The Aeneid of Virgil / Edition 2

The Aeneid of Virgil / Edition 2

3.9 24
by Virgil, Barry Moser
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0520254155

ISBN-13: 9780520254152

Pub. Date: 09/03/2007

Publisher: University of California Press


"A brilliant translation; the only one since Dryden which reads like English verse and conveys some of the majesty and pathos of the original."—Bernard M. W. Knox

"Mandelbaum has . . . given us a contemporary experience of the masterpiece, at last."—David Ignatow

"The book has a wonderful, detailed liveliness in every line."—Robert

Overview


"A brilliant translation; the only one since Dryden which reads like English verse and conveys some of the majesty and pathos of the original."—Bernard M. W. Knox

"Mandelbaum has . . . given us a contemporary experience of the masterpiece, at last."—David Ignatow

"The book has a wonderful, detailed liveliness in every line."—Robert Fagles

"Comes closer to the impossible goal of perfection than any of the numerous efforts that have poured out of American and British presses since World War II."—William S. Anderson

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780520254152
Publisher:
University of California Press
Publication date:
09/03/2007
Edition description:
35th Anniversary Edition
Pages:
423
Sales rank:
283,486
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.13(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction     1
Map: The Voyages of Aeneas     42
Virgil: The Aeneid
Safe Haven After Storm     47
The Final Hours of Troy     74
Landfalls, Ports of Call     103
The Tragic Queen of Carthage     127
Funeral Games for Anchises     153
The Kingdom of the Dead     182
Beachhead in Latium, Armies Gather     213
The Shield of Aeneas     241
Enemy at the Gates     266
Captains Fight and Die     293
Camilla's Finest Hour     324
The Sword Decides All     355
Notes
Translator's Postscript     387
Genealogy: The Royal Houses of Greece and Troy     404
Suggestions for Further Reading     406
Variants from the Oxford Classical Text     410
Notes on the Translation     411
Pronouncing Glossary     424

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The Aeneid of Virgil 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
ShelaghAZ More than 1 year ago
...and I mean literally not logically. This particular book is a photocopy of a paperback book so the writing is very small even when put to extra, extra large. The full text is there so I am not disappointed with the material.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This review relates to Allen Mandelbaum's English verse translation of Virgil's -Aeneid-. (Bantam Books; 1961/1981). This edition is excellent for the opening 'life' of Virgil, for Mandelbaum's 'Introduction,' and for his verse translation of Virgil's epic (poem) as well. Mandelbaum's explanation for his own overlooking of Virgil's greatness in his youth because of a tendency to listen to the critical perspectives of others who compared him unfavorably to Homer or because the critic saw the heroes depicted as figures who 'live the cool and limited existence of shadows, nourished by the blood of noble zeal, blood that has been sacrificed in the attempt to recall what has forever disappeared,' all mislead (as Mandelbaum now believes) the reader from truly appreciating the depth and fully human awarenesses that Virgil puts into his epic. Some of the 'Introduction,' is too academic and studied in its inspective fussiness, but then Mandelbaum will come up with something enlivening and satisfying like this: 'Virgil does not have Plato's humor; but he does have Platonic tolerance (and more compassion than Plato). And if the relative weights of the Epicurean, the Stoic, the Pythagorean in him are often hard to assess, his humanity is constant -- and vital, not lumbering, not marmoreal. And not shrill; and when, with the goad of public despair, my own poetic voice has had to struggle often with shrillness, the work on this translation has been most welcome.' Wondrous and insightful. Mandelbaum's verse translation: 'Their minds and hearts were one;/in war they charged together; and now, too,/they shared a sentry station at one gate./ And Nisus says: 'Euryalus, is it/the gods who put this fire in our minds,/or is it that each man's relentless longing becomes a god to him?''
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....! 
manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Amazing.....!Excellent......!Just enjoy it.....!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I Find The Fitzgerald and Fagles translations of Virgil's AENEID to be the best readable copies of this classical work- but Mandelbaum's version is a close second in readability & enjoyment. The Nook version of this Bantam Classics paperback is surprisingly clear and easy to read(in the "publisher's default" section of the Nook's font menu). A previous reviewer stated the type/scanning was poor- but I found no typos or anything negative with the eBook. 3 stars.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
What a wondeful translation of Vergil's Aeneid. As a student of the classics, I found Mandelbaum's translation pleasant to read in English, as the verse, which I dislike in most English translations from Latin, flowed smoothly and kept up a lively pace. As a 3rd year Latin student translating the Aenead, it made a perfect reference for checking my translations because it stayed so true to the original Latin without becoming dry to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Aeneid is a great book for an itelligent teenager or interested adult. The book is very detailed and in depth. I would suggest foot notes for this book. It introduces many characters and in depth ideas.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okkk I &hearts Hunger Games not this &#9786