The Afghan [NOOK Book]

Overview

When British and American intelligence discover an al Qaeda operation in the works, they enlist undercover imposter Colonel Mike Martin to pass himself off as Taliban commander Izmat Khan. But nothing prepares Martin for the dark and shifting world into which he is about to enter-or the terrible things he will find there.


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The Afghan

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Overview

When British and American intelligence discover an al Qaeda operation in the works, they enlist undercover imposter Colonel Mike Martin to pass himself off as Taliban commander Izmat Khan. But nothing prepares Martin for the dark and shifting world into which he is about to enter-or the terrible things he will find there.


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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
This espionage novel is ripped from the headlines. Drawing on real events connected with the July 2005 London subway bombing, The Afghan conjures up a pulse-raising tale of plots and counter-plots. When leaders of the United States and the United Kingdom uncover the outlines of a massive al Qaeda attack plan, they attempt a risky substitution: Colonel Mike Martin, a resourceful British operative, is sent into the Taliban hornet nest to ferret out the details of the terrorist assault.
Library Journal
American and British intelligence services discover that al Qaeda is planning something major and horrific that will likely occur somewhere in the United States. However, since neither country has operatives on the inside, they have no idea what or where. Enter retired British army Col. Mike Martin, who first appeared in Forsyth's The Fist of God. Martin's job is to assume the identity of an imprisoned Taliban member and infiltrate al Qaeda. This is plausible because he is lean, dark-complexioned, of part-Indian descent, and was raised in Iran. Martin becomes the titular Afghan and begins a dangerous and frightening journey toward discovering what appalling act the terrorists are planning and putting a stop to it. Typical of Forsyth's work (e.g., The Day of the Jackal and Avenger), this is a tense story of technology vs. evil, the latter in this case a mind-numbing degree of fanaticism. Even though it starts slowly, it builds to an exciting climax that makes the read well worth it. Recommended. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/15/06.]-Robert Conroy, Warren, MI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The Forsyth Formula, al-Qaeda version: A sort of post-9/11 apocalyptic western, this thriller pits White Guys against Black Turbans, the daring forces of freedom versus the jihadi doers of evil. Should Hasbro ever decide it needs a new G.I. Joe, Mike Martin's their man. The latest action figure from the Forsyth franchise (Avenger, 2003, etc.), he's a craggy Scot summoned from a wee bit of rest and relaxation at his Hampshire retreat back into the endless global fray. The listening department of Pakistan's Counter-Terrorism Center has, through cell-phone surveillance, unearthed a plot. One of Osama bin Laden's financiers has already, clutching his laptop, hurled himself from a balustrade to protect the plans. Hi-tech British cunning retrieves the info, which reveals schemes for "Al Isra," the biggest potential attack yet. To penetrate al-Qaeda, U.K./U.S. intelligence makes a mole of Martin, passing him off as Izmat Khan, ex-Taliban bigwig serving time in Gitmo. Mirror images of each other, the men are archetypal warriors, Khan a stoic Afghan outraged by the Russian invasion of his country and conned by desperation into bin Laden's service, Martin a 25-year veteran of killing missions-the Falklands, the Balkans, the Middle East. Plus, passing for Khan is easy for multilingual Martin, son of an oil-company executive stationed in Iraq. He even looks the part: "olive-skinned, black-haired and eyed, lean and very hard of physique." Martin's mission earns him martyrdom, but only after all kinds of derring-do involving a ship called The Countess of Richmond, characters screaming "Eject, eject!" and a cameo appearance by John Negroponte. Gun-club porn-packed with stodgily accurate descriptions ofweapons and acronymic slang. Hardly subtle, just bang-bang galore. First printing of 250,000
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101211168
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 8/22/2006
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 51,140
  • File size: 552 KB

Meet the Author

Frederick Forsyth is the author of fourteen novels and short story collections, from 1971's The Day of the Jackal to 2003's Avenger. A former pilot and print and television reporter, he has had five movies made from his works, and a television miniseries.


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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 49 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 16, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Operation Crowbar I have a predisposition to love the books of

    Operation Crowbar

    I have a predisposition to love the books of Frederick Forsyth as he wrote one of my favorite books of all time: The Day of the Jackal. I would've given this story five stars as well, except for a VERY convenient coincidence that happens in about the middle of the book. I won't spoil it, but it really shocked me how out of place it felt, not to mention unnecessary. It just seemed so stunningly unrealistic compared to the authenticity of the rest of the book, but I got over it.

    Forsyth is a master at spitting out details in a suspenseful way that really grabs me. It feels real, like a good Michael Mann movie. I like being in the hands of competent authors, and he is certainly that. Definitely recommended.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 21, 2011

    forsyth does it again!

    i don't know where this man gets his info but he's done his homework again. i very informative 'text' written in novel form about the history and culture of the mideast mixing with the west. character development was a bit soddened with perhaps too much background info but entertaining, nonetheless. this is a heavy subject not to be taken lightly. in drawing parallels, not intended by the author, one can see the mismatched arab cultures, vastness of religion and translations of the holy koran - not too dissimilar to the holy bible of christianity and the terrible things christians did to each other and the outsiders not too far ago. the christians did less than holy things to others - just like what's happening with islam today. a definite read - especially to those who think they know (but do not - really!).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2011

    Good Read for Current Times - I Recommend

    It took a couple of chapters to get "into" the story and where it was going. It likely provided some insight into the anonomous and edicated life of the Navy Selas and was a good plot and story.

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  • Posted March 13, 2011

    Not up to his standards

    Forsyth became the permier action/adventure writer with "Day of the Jackel" and followed it up with the exciting "Odessa File." He's been coasting since then. This title shows his penchant for detail without bogging the story line down, but it lacks the tension of those two works. You never connect with the characters and the ending is a let down.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I found this to be the page burnner I heard about.

    This book was filled with very believable characters whit very human flaws. The book is filled with suspence because the antaginist and portaginist both are not super humans. And it show that all the high-tech support is only as good as the person in control. This stor goes int detail how ruthless the bad guys can be and in the blink of an eye, they could win.

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  • Posted August 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Another masterpiece from Mr. Forsyth

    In yet another wonderful book, Mr. Forsyth covers international terrorism at its best. In this book, British and American intelligence agencies receive a terrible message: an Al-Qaeda strike is imminent. But they have no clue when, where and who will cause the strike. There is no clear clue. Security authorities do not have sources of information inside Osama bin Laden's organization. It is impossible to infiltrate someone from the western hemisphere, unless...
    Izmat Khan is an afghan and he is a high official from the Taliban. He has been held at Guantanamo prison for five years. Colonel Mike Martin is a veteran with 25 year experience at the most dangerous war places in the world. He is a British official, born and raised in Iraq. In a try to avoid the attack, the intelligence services will try what nobody ever thought about doing: they will try to make Mike Martin impersonate Izmat Khan. If ou are picky, you will find minor flaws on how Mike is examined by the Taliban guys to find out if he really is Izmat or if he is lying... but generally speaking, this is another masterpiece from the master of suspense. If you like to read in the edge of your seat, this is the book you cannot miss in your permanent library. It took me around 13 hours to read this book. I give it a 5 stars.

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  • Posted July 25, 2009

    Don't miss it!!

    This is an exciting, stimulating, adventurous book, written by an outstanding writer - one of my very favorite authors. He writes lucidly and well and avoids the usual foul language and sex-drenched scenes so common to this genre. You will not want to put this one down. And, perhaps, one day you'll want to read it again. He's that good.

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  • Posted March 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Forsyth does it again!

    After so many years, Frederick Forsyth still has that magic that leads to escapism. A most convoluted story line, but believable, well executed - and a thrill a minute.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2007

    Sad Decline

    Forsythe practically defined the genre with The Day of the Jackal and the Odessa File.Sadly, his last couple of nevels don't quite measure up overall. The Afghan was well researched and frankly, put much of the current events of that region into perspective for me. The plot was disjointed and the technique of having multiple events taking place and dovetailing at the end was unwieldly and hard to follow.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2006

    Just skip to the last 20 pages of the book.

    3/4 of this book is about the middle east people, with names that you cannot pronounce, that are mentioned in the book, but are not in the book. Make sense? It didn't to me either! It is a hard read, even if you can make it to the end of the book, it's not a happy ending.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2007

    Very well written book

    Forsyth has renewed. He shows a lot of understanding to the Afghans and Arabs and criticizes Americans and English alike. The end was not happy but the book is well worth reading.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2006

    Worth Reading

    This was my first Forsyth novel and it didn't disappoint. While the actual plot seems to take a backseat to the character development that consumes the first half of the story, it was the backstory that I found most interesting. A few over the top, unbelievable events threatened to ruin it for me but didn't. All in all, worth reading for the way it weaves fact and fiction.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2006

    A lot less than I expected

    I am used to awaiting Forsyth's new releases. One of my favourite writers, indeed. Sometimes I get a little disappointed, as it happened this time. As usual, the plot is defying and intricate. But the book is flabby, the end is an anticlimax and, frankly, that F-15 thing was the worst 'McGuffin' I've ever seen. Anyway, Mr. Forsyth's still miles ahead of, say, Ludlum. Keep writing, and I'll keep reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2006

    Not vintage Forsyth

    I am a big fan of Fredrick Forsyth and was counting down days to buy this new release. Forsyth's 'Fist of God' is one of the masterpieces just like his 'Day of the Jackal'. In particular Fist of God is fabulous because it created an adernaline pumping mystery around a war that was in most parts unevenetful. Given his mastery of this medium I was expecting Forsyth to give me the best read of all times now that he had a subject as riveting as Al Qaeda terrorism to write about. As I started reading the book I was in fact elated to see the return of the Martin brothers (the heroes of Fist of God). However Mr. Forsyth lets us down. His portrayal of detail and his unparallel knowledge of the locales, characters and intelligence agency structures not withstanding, the book does not seem riveting. The plot seems not as interesting as those from his previous books. The action seems to get predictable and mundane. The end was a let down. I was just hoping for so much more. There are also some errors. Karachi is in Sindh not Baluchistan for example. There were other errors too about some references from Pakistan. Coming from any other author, I would not have had any higher expectations but not from the great Fredrick Forsyth. I am hoping that Mr. Forsyth reads the reviews of his readers and if so I would like to request that he write another book on the Al Qaeda terror theme which reminds us of vintage Forsyth

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2006

    Confusing and Boring

    Have read most of the reviews on this book and I agree: Forsyth has turned out some great books in the past. This is not one of them. Confusing names, places. Not worth going to the last part to see how it ends. I gave up two-thirds of the way through.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2006

    Read this novel and worry.....

    If you do not understand what is reality in Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan or Lebanon, read this book. It is an eye-opener on how soon the world will be totally dominated by Islam and its various factions (Al-Queda, Hezbollah, etc). I will not, hopefully in my lfetime, see the free world crumble under the thumb of Islam. The novel is, again, Frederick Forsyth at his very best, fact/fiction splendidly mixed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2006

    Forsythe getting a bit tired these days

    The book brings back an old Forsythe character - Mike Martin, British SAS and paratroops officer who can pass for anything from an arab to an afghan because he had a grandmother from India and resembles her, and moreover was brought up in Iraq, among Iraqi kids, speaking fluent arabic. So now he has to pose as a Taliban fighter who is cooped up in Gitmo, and who - coincidentially enough, he fought alongside in their war against the russians (where the afghans were the heroic underdogs and the CIA was eager to press stinger missiles and such on them.. remember that Rambo movie?) - even saved the man's life. Oh, and met a very young pair of future Al Qaeda leaders, Osama bin Laden and Ayman Al Zawahiri, while he was at it. Some people have all the luck - while authors have deus ex machina, which works very well when they run out of luck. That Forsythe has to string so many coincidences together - Mike Martin would meet the guy he is supposed to impersonate, and also meet OBL so that he can remind him of that meeting decades later and prove his identity .. and then get drafted onto the very mission he's supposed to prevent. Well - that mission involves that usual and classic Forsythe plot device, the bait and switch (for example, in The Fourth Protocol, the russian spy finds a dead man of fairly similar background and gets himself an ID matching the dead man ..). This time its something that looks a bit harder to steal than a simple ID .. and it is aimed at a bunch of people catching all of whom together would be OBL's wet dream. Fine - Martin pulls it off, and sacrifices himself heroically doing so .. ensuring that we aren't going to be treated to a sequel in some future conflict where he appears to save the day. Embedded into the story like currants into a bun is Forsythe's usual minute attention to detail .. an org chart of US / UK security agencies, and a dissertation on the extremist and perverted religious beliefs that make a terrorist [no, not a fundamentalist - that's different, as Forsythe points out]. Oh well - it is worth a read if you're on a long plane ride. But it is not the kind of page turner that I remember Forsythe for. Better by a long chalk than the rest of the 'competition' in 9/11 and AQ themed thrillers though .. FF hasn't lost his touch altogether, and most of the wannabe thriller authors never had a touch in the first place.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2006

    Vintage Forsyth

    Good thriller read. While the book digressed a bit off the main plotline at times, I didn't mind because the digressions were about interesting real historical and political details.THE AFGHAN is a fabulous espionage thriller that grips the audience from the very start.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2006

    Terrible

    Honestly, forsyth is probably the worst author in my opinion. He shouldn't encourage stereotyping. Just the title pretty much says if you're Afghan or middle eastern, you're a terrorist. Some people are just really stupid.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2006

    Out of the seat thriller

    The Afghan is a very well tailored book by Frederick Forsythe. The story revolves around the title of the book through out and does not stray out of the subject at all. The background of the 2 main characters of Izmat Khan and Col. Mike Martin are very well handled drawing the full stop wherever needed. Also, there is never a dull moment. It keeps the reader glued on to the book till the end. A must buy

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