Overview

Aesop (c620-560 BC), known only for the genre of fables ascribed to him, was by tradition a slave who was a contemporary of Croesus and Peisistratus in the mid-sixth century BC in ancient Greece. The various collections that go under the rubric Aesop's Fables are still taught as moral lessons and used as subjects for various entertainments, especially children's plays and cartoons. Most of what are known as Aesopic fables is a compilation of tales from various sources, many of which originated with authors who ...
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Overview

Aesop (c620-560 BC), known only for the genre of fables ascribed to him, was by tradition a slave who was a contemporary of Croesus and Peisistratus in the mid-sixth century BC in ancient Greece. The various collections that go under the rubric Aesop's Fables are still taught as moral lessons and used as subjects for various entertainments, especially children's plays and cartoons. Most of what are known as Aesopic fables is a compilation of tales from various sources, many of which originated with authors who lived long before Aesop. Aesop himself is said to have composed many fables, which were passed down by oral tradition. Socrates was thought to have spent his time turning Aesop's fables into verse while he was in prison. Demetrius Phalereus, another Greek philosopher, made the first collection of these fables around 300 BC. This was later translated into Latin by Phaedrus, a slave himself, around 25 BC. The fables from these two collections were soon brought together and were eventually retranslated into Greek by Babrius around A. D. 230. Many additional fables were included, and the collection was in turn translated to Arabic and Hebrew, further enriched by additional fables from these cultures.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486172705
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 12/12/2012
  • Series: Dover Children's Classics
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • File size: 17 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Read an Excerpt

Aesop's Fables


By V. S. Vernon Jones, Arthur Rackham

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2014 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-17270-5



CHAPTER 1

THE FOX AND THE GRAPES


A HUNGRY Fox saw some fine bunches of Grapes hanging from a vine that was trained along a high trellis, and did his best to reach them by jumping as high as he could into the air. But it was all in vain, for they were just out of reach: so he gave up trying, and walked away with an air of dignity and unconcern, remarking, "I thought those Grapes were ripe, but I see now they are quite sour."


THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGGS

A MAN and his Wife had the good fortune to possess a Goose which laid a Golden Egg every day. Lucky though they were, they soon began to think they were not getting rich fast enough, and, imagining the bird must be made of gold inside, they decided to kill it in order to secure the whole store of precious metal at once. But when they cut it open they found it was just like any other goose. Thus, they neither got rich all at once, as they had hoped, nor enjoyed any longer the daily addition to their wealth.


Much wants more and loses all.


THE CAT AND THE MICE

THERE was once a house that was overrun with Mice. A Cat heard of this, and said to herself, "That's the place for me," and off she went and took up her quarters in the house, and caught the Mice one by one and ate them. At last the Mice could stand it no longer, and they determined to take to their holes and stay there. "That's awkward," said the Cat to herself: "the only thing to do is to coax them out by a trick." So she considered a while, and then climbed up the wall and let herself hang down by her hind legs from a peg, and pretended to be dead. By and by a Mouse peeped out and saw the Cat hanging there. "Aha ! " it cried, "you're very clever, madam, no doubt: but you may turn yourself into a bag of meal hanging there, if you like, yet you won't catch us coming anywhere near you.

If you are wise you won't be deceived by the innocent airs of those whom you have once found to be dangerous.


THE MISCHIEVOUS DOG

THERE was once a Dog who used to snap at people and bite them without any provocation, and who was a great nuisance to every one who came to his master's house. So his master fastened a bell round his neck to warn people of his presence. The Dog was very proud of the bell, and strutted about tinkling it with immense satisfaction. But an old dog came up to him and said, "The fewer airs you give yourself the better, my friend. You don't think, do you, that your bell was given you as a reward of merit? On the contrary, it is a badge of disgrace."


Notoriety is often mistaken for fame.


THE CHARCOAL-BURNER AND THE FULLER

THERE was once a Charcoal-burner who lived and worked by himself. A Fuller, however, happened to come and settle in the same neighbourhood; and the Charcoal-burner, having made his acquaintance and finding he was an agreeable sort of fellow, asked him if he would come and share his house: "We shall get to know one another better that way," he said, "and, beside, our household expenses will be diminished." The Fuller thanked him, but replied, "I couldn't think of it, sir: why, everything I take such pains to whiten would be blackened in no time by your charcoal."


THE MICE IN COUNCIL

ONCE upon a time all the Mice met together in Council, and discussed the best means of securing themselves against the attacks of the cat. After several suggestions had been debated, a Mouse of some standing and experience got up and said, "I think I have hit upon a plan which will ensure our safety in the future, provided you approve and carry it out. It is that we should fasten a bell round the neck of our enemy the cat, which will by its tinkling warn us of her approach." This proposal was warmly applauded, and it had been already decided to adopt it, when an old Mouse got upon his feet and said, "I agree with you all that the plan before us is an admirable one: but may I ask who is going to bell the cat?"


THE BAT AND THE WEASELS

A BAT fell to the ground and was caught by a Weasel, and was just going to be killed and eaten when it begged to be let go. The Weasel said he couldn't do that because he was an enemy of all birds on principle. "Oh, but," said the Bat, "I'm not a bird at all: I'm a mouse." "So you are," said the Weasel, " now I come to look at you"; and he let it go. Some time after this the Bat was caught in just the same way by another Weasel, and, as before, begged for its life. "No," said the Weasel, "I never let a mouse go by any chance." "But I'm not a mouse," said the Bat; "I'm a bird." "Why, so you are," said the Weasel; and he too let the Bat go.

Look and see which way the wind blows before you commit yourself.


THE DOG AND THE SOW

A DOG and a Sow were arguing and each claimed that its own young ones were finer than those of any other animal. "Well," said the Sow at last, "mine can see, at any rate, when they come into the world: but yours are born blind."


THE FOX AND THE CROW

ACROW was sitting on a branch of a tree with a piece of cheese in her beak when a Fox observed her and set his wits to work to discover some way of getting the cheese. Coming and standing under the tree he looked up and said, "What a noble bird I see above me! Her beauty is without equal, the hue of her plumage exquisite. If only her voice is as sweet as her looks are fair, she ought without doubt to be Queen of the Birds." The Crow was hugely flattered by this, and just to show the Fox that she could sing she gave a loud caw. Down came the cheese, of course, and the Fox, snatching it up, said, "You have a voice, madam, I see: what you want is wits."


THE HORSE AND THE GROOM

THERE was once a Groom who used to spend long hours clipping and combing the Horse of which he had charge, but who daily stole a portion of his allowance of oats, and sold it for his own profit. The Horse gradually got into worse and worse condition, and at last cried to the Groom, "If you really want me to look sleek and well, you must comb me less and feed me more."


THE WOLF AND THE LAMB

A WOLF came upon a Lamb straying from the flock, and felt some compunction about taking the life of so helpless a creature without some plausible excuse; so he cast about for a grievance and said at last, "Last year, sirrah, you grossly insulted me." "That is impossible, sir," bleated the Lamb, "for I wasn't born then." "Well," retorted the Wolf, "you feed in my pastures." "That cannot be," replied the Lamb, "for I have never yet tasted grass." "You drink from my spring, then," continued the Wolf. "Indeed, sir," said the poor Lamb, "I have never yet drunk anything but my mother's milk." "Well, anyhow," said the Wolf, "I'm not going without my dinner": and he sprang upon the Lamb and devoured it without more ado.


THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE

A PEACOCK taunted a Crane with the dullness of her plumage. "Look at my brilliant colours," said she, "and see how much finer they are than your poor feathers." "I am not denying," replied the Crane, "that yours are far gayer than mine; but when it comes to flying I can soar into the clouds, whereas you are confined to the earth like any dunghill cock."


THE CAT AND THE BIRDS

A CAT heard that the Birds in an aviary were ailing. So he got himself up as a doctor, and, taking with him a set of the instruments proper to his profession, presented himself at the door, and inquired after the health of the Birds. "We shall do very well," they replied, without letting him in, "when we've seen the last of you."

A villain may disguise himself, but he will not deceive the wise.


THE SPENDTHRIFT AND THE SWALLOW

A SPENDTHRIFT, who had wasted his fortune, and had nothing left but the clothes in which he stood, saw a Swallow one fine day in early spring. Thinking that summer had come, and that he could now do without his coat, he went and sold it for what it would fetch. A change, however, took place in the weather, and there came a sharp frost which killed the unfortunate Swallow. When the Spendthrift saw its dead body he cried, "Miserable bird ! Thanks to you I am perishing of cold myself."


One swallow does not make summer.


THE OLD WOMAN AND THE DOCTOR

AN Old Woman became almost totally blind from a disease of the eyes, and, after consulting a Doctor, made an agreement with him in the presence of witnesses that she should pay him a high fee if he cured her, while if he failed he was to receive nothing. The Doctor accordingly prescribed a course of treatment, and every time he paid her a visit he took away with him some article out of the house, until at last, when he visited her for the last time, and the cure was complete, there was nothing left. When the Old Woman saw that the house was empty she refused to pay him his fee; and, after repeated refusals on her part, he sued her before the magistrates for payment of her debt. On being brought into court she was ready with her defence. "The claimant," said she, "has stated the facts about our agreement correctly. I undertook to pay him a fee if he cured me, and he, on his part, promised to charge nothing if he failed. Now, he says I am cured; but I say that I am blinder than ever, and I can prove what I say. When my eyes were bad I could at any rate see well enough to be aware that my house contained a certain amount of furniture and other things; but now, when according to him I am cured, I am entirely unable to see anything there at all."


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Aesop's Fables by V. S. Vernon Jones, Arthur Rackham. Copyright © 2014 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Title Page,
Copyright Page,
INTRODUCTION,
THE FOX AND THE GRAPES,
THE GOOSE THAT LAID THE GOLDEN EGGS,
THE CAT AND THE MICE,
THE MISCHIEVOUS DOG,
THE CHARCOAL-BURNER AND THE FULLER,
THE MICE IN COUNCIL,
THE BAT AND THE WEASELS,
THE DOG AND THE SOW,
THE FOX AND THE CROW,
THE HORSE AND THE GROOM,
THE WOLF AND THE LAMB,
THE PEACOCK AND THE CRANE,
THE CAT AND THE BIRDS,
THE SPENDTHRIFT AND THE SWALLOW,
THE OLD WOMAN AND THE DOCTOR,
THE MOON AND HER MOTHER,
MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN,
THE ASS, THE FOX, AND THE LION,
THE LION AND THE MOUSE,
THE CROW AND THE PITCHER,
THE BOYS AND THE FROGS,
THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN,
THE MISTRESS AND HER SERVANTS,
THE GOODS AND THE ILLS,
THE HARES AND THE FROGS,
THE FOX AND THE STORK,
THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING,
THE STAG IN THE OX-STALL,
THE MILKMAID AND HER PAIL,
THE DOLPHINS, THE WHALES, AND THE SPRAT,
THE FOX AND THE MONKEY,
THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG,
THE FIR-TREE AND THE BRAMBLE,
THE FROGS' COMPLAINT AGAINST THE SUN,
THE DOG, THE COCK, AND THE FOX,
THE GNAT AND THE BULL,
THE BEAR AND THE TRAVELLERS,
THE SLAVE AND THE LION,
THE FLEA AND THE MAN,
THE BEE AND JUPITER,
THE OAK AND THE REEDS,
THE BLIND MAN AND THE CUB,
THE BOY AND THE SNAILS,
THE APES AND THE TWO TRAVELLERS,
THE ASS AND HIS BURDENS,
THE SHEPHERD'S BOY AND THE WOLF,
THE FOX AND THE GOAT,
THE FISHERMAN AND THE SPRAT,
THE BOASTING TRAVELLER,
THE CRAB AND HIS MOTHER,
THE ASS AND HIS SHADOW,
THE FARMER AND HIS SONS,
THE DOG AND THE COOK,
THE MONKEY AS KING,
THE THIEVES AND THE COCK,
THE FARMER AND FORTUNE,
JUPITER AND THE MONKEY,
FATHER AND SONS,
THE LAMP,
THE OWL AND THE BIRDS,
THE ASS IN THE LION'S SKIN,
THE SHE-GOATS AND THEIR BEARDS,
THE OLD LION,
THE BOY BATHING,
THE QUACK FROG,
THE SWOLLEN FOX,
THE MOUSE, THE FROG, AND THE HAWK,
THE BOY AND THE NETTLES,
THE PEASANT AND THE APPLE-TREE,
THE JACKDAW AND THE PIGEONS,
JUPITER AND THE TORTOISE,
THE DOG IN THE MANGER,
THE TWO BAGS,
THE OXEN AND THE AXLETREES,
THE BOY AND THE FILBERTS,
THE FROGS ASKING FOR A KING,
THE OLIVE-TREE AND THE FIG-TREE,
THE LION AND THE BOAR,
THE WALNUT-TREE,
THE MAN AND THE LION,
THE TORTOISE AND THE EAGLE,
THE KID ON THE HOUSETOP,
THE FOX WITHOUT A TAIL,
THE VAIN JACKDAW,
THE TRAVELLER AND HIS DOG,
THE SHIPWRECKED MAN AND THE SEA,
THE WILD BOAR AND THE FOX,
MERCURY AND THE SCULPTOR,
THE FAWN AND HIS MOTHER,
THE FOX AND THE LION,
THE EAGLE AND HIS CAPTOR,
THE BLACKSMITH AND HIS DOG,
THE STAG AT THE POOL,
THE DOG AND THE SHADOW,
MERCURY AND THE TRADESMEN,
THE MICE AND THE WEASELS,
THE PEACOCK AND JUNO,
THE BEAR AND THE FOX,
THE ASS AND THE OLD PEASANT,
THE OX AND THE FROG,
THE MAN AND THE IMAGE,
HERCULES AND THE WAGGONER,
THE POMEGRANATE, THE APPLE-TREE, AND THE BRAMBLE,
THE LION, THE BEAR, AND THE FOX,
THE BLACKAMOOR,
THE TWO SOLDIERS AND THE ROBBER,
THE LION AND THE WILD ASS,
THE MAN AND THE SATYR,
THE IMAGE-SELLER,
THE EAGLE AND THE ARROW,
THE RICH MAN AND THE TANNER,
THE WOLF, THE MOTHER, AND HER CHILD,
THE OLD WOMAN AND THE WINE-JAR,
THE LIONESS AND THE VIXEN,
THE VIPER AND THE FILE,
THE CAT AND THE COCK,
THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE,
THE SOLDIER AND HIS HORSE,
THE OXEN AND THE BUTCHERS,
THE WOLF AND THE LION,
THE SHEEP, THE WOLF, AND THE STAG,
THE LION AND THE THREE BULLS,
THE HORSE AND HIS RIDER,
THE GOAT AND THE VINE,
THE TWO POTS,
THE OLD HOUND,
THE CLOWN AND THE COUNTRYMAN,
THE LARK AND THE FARMER,
THE LION AND THE ASS,
THE PROPHET,
THE HOUND AND THE HARE,
THE LION, THE MOUSE, AND THE FOX,
THE TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER,
THE WOLF AND THE CRANE,
THE EAGLE, THE CAT, AND THE WILD SOW,
THE WOLF AND THE SHEEP,
THE TUNNY-FISH AND THE DOLPHIN,
THE THREE TRADESMEN,
THE MOUSE AND THE BULL,
THE HARE AND THE HOUND,
THE TOWN MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE,
THE LION AND THE BULL,
THE WOLF, THE FOX, AND THE APE,
THE EAGLE AND THE COCKS,
THE ESCAPED JACKDAW,
THE FARMER AND THE FOX,
VENUS AND THE CAT,
THE CROW AND THE SWAN,
THE STAG WITH ONE EYE,
THE FLY AND THE DRAUGHT-MULE,
THE COCK AND THE JEWEL,
THE WOLF AND THE SHEPHERD,
THE FARMER AND THE STORK,
THE CHARGER AND THE MILLER,
THE GRASSHOPPER AND THE OWL,
THE GRASSHOPPER AND THE ANTS,
THE FARMER AND THE VIPER,
THE TWO FROGS,
THE COBBLER TURNED DOCTOR,
THE ASS, THE COCK, AND THE LION,
THE BELLY AND THE MEMBERS,
THE BALD MAN AND THE FLY,
THE ASS AND THE WOLF,
THE MONKEY AND THE CAMEL,
THE SICK MAN AND THE DOCTOR,
THE TRAVELLERS AND THE PLANE-TREE,
THE FLEA AND THE OX,
THE BIRDS, THE BEASTS, AND THE BAT,
THE MAN AND HIS TWO SWEETHEARTS,
THE EAGLE, THE JACKDAW, AND THE SHEPHERD,
THE WOLF AND THE BOY,
THE MILLER, HIS SON, AND THEIR ASS,
THE STAG AND THE VINE,
THE LAMB CHASED BY A WOLF,
THE ARCHER AND THE LION,
THE WOLF AND THE GOAT,
THE SICK STAG,
THE ASS AND THE MULE,
BROTHER AND SISTER,
THE HEIFER AND THE OX,
THE KINGDOM OF THE LION,
THE ASS AND HIS DRIVER,
THE LION AND THE HARE,
THE WOLVES AND THE DOGS,
THE BULL AND THE CALF,
THE TREES AND THE AXE,
THE ASTRONOMER,
THE LABOURER AND THE SNAKE,
THE CAGE-BIRD AND THE BAT,
THE ASS AND HIS PURCHASER,
THE KID AND THE WOLF,
THE DEBTOR AND HIS SOW,
THE BALD HUNTSMAN,
THE HERDSMAN AND THE LOST BULL,
THE MULE,
THE HOUND AND THE FOX,
THE FATHER AND HIS DAUGHTERS,
THE THIEF AND THE INNKEEPER,
THE PACK-ASS AND THE WILD ASS,
THE ASS AND HIS MASTERS,
THE PACK-ASS, THE WILD ASS, AND THE LION,
THE ANT,
THE FROGS AND THE WELL,
THE CRAB AND THE FOX,
THE FOX AND THE GRASSHOPPER,
THE FARMER, HIS BOY, AND THE ROOKS,
THE ASS AND THE DOG,
THE ASS CARRYING THE IMAGE,
THE ATHENIAN AND THE THEBAN,
THE GOATHERD AND THE GOAT,
THE SHEEP AND THE DOG,
THE SHEPHERD AND THE WOLF,
THE LION, JUPITER, AND THE ELEPHANT,
THE PIG AND THE SHEEP,
THE GARDENER AND HIS DOG,
THE RIVERS AND THE SEA,
THE LION IN LOVE,
THE BEE-KEEPER,
THE WOLF AND THE HORSE,
THE BAT, THE BRAMBLE, AND THE SEAGULL,
THE DOG AND THE WOLF,
THE WASP AND THE SNAKE,
THE EAGLE AND THE BEETLE,
THE FOWLER AND THE LARK,
THE FISHERMAN PIPING,
THE WEASEL AND THE MAN,
THE PLOUGHMAN, THE ASS, AND THE OX,
DEMADES AND HIS FABLE,
THE MONKEY AND THE DOLPHIN,
THE CROW AND THE SNAKE,
THE DOGS AND THE FOX,
THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE HAWK,
THE ROSE AND THE AMARANTH,
THE MAN, THE HORSE, THE OX, AND THE DOG,
THE WOLVES, THE SHEEP, AND THE RAM,
THE SWAN,
THE SNAKE AND JUPITER,
THE WOLF AND HIS SHADOW,
THE PLOUGHMAN AND THE WOLF,
MERCURY AND THE MAN BITTEN BY AN ANT,
THE WILY LION,
THE PARROT AND THE CAT,
THE STAG AND THE LION,
THE IMPOSTOR,
THE DOGS AND THE HIDES,
THE LION, THE FOX, AND THE ASS,
THE FOWLER, THE PARTRIDGE, AND THE COCK,
THE GNAT AND THE LION,
THE FARMER AND HIS DOGS,
THE EAGLE AND THE FOX,
THE BUTCHER AND HIS CUSTOMERS,
HERCULES AND MINERVA,
THE FOX WHO SERVED A LION,
THE QUACK DOCTOR,
THE LION, THE WOLF, AND THE FOX,
HERCULES AND PLUTUS,
THE FOX AND THE LEOPARD,
THE FOX AND THE HEDGEHOG,
THE CROW AND THE RAVEN,
THE WITCH,
THE OLD MAN AND DEATH,
THE MISER,
THE FOXES AND THE RIVER,
THE HORSE AND THE STAG,
THE FOX AND THE BRAMBLE,
THE FOX AND THE SNAKE,
THE LION, THE FOX, AND THE STAG,
THE MAN WHO LOST HIS SPADE,
THE PARTRIDGE AND THE FOWLER,
THE RUNAWAY SLAVE,
THE HUNTER AND THE WOODMAN,
THE SERPENT AND THE EAGLE,
THE ROGUE AND THE ORACLE,
THE HORSE AND THE ASS,
THE DOG CHASING A WOLF,
GRIEF AND HIS DUE,
THE HAWK, THE KITE, AND THE PIGEONS,
THE WOMAN AND THE FARMER,
PROMETHEUS AND THE MAKING OF MAN,
THE SWALLOW AND THE CROW,
THE HUNTER AND THE HORSEMAN,
THE GOATHERD AND THE WILD GOATS,
THE NIGHTINGALE AND THE SWALLOW,
THE TRAVELLER AND FORTUNE,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2014

    Broken

    Nevermind

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  • Posted July 6, 2014

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2013

    Hi

    :) ok book i guess

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