The Affair (Jack Reacher Series #16)

The Affair (Jack Reacher Series #16)

4.0 642
by Lee Child

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With Reacher, #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child has created “a series that stands in the front rank of modern thrillers” (The Washington Post).
Everything starts somewhere. . . .

For elite military cop Jack Reacher, that somewhere was Carter Crossing, Mississippi, way back in 1997. A lonely railroad track

…  See more details below


With Reacher, #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child has created “a series that stands in the front rank of modern thrillers” (The Washington Post).
Everything starts somewhere. . . .

For elite military cop Jack Reacher, that somewhere was Carter Crossing, Mississippi, way back in 1997. A lonely railroad track. A crime scene. A coverup.

A young woman is dead, and solid evidence points to a soldier at a nearby military base. But that soldier has powerful friends in Washington.

Reacher is ordered undercoverto find out everything he can, to control the local police, and then to vanish. Reacher is a good soldier. But when he gets to Carter Crossing, he finds layers no one saw coming, and the investigation spins out of control.

Local sheriff Elizabeth Deveraux has a thirst for justiceand an appetite for secrets. Uncertain they can trust one another, Reacher and Deveraux reluctantly join forces. Reacher works to uncover the truth, while others try to bury it forever. The conspiracy threatens to shatter his faith in his mission, and turn him into a man to be feared.

A novel of unrelenting suspense that could only come from the pen of #1 New York Times bestselling author Lee Child, The Affair is the start of the Reacher saga, a thriller that takes Reacher—and his readers—right to the edge . . . and beyond.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for #1 bestselling author Lee Child and his Reacher series
“Child is a superb craftsman of suspense.”—Entertainment Weekly
“The truth about Reacher gets better and better.”—Janet Maslin, The New York Times
“Implausible, irresistible Reacher remains just about the best butt-kicker in thriller-lit.”—Kirkus Reviews
“Like his hero Jack Reacher, Lee Child seems to make no wrong steps.”—Associated Press
“Lee Child [is] the current poster-boy of American crime fiction.”—Los Angeles Times
“Indisputably the best escape artist in this escapist genre.”—Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times
“Jack Reacher is much more like the heir to the Op and Marlowe than Spenser ever was.”—Esquire
Janet Maslin
Mr. Child's 16th book, The Affair, shakes up the status quo by delivering the Reacher creation myth…it presents his most colorful appearance in a long time. It establishes Reacher's idealistic but vengeful personality and lays out the rules by which he lives.
—The New York Times

With Jack Reacher, bestselling Lee Child has created "a series that stands in the front rank of modern thrillers" (Washington Post). This suspenseful episode fills in his backstory.

Sessalee Hensley

Publishers Weekly
Child’s compelling 16th thriller featuring incorruptible vigilante Jack Reacher (after Worth Dying For) rewinds the clock to 1997 when Reacher was still a military cop and working on the case that led to his eventual break with the Army. Reacher must figure out whether the shocking murder of 27-year-old Janice May Chapman in Carter Crossing, Miss., has any connection with nearby Fort Kelham, where Army Rangers are trained. Reacher soon learns that two other women had their throats slit in the same way as Chapman, and the leading suspect is a Fort Kelham captain, whose father is a U.S. senator and diehard Army supporter. Reacher knows all too well the case has political trouble written all over it—and he and his Army bosses quickly butt heads over how it should be handled. Readers expecting new insight or details into Reacher’s background will be disappointed, but they’ll find all the elements—solid action, wry humor, smart dialogue—that have made this series so popular. (Oct.)
Library Journal
What turned career army cop Jack Reacher into the wandering and deadly version of a knight in rusted armor? In this 16th novel in the highly successful Reacher franchise, Child goes back to small-town Mississippi in 1997. Women have been murdered near a secret Ranger base. The Rangers are suspected, and the official investigation is a mess. Reacher is sent to town disguised as a bum to keep one eye on what might be a flawed army investigation, the other on a series of similar killings in the town, and if he had a third eye, he would use it to cover his back. VERDICT Exciting and suspenseful, with deceit and cover-ups, violence, and sex, this is another great entry in Child's compelling series. Reacher's many fans can only hope there will be many more. Highly recommended for anyone who likes intelligent, well-written, tense thrillers. [Library marketing; see Prepub Alert, 4/4/11; to the dismay of series fans, the diminutive Tom Cruise is slated to play the six-foot-tall Reacher in a film adaptation of Child's One Shot.—Ed.]—Robert Conroy, Warren, MI

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Product Details

Diversified Publishing
Publication date:
Jack Reacher Series, #16
Edition description:
Large Print
Sales rank:
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 6.06(h) x 1.27(d)

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

The Pentagon is the world's largest office building, six and a half million square feet, thirty thousand people, more than seventeen miles of corridors, but it was built with just three street doors, each one of them opening into a guarded pedestrian lobby. I chose the southeast option, the main concourse entrance, the one nearest the Metro and the bus station, because it was the busiest and the most popular with civilian workers, and I wanted plenty of civilian workers around, preferably a whole long unending stream of them, for insurance purposes, mostly against getting shot on sight. Arrests go bad all the time, sometimes accidentally, sometimes on purpose, so I wanted witnesses. I wanted independent eyeballs on me, at least at the beginning. I remember the date, of course. It was Tuesday, the eleventh of March, 1997, and it was the last day I walked into that place as a legal employee of the people who built it.

A long time ago.

The eleventh of March 1997 was also by chance exactly four and a half years before the world changed, on that other future Tuesday, and so like a lot of things in the old days the security at the main concourse entrance was serious without being hysterical. Not that I invited hysteria. Not from a distance. I was wearing my Class A uniform, all of it clean, pressed, polished, and spit-shined, all of it covered with thirteen years' worth of medal ribbons, badges, insignia, and citations. I was thirty-six years old, standing tall and walking ramrod straight, a totally squared away U.S. Army Military Police major in every respect, except that my hair was too long and I hadn't shaved for five days.

Back then Pentagon security was run by the Defense Protective Service, and from forty yards I saw ten of their guys in the lobby, which I thought was far too many, which made me wonder whether they were all theirs or whether some of them were actually ours, working undercover, waiting for me. Most of our skilled work is done by Warrant Officers, and they do a lot of it by pretending to be someone else. They impersonate colonels and generals and enlisted men, and anyone else they need to, and they're good at it. All in a day's work for them to throw on DPS uniforms and wait for their target. From thirty yards I didn't recognize any of them, but then, the army is a very big institution, and they would have chosen men I had never met before.

I walked on, part of a broad wash of people heading across the concourse to the doors, some men and women in uniform, either Class As like my own or the old woodland-pattern BDUs we had back then, and some men and women obviously military but out of uniform, in suits or work clothes, and some obvious civilians, some of each category carrying bags or briefcases or packages, all of each category slowing and sidestepping and shuffling as the broad wash of people narrowed to a tight arrowhead and then narrowed further still to lonely single file or collegial two-by-two, as folks got ready to stream inside. I lined up with them, on my own, single file, behind a woman with pale unworn hands and ahead of a guy in a suit that had gone shiny at the elbows. Civilians, both of them, desk workers, probably analysts of some kind, which was exactly what I wanted. Independent eyeballs. It was close to noon. There was sun in the sky and the March air had a little warmth in it. Spring, in Virginia. Across the river the cherry trees were about to wake up. The famous blossom was about to break out. All over the innocent nation airline tickets and SLR cameras lay on hall tables, ready for sightseeing trips to the capital.

I waited in line. Way ahead of me the DPS guys were doing what security guys do. Four of them were occupied with specific tasks, two manning an inquiry counter and two checking official badge holders and then waving them through an open turnstile. Two were standing directly behind the glass inside the doors, looking out, heads high, eyes front, scanning the approaching crowd. Four were hanging back in the shadows behind the turnstiles, just clumped together, shooting the shit. All ten were armed.

It was the four behind the turnstiles that worried me. No question that back in 1997 the Department of Defense was seriously puffed up and overmanned in relation to the threats we faced then, but even so it was unusual to see four on-duty guys with absolutely nothing to do. Most commands at least made their surplus personnel look busy. But these four had no obvious role. I stretched up tall and peered ahead and tried to get a look at their shoes. You can learn a lot from shoes. Undercover disguises often don't get that far, especially in a uniformed environment. The DPS was basically a beat cop role, so to the extent that a choice was available, DPS guys would go for cop shoes, big comfortable things appropriate for walking and standing all day. Undercover MP Warrant Officers might use their own shoes, which would be subtly different.

But I couldn't see their shoes. It was too dark inside, and too far away.

The line shuffled along, at a decent pre-9/11 clip. No sullen impatience, no frustration, no fear. Just old-style routine. The woman in front of me was wearing perfume. I could smell it coming off the nape of her neck. I liked it. The two guys behind the glass noticed me about ten yards out. Their gaze moved off the woman and onto me. It rested on me a beat longer than it needed to, and then it moved on to the guy behind.

Then it came back. Both men looked me over quite openly, up and down, side to side, four or five seconds, and then I shuffled forward and their attention moved behind me again. They didn't say anything to each other. Didn't say anything to anyone else, either. No warnings, no alerts. Two possible interpretations. One, best case, I was just a guy they hadn't seen before. Or maybe I stood out because I was bigger and taller than anyone within a hundred yards. Or because I was wearing a major's gold oak leaves and ribbons for some heavy-duty medals, including a Silver Star, like a real poster boy, but because of the hair and the beard I also looked like a real caveman, which visual dissonance might have been enough reason for the long second glance, just purely out of interest. Sentry duty can be boring, and unusual sights are always welcome.

Or two, worst case, they were merely confirming to themselves that some expected event had indeed happened, and that all was going according to plan. Like they had prepared and studied photographs and were saying to themselves: OK, he's here, right on time, so now we just wait two more minutes until he steps inside, and then we take him down.

Because I was expected, and I was right on time. I had a twelve o'clock appointment and matters to discuss with a particular colonel in a third-floor office in the C ring, and I was certain I would never get there. To walk head-on into a hard arrest was a pretty blunt tactic, but sometimes if you want to know for sure whether the stove is hot, the only way to find out is to touch it.

The guy ahead of the woman ahead of me stepped inside the doors and held up a badge that was attached to his neck by a lanyard. He was waved onward. The woman in front of me moved and then stopped short, because right at that moment the two DPS watchers chose to come out from behind the glass. The woman paused in place and let them squeeze out in front of her, against the pressing flow. Then she resumed her progress and stepped inside, and the two guys stopped and stood exactly where she had been, three feet in front of me, but facing in the opposite direction, toward me, not away from me.

They were blocking the door. They were looking right at me. I was pretty sure they were genuine DPS personnel. They were wearing cop shoes, and their uniforms had eased and stretched and molded themselves to their individual physiques over a long period of time. These were not disguises, snatched from a locker and put on for the first time that morning. I looked beyond the two guys, inside, at their four partners who were doing nothing, and I tried to judge the fit of their clothes, by way of comparison. It was hard to tell.

In front of me the guy on my right said, "Sir, may we help you?"

I asked, "With what?"

"Where are you headed today?"

"Do I need to tell you that?"

"No sir, absolutely not," the guy said. "But we could speed you along a little, if you like."

Probably via an inconspicuous door into a small locked room, I thought. I figured they had civilian witnesses on their mind too, the same way I did. I said, "I'm happy to wait my turn. I'm almost there, anyway."

The two guys said nothing in reply to that. Stalemate. Amateur hour. To try to start the arrest outside was dumb. I could push and shove and turn and run and be lost in the crowd in the blink of an eye. And they wouldn't shoot. Not outside. There were too many people on the concourse. Too much collateral damage. This was 1997, remember. March eleventh. Four and a half years before the new rules. Much better to wait until I was inside the lobby. The two stooges could close the doors behind me and form up shoulder to shoulder in front of them while I was getting the bad news at the desk. At that point theoretically I could turn back and fight my way past them again, but it would take me a second or two, and in that second or two the four guys with nothing to do could shoot me in the back about a thousand times.

And if I charged forward they could shoot me in the front. And where would I go anyway? To escape into the Pentagon was no kind of a good idea. The world's largest office building. Thirty thousand people. Five floors. Two basements. Seventeen miles of corridors. There are ten radial hallways between the rings, and they say a person can make it between any two random points inside a maximum seven minutes, which was presumably calculated with reference to the army's official quick- march pace of four miles an hour, which meant if I was running hard I could be anywhere within about three minutes. But where? I could find a broom closet and steal bag lunches and hold out a day or two, but that would be all. Or I could take hostages and try to argue my case, but I had never seen that kind of thing succeed.

So I waited.

The DPS guy in front of me on my right said, "Sir, you be sure and have a nice day now," and then he moved past me, and his partner moved past me on my other side, both of them just strolling slow, two guys happy to be out in the air, patrolling, varying their viewpoint. Maybe not so dumb after all. They were doing their jobs and following their plan. They had tried to decoy me into a small locked room, but they had failed, no harm, no foul, so now they were turning the page straight to plan B. They would wait until I was inside and the doors were closed, and then they would jump into crowd control mode, dispersing the incoming people, keeping them safe in case shots had to be fired inside. I assumed the lobby glass was supposed to be bulletproof, but the smart money never bets on the DoD having gotten exactly what it paid for.

The door was right in front of me. It was open. I took a breath and stepped into the lobby. Sometimes if you want to know for sure whether the stove is hot, the only way to find out is to touch it.

Chapter 2

The woman with the perfume and the pale hands was already deep into the corridor beyond the open turnstile. She had been waved through. Straight ahead of me was the two-man inquiry desk. To my left were the two guys checking badges. The open turnstile was between their hips. The four spare guys were still doing nothing beyond it. They were still clustered together, quiet and watchful, like an independent team. I still couldn't see their shoes.

I took another breath and stepped up to the counter.

Like a lamb to the slaughter.

The desk guy on the left looked at me and said, "Yes, sir." Fatigue and resignation in his voice. A response, not a question, as if I had already spoken. He looked young and reasonably smart. Genuine DPS, presumably. MP Warrant Officers are quick studies, but they wouldn't be running a Pentagon inquiry desk, however deeply under they were supposed to be.

The desk guy looked at me again, expectantly, and I said, "I have a twelve o'clock appointment."

"Who with?"

"Colonel Frazer," I said.

The guy made out like he didn't recognize the name. The world's largest office building. Thirty thousand people. He leafed through a book the size of a telephone directory and asked, "Would that be Colonel John James Frazer? Senate Liaison?"

I said, "Yes."

Or: Guilty as charged.

Way to my left the four spare guys were watching me. But not moving. Yet.

The guy at the desk didn't ask my name. Partly because he had been briefed, presumably, and shown photographs, and partly because my Class A uniform included my name on a nameplate, worn as per regulations on my right breast pocket flap, exactly centered, its upper edge exactly a quarter of an inch below the top seam.

Seven letters: REACHER.

Or, eleven letters: Arrest me now.

The guy at the inquiry desk said, "Colonel John James Frazer is in 3C315. You know how to get there?"

I said, "Yes." Third floor, C ring, nearest to radial corridor number three, bay number fifteen. The Pentagon's version of map coordinates, which it needed, given that it covered twenty-nine whole acres of floor space.

The guy said, "Sir, you have a great day," and his guileless gaze moved past my shoulder to the next in line. I stood still for a moment. They were tying it up with a bow. They were making it perfect. The general common law test for criminal culpability is expressed by the Latin actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea, which means, roughly, doing things won't necessarily get you in trouble unless you actually mean to do them. Action plus intention is the standard. They were waiting for me to prove my intention. They were waiting for me to step through the turnstile and into the labyrinth. Which explained why the four spare guys were on their side of the gate, not mine. Crossing the line would make it real. Maybe there were jurisdiction issues. Maybe lawyers had been consulted. Frazer wanted my ass gone for sure, but he wanted his own ass covered just as much.

I took another breath and crossed the line and made it real. I walked between the two badge checkers and squeezed between the cold alloy flanks of the turnstile. The bar was retracted. There was nothing to hit with my thighs. I stepped out on the far side and paused. The four spare guys were on my right. I looked at their shoes. Army regulations are surprisingly vague about shoes. Plain black lace-up oxfords or close equivalents, conservative, no designs on them, minimum of three pairs of eyelets, closed toe, maximum two-inch heel. That's all the fine print says. The four guys on my right were all in compliance, but they weren't wearing cop shoes. Not like the two guys outside. They were sporting four variations on the same classic theme. High shines, tight laces, a little creasing and wear here and there. Maybe they were genuine DPS. Maybe they weren't. No way of telling. Not right then.

I was looking at them, and they were looking at me, but no one spoke. I looped around them and headed deeper into the building. I used the E ring counterclockwise and turned left at the first radial hallway.

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The Affair (Jack Reacher Series #16) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 642 reviews.
enticed More than 1 year ago
As others have said, Lee Child is a superb craftsman of suspense. Can't wait to read more.
Molinarolo More than 1 year ago
As a fan of the Jack Reacher Series, THE AFFAIR was ok; not good, but not bad. Lee Child takes the reader back to 1997 when our intrepid loner was still an Army MP on an undercover assignment to Carter Crossing, Mississippi. His assignment is to make nice with local law enforcement and relay what they know to his superiors. A young beautiful woman has been murdered. Her throat slit. Her bloodless body left in an alley. Her suspected killer, a solder stationed at the nearby base. A soldier who has powerful friends in Washington, D.C. Reacher has no trouble making nice to Elizabeth Devereaux. She is the county Sheriff and a former Marine MP and has linked Janice Mae Chapman's killing to two other dead beauties that the soldier dated. Ever loyal to the Army, Jack Reacher knows that this case will be his last. He will not participate in a cover up to protect one soldier. While the story is good, the telling gets tedious. Child repeats the 1997 references too often. Normally the reader gets up close to the serial killer and sees his or her psychology. We don't get that here with the exception of the destroyed car. We do see, but not fully understand the puppet-master of the cover-up. The Washington ties to the soldier are strong, but would Pentagon Officers really go the extremes as Child wrote to protect one soldier? I think not. And some of Reacher's actions didn't ring true to his character, but the beginning and ending are very strong as well as the character development: finally a strong female that mirrors Jack. The midnight train and tracks become characters as well as strong suspense devices. But true Jack Reacher fans will ignore the flaws of the novel because of the good story THE AFFAIR is.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1997 in Carter Crossing, Mississippi someone slashes the throat of twentyish Janice May Chapman by an isolated railroad track. The Pentagon is concerned that evidence points to a Ranger training in nearby Fort Kelham committed the homicide as Captain Reed Riley has connections as his father Carleton is chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee. Colonel Garber assigns military police officer Major Jack Reacher to go undercover to learn the truth and keep the local sheriff Elizabeth Deveraux under control without her knowing it. Each distrusts the other but soon need to protect each other's back from a dangerous cover-up as the military are uninterested in the facts; their preference is for a local hillbilly to take the rap. However, Reacher becomes incompliant when he learns Janice is the third female to have been killed by this slasher. The latest Reacher thriller (see Worth Dying For) is an exciting throwback tale to when the heroic vigilante was still in the Army. Ironically though going back to the case that led to his leaving the military, there is not much new added to the Reacher mythos. Still the story line is fast-paced and filled with action as Reacher learns what happens to officers doing their duty with personal courage vs. those with DC connections. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Worth every penny. Had me thinking at every turn. Jack reacher is a one og a kind man. Wish more like him truly existed. The plot is excellent and insights into the military complications that exist. Deveraux is a top notch addition. Hate to see her fade away.
LOVETOREAD16 More than 1 year ago
"The Affair" is an intriguing story of Reacher's last mission in the Army and a peek backwards remembering the past, the reluctant hero. There is action but not quite as rough as past experiences as he lands in a small town in Mississippi at an army post where he meets the stunning chief of police. This was an enjoyable and exciting ride. I recommend!
KenCady More than 1 year ago
A run of the mill novel which will disappoint legions of Jack Reacher fans who are used to much more. The first half of the book is tedious. The second half has the action, but credibility is so strained that the reader has a hard time buying it. I didn't get a free advance copy, nor did I need to sully the review pages because I didn't like the NOOK price. The Barnes & Noble review is quickly becoming a thing of little value because B&N refuses to police its review pages. Right now we'd need a Reacher for that.
2cquarterhorses More than 1 year ago
This is a typical fast paced Reacher thriller. The story is interesting and moves along quickly and I highly recommend it to anyone who loves a good mystery. I've been a huge fan since I read The Killing Floor when it was first released and haven't been disappointed by any of the subsequent books. Give it a try and become hooked on Jack Reacher!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved how easy it was to read & I really liked the characters
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Going into this "pre" Reacher novel, i was quite nervous and worried i would fail to enjoy a trip down Jack's memory lane i worried for nothing In fact i enjoyed The Affair more than many recent Reacher novels.
SanBrunoMom More than 1 year ago
I have always been a fan of this series. My favorite was The Enemy, the prequel to the series which was actually the 8th book that came out. I am looking forward to reading The Affair since I have always wanted to see Jack Reacher fall in love, really fall in love. And my long standing question for Lee Child is - when will Jack fall in love true enough to settle down? The five star rating is for all the books in the series.
xxcarrier More than 1 year ago
This book was ok, but not Lee Child's best by any means. The shallow plot, weak motive, and inaccuracies of basic military knowledge -a major does not wear silver oak leaves, for example- suggest that he needs a more critical editor. I enjoyed most of the books in the Reacher series, but Lee Child's latest books have been getting progressively weaker. I will continue to read his books as long as he writes them, but he needs to get back to the substance of his first few books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lee Child's hero Jack Reacher is still the best out none!
silencedogoodreturns More than 1 year ago
After a few comic-bookish, silly and pondering novels, this one by Mr Childs reconnects with all that is good with Jack Reacher. A very entertaining read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Child's Jack Reacher novels are the best!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All of the Reacher books are page turners. I love the series and can not wait for the next Reacher book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read all the Reacher novels. This one was a disappointment. It replaces Echo Burning at the bottom of the pile. Was this the same author who wrote Gone Tomorrow? and Die Trying? I thought The Enemy set the stage for all to follow. This one could close the curtain. I was so ready for the next saga which I hoped he was heading for Virginia and this is what came forth. So I will wait yet again. A reader who starts with the Affair as their first Reacher novel will most likely stop there.
Richard Eib More than 1 year ago
This story should have been left in the Army files as "Top-Secret eyes only". If read all Jack Reacher and liked all. This one was disappointing. Not knowing how Reacher's career ended was better then knowing.
SAArturo More than 1 year ago
Really enjoyed this book. Have read all of the Reacher series and this one helps you to understand Reacher.
STORE NOOKUSER More than 1 year ago
It was an amazing story
James Howard More than 1 year ago
bedesheart More than 1 year ago
I got confused at the end as Childs tried to cram too many explanations in too little space. Hard to follow and to make it all fall in place logically.
AndyAC More than 1 year ago
As someone else said, I thought that by now I'd be sick of Jack Reacher, but not so. Lee Child keeps revealing different facets of the man's character and, each book, and I'm going through them all having somehow just discovered him, is a really terrific story. "The Affair" is no exception. It answers many questions about the main character, but again, adds new clues to his personality. This one, as all the others, keeps you up at night reading -- thank you Lee Child for some very good entertainment.
daniele christensen More than 1 year ago
Love reacher!
hookemhornsJA More than 1 year ago
Reads like an author on a deadline, trying to force out some sort of story. Long, rambling digressions into meaningless areas, contrived, implausible plot... I typically love the Jack Reacher novels, but it was all I could do not to put this one down and walk away. This was seriously 4 hours of my life that I wish I had back.
Capri142 More than 1 year ago
I rarely write reviews. It seems like others do a much better job of it that I do. This was one book that I just had to say something about though. First off I have been a big Lee Child fan since the first Reacher book came out some time ago. He always delivers a good read but with The Affair he out did himself. I finished this book almost in one read.....used up the better part of A Friday night as well. The story takes back to Reacher's last days in the Army. The suspense builds from page one and never lets up. A really good read! Be prepared to lose a bit of sleep, It is a hard book to put down