filled with memorable characters. Adults and young readers alike continue to enjoy this delightful classic of the promise and dreams of youth from one of ...

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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Overview

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Take a lighthearted, nostalgic trip to a simpler time, seen through the eyes of a very special boy named Tom Sawyer. It is a dreamlike summertime world of hooky and adventure, pranks and punishment, villains and young love, filled with memorable characters. Adults and young readers alike continue to enjoy this delightful classic of the promise and dreams of youth from one of America’s most beloved authors.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

He has no mother, his father is a brutal drunkard, and he sleeps in a barrel. He’s Huck Finn—liar, sometime thief, and rebel against respectability. But when Huck meets a runaway slave named Jim, his life changes forever. On their exciting flight down the Mississippi aboard a raft, the boy nobody wanted matures into a young man of courage and conviction. As Ernest Hemingway said of this glorious novel: “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn.

With a New Introduction

@declineofwesternsiv Seems like soon as a fella comes into a bit o’ money, everyone comes out of the woodworks after’n it.

These ladies wants to sivilize me? More like reverse gold-dig my fame and fortune. @FencinTom: Get me outta here!

From Twitterature: The World's Greatest Books in Twenty Tweets or Less

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451528643
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/19/2002
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: REISSUE
  • Pages: 544
  • Product dimensions: 6.72 (w) x 10.92 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri, in 1835, and died at Redding, Connecticut in 1910. In his person and in his pursuits he was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimental—and also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called “the Lincoln of our literature.”

Biography

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens on November 30, 1835, in Florida, Missouri; his family moved to the port town of Hannibal four years later. His father, an unsuccessful farmer, died when Twain was eleven. Soon afterward the boy began working as an apprentice printer, and by age sixteen he was writing newspaper sketches. He left Hannibal at eighteen to work as an itinerant printer in New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and Cincinnati. From 1857 to 1861 he worked on Mississippi steamboats, advancing from cub pilot to licensed pilot.

After river shipping was interrupted by the Civil War, Twain headed west with his brother Orion, who had been appointed secretary to the Nevada Territory. Settling in Carson City, he tried his luck at prospecting and wrote humorous pieces for a range of newspapers. Around this time he first began using the pseudonym Mark Twain, derived from a riverboat term. Relocating to San Francisco, he became a regular newspaper correspondent and a contributor to the literary magazine the Golden Era. He made a five-month journey to Hawaii in 1866 and the following year traveled to Europe to report on the first organized tourist cruise. The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and Other Sketches (1867) consolidated his growing reputation as humorist and lecturer.

After his marriage to Livy Langdon, Twain settled first in Buffalo, New York, and then for two decades in Hartford, Connecticut. His European sketches were expanded into The Innocents Abroad (1869), followed by Roughing It (1872), an account of his Western adventures; both were enormously successful. Twain's literary triumphs were offset by often ill-advised business dealings (he sank thousands of dollars, for instance, in a failed attempt to develop a new kind of typesetting machine, and thousands more into his own ultimately unsuccessful publishing house) and unrestrained spending that left him in frequent financial difficulty, a pattern that was to persist throughout his life.

Following The Gilded Age (1873), written in collaboration with Charles Dudley Warner, Twain began a literary exploration of his childhood memories of the Mississippi, resulting in a trio of masterpieces --The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Life on the Mississippi (1883), and finally The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), on which he had been working for nearly a decade. Another vein, of historical romance, found expression in The Prince and the Pauper (1882), the satirical A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889), and Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896), while he continued to draw on his travel experiences in A Tramp Abroad (1880) and Following the Equator (1897). His close associates in these years included William Dean Howells, Bret Harte, and George Washington Cable, as well as the dying Ulysses S. Grant, whom Twain encouraged to complete his memoirs, published by Twain's publishing company in 1885.

For most of the 1890s Twain lived in Europe, as his life took a darker turn with the death of his daughter Susy in 1896 and the worsening illness of his daughter Jean. The tone of Twain's writing also turned progressively more bitter. The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson (1894), a detective story hinging on the consequences of slavery, was followed by powerful anti-imperialist and anticolonial statements such as 'To the Person Sitting in Darkness' (1901), 'The War Prayer' (1905), and 'King Leopold's Soliloquy' (1905), and by the pessimistic sketches collected in the privately published What Is Man? (1906). The unfinished novel The Mysterious Stranger was perhaps the most uncompromisingly dark of all Twain's later works. In his last years, his financial troubles finally resolved, Twain settled near Redding, Connecticut, and died in his mansion, Stormfield, on April 21, 1910.

Author biography courtesy of Random House, Inc.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Samuel Langhorne Clemens (real name); Sieur Louis de Conte
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 30, 1835
    2. Place of Birth:
      Florida, Missouri
    1. Date of Death:
      April 21, 1910
    2. Place of Death:
      Redding, Connecticut

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2006

    For a mature audience, but not for me

    I was forced to read both Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn for school and while some of the satire was funny when they talked about the flaws of society, I personally thought it was pretty boring. There were also some very confusing parts. I understand why Twain used the grammer style he did for Tom and Huck, but after a while of reading both books, the grammer really started to annoy me. Maybe when I'm older I'll be able to appreciate the books, but as a teenager I would not recommend you read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2003

    Impressed by Twain

    This was the first time I read Huckleberry Finn and once I picked it up I could not put it down. I am truly impressed with Twain's literary techniques and his ability to capture so much feeling and emotion through words. I enjoy the controversy surrounding this novel, and the way in which Twain plays upon it. Twain puts down on paper the feelings and emotions of people of many divergent backgrounds while giving us a taste of what life might have been like in the late 19th century. The story deals with many important issues such as slavery, adolescence and independence. He raises many points that arouse the reader to become interested and truly engaged in the novel. Huck represents Twain's strong anti-slavery feelings and other societal standards that he feels should be broken. The dialogue in the novel can be a bit of a distraction, but I feel that it adds to the truth of the story. Overall it was a very enjoyable read and a nice change from the books I have recently read. I would recommend this novel to anyone who is interested in classic American literature or just a well written novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2003

    Huckleberry Finn

    This is the second time I have read the book and it was just as good as the first time through. I love the witty dialect Twain incorporates into the story to create a southern ambiance of the 19th century. This book was a hugely controversial at its time due to the fact a young white boy and a run-a-way slave team up together and sail the Mississippi in seek of adventure. I find the book really weird, kind of on a Sci-Fi level, with everything involving how the two families kill each other including their children. Today¿s world is full of people trapped in the routine of society¿s standards and Huck is a perfect example of what many people want ¿ independence. I like how Huck, even though without a proper family oriented upbringing, is able to distinguish from right and wrong. It shows the incredible mental capacity humans have in their ability to reason.

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