African American Activists

African American Activists

by Carol Ellis
     
 

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The Civil War finally ended slavery in the United States in 1865. But blacks didn't suddenly enjoy all the rights other Americans took for granted. They had to struggle against racism and discrimination to claim those rights. African-American Activists traces that generations-long struggle.

In this book, you'll meet early activists like Booker T. Washington and W

Overview

The Civil War finally ended slavery in the United States in 1865. But blacks didn't suddenly enjoy all the rights other Americans took for granted. They had to struggle against racism and discrimination to claim those rights. African-American Activists traces that generations-long struggle.

In this book, you'll meet early activists like Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois, who had very different ideas about how blacks should take their place in American society. You'll read about activists who worked for integration and equality under the law during the civil rights movement, including Rosa Parks and John Lewis. And you'll learn how a new generation of African-American activists, such as Majora Carter and Van Jones, continue to work for a better society today.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Suzanne Tobin
Part of the series, "Major Black Contributions from Emancipation to Civil Rights," this book gives a succinct overview of civil rights activists from 1863 to 2009. Among the six chapters, two stand out. In "Cooperate or Fight," the late 19th and early 20th century debate within the black community contrasts Booker T. Washington's "Atlanta Compromise" proposal—that blacks be given access to education and economic opportunity, but not demand full civil rights—versus NAACP cofounder W.E.B. DuBois' assertion that blacks must strive for full equal rights with whites. In "Strike and Boycott," lesser-known activists are highlighted, giving them their due. One of these was Claudette Colvin, a fifteen-year-old Montgomery, Alabama, resident who refused to give up her seat to a white passenger. Nine months later in December 1955, Rosa Parks' same refusal led to the 381-day Montgomery Bus Boycott, which ended bus segregation. Another was Barbara Johns, a sixteen-year-old who led students to boycott "colored" Robert Russa Moton High School in Farmville, Virginia in 1954, to protest its poor conditions. The NAACP combined Moton's case with four others into Brown v. Board of Education. In 1954, the Supreme Court declared "separate but equal" to be unconstitutional. Pictures of leaders or seminal events are included on nearly every double-page spread. While a film strip-type border along the bottom of many pages is designed to graphically unite the books in the series, it could be distracting to the reader, especially since it includes some people that are not included in this volume. Readers interested in more than a broad-brush view of this struggle can delve deeper by exploring the sources found in chapter notes, the chronology from 1863 to 1988, a twelve item glossary, further reading recommendations, and Internet resources. A two-page index is also included. Reviewer: Suzanne Tobin

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422223710
Publisher:
Mason Crest Publishers
Publication date:
04/28/2012
Series:
Major Black Contributions from Emancipation to Civil Rights Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
7.47(w) x 9.39(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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