The Aesthetics of Mimesis: Ancient Texts and Modern Problems / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $18.77
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 60%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (14) from $18.77   
  • New (10) from $26.98   
  • Used (4) from $18.77   

Overview

Mimesis is one of the oldest, most fundamental concepts in Western aesthetics. This book offers a new, searching treatment of its long history at the center of theories of representational art: above all, in the highly influential writings of Plato and Aristotle, but also in later Greco-Roman philosophy and criticism, and subsequently in many areas of aesthetic controversy from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Combining classical scholarship, philosophical analysis, and the history of ideas--and ranging across discussion of poetry, painting, and music--Stephen Halliwell shows with a wealth of detail how mimesis, at all stages of its evolution, has been a more complex, variable concept than its conventional translation of "imitation" can now convey.

Far from providing a static model of artistic representation, mimesis has generated many different models of art, encompassing a spectrum of positions from realism to idealism. Under the influence of Platonist and Aristotelian paradigms, mimesis has been a crux of debate between proponents of what Halliwell calls "world-reflecting" and "world-simulating" theories of representation in both the visual and musico-poetic arts. This debate is about not only the fraught relationship between art and reality but also the psychology and ethics of how we experience and are affected by mimetic art.

Moving expertly between ancient and modern traditions, Halliwell contends that the history of mimesis hinges on problems that continue to be of urgent concern for contemporary aesthetics.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Bryn Mawr Classical Review

Halliwell has given the cognitivist position a highly nuanced, philosophically sophisticated version that will command the attention of scholars of classical and Western literary criticism.
— Andrew Ford
Times Literary Supplement - Michael Silk
Stephen Halliwell's formidable book . . . is scholarly, lucid, wide-ranging, discriminating. . . . An outstanding example of taking ideas seriously, and one that deserves a wide and intelligent readership.
Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews - Andrew Ford
Halliwell has given the cognitivist position a highly nuanced, philosophically sophisticated version that will command the attention of scholars of classical and Western literary criticism.
The Philosophical Quarterly - David Konstan
A magisterial survey . . . immensely learned and meticulously argued. . . . [It] will be indispensable to any future discussion of art and representation in classical antiquity.
From the Publisher

"Stephen Halliwell's formidable book . . . is scholarly, lucid, wide-ranging, discriminating. . . . An outstanding example of taking ideas seriously, and one that deserves a wide and intelligent readership."--Michael Silk, Times Literary Supplement

"Halliwell has given the cognitivist position a highly nuanced, philosophically sophisticated version that will command the attention of scholars of classical and Western literary criticism."--Andrew Ford, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

"A magisterial survey . . . immensely learned and meticulously argued. . . . [It] will be indispensable to any future discussion of art and representation in classical antiquity."--David Konstan, The Philosophical Quarterly

Times Literary Supplement
Stephen Halliwell's formidable book . . . is scholarly, lucid, wide-ranging, discriminating. . . . An outstanding example of taking ideas seriously, and one that deserves a wide and intelligent readership.
— Michael Silk
Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews
Halliwell has given the cognitivist position a highly nuanced, philosophically sophisticated version that will command the attention of scholars of classical and Western literary criticism.
— Andrew Ford
The Philosophical Quarterly
A magisterial survey . . . immensely learned and meticulously argued. . . . [It] will be indispensable to any future discussion of art and representation in classical antiquity.
— David Konstan
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691092584
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/1/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 440
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents


Preface vii
Acknowledgments xi
Note to the Reader xiii
INTRODUCTION: Mimesis and the History of Aesthetics 1
PART I
CHAPTER ONE
Representation and Reality: Plato and Mimesis 37
CHAPTER TWO
Romantic Puritanism: Plato and the Psychology of Mimesis 72
CHAPTER THREE
Mimesis and the Best Life: Plato's Repudiation of the Tragic 98
CHAPTER FOUR
More Than Meets the Eye: Looking into Plato's Mirror 118
PART II
CHAPTER FIVE
Inside and Outside the Work of Art: Aristotelian Mimesis Reevaluated 151
CHAPTER SIX
The Rewards of Mimesis: Pleasure, Understanding, and Emotion in Aristotle's Aesthetics 177
CHAPTER SEVEN
Tragic Pity: Aristotle and Beyond 207
CHAPTER EIGHT
Music and the Limits of Mimesis: Aristotle versus Philodemus 234
PART III
CHAPTER NINE
Truth or Delusion?The Mimeticist Legacy in Hellenistic Philosophy 263
CHAPTER TEN
Images of Life: Mimesis and Literary Criticism after Aristotle 287
CHAPTER ELEVEN
Renewal and Transformation: Neoplatonism and Mimesis 313
CHAPTER TWELVE
An Inheritance Contested: Renaissance to Modernity 344
Bibliography 383
Index 419
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Mimesis and the History of Aesthetics 1
PART I
CHAPTER ONE
Representation and Reality: Plato and Mimesis 37
CHAPTER TWO
Romantic Puritanism: Plato and the Psychology of Mimesis 72
CHAPTER THREE
Mimesis and the Best Life: Plato's Repudiation of the Tragic 98
CHAPTER FOUR
More Than Meets the Eye: Looking into Plato's Mirror 118
PART II
CHAPTER FIVE
Inside and Outside the Work of Art: Aristotelian Mimesis Reevaluated 151
CHAPTER SIX
The Rewards of Mimesis: Pleasure, Understanding, and Emotion in Aristotle's Aesthetics 177
CHAPTER SEVEN
Tragic Pity: Aristotle and Beyond 207
CHAPTER EIGHT
Music and the Limits of Mimesis: Aristotle versus Philodemus 234
PART III
CHAPTER NINE
Truth or Delusion?The Mimeticist Legacy in Hellenistic Philosophy 263
CHAPTER TEN
Images of Life: Mimesis and Literary Criticism after Aristotle 287
CHAPTER ELEVEN
Renewal and Transformation: Neoplatonism and Mimesis 313
CHAPTER TWELVE
An Inheritance Contested: Renaissance to Modernity 344
Bibliography 383
Index 419
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)