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African-American Artists

Overview

From quilts to marble, from comic strips to welded steel, African Americans have created exciting works of art for more than a hundred years. African-American Artists traces the struggles and shows the work of many of these men and women. This book will introduce you to Harriet Powers, who was born a slave and who told legends and stories on her quilts. You'll meet Horace Pippin, who taught himself to paint and kept painting even after he lost the use of his arm. Cartoonist Aaron McGruder and digital artist ...

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African American Artists

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Overview

From quilts to marble, from comic strips to welded steel, African Americans have created exciting works of art for more than a hundred years. African-American Artists traces the struggles and shows the work of many of these men and women. This book will introduce you to Harriet Powers, who was born a slave and who told legends and stories on her quilts. You'll meet Horace Pippin, who taught himself to paint and kept painting even after he lost the use of his arm. Cartoonist Aaron McGruder and digital artist Angela Perkins are among the African-American artists who continue to enrich the nation's culture today.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
"Major Black Contributions from Emancipation to Civil Rights" describes this series highlighting African-American successes in many fields, including sports, politics, science, education, and art. Ellis explains that, after emancipation, many talented African-American artists began to be recognized. One of the first was Edward Bannister, who won first prize at the 1876 Centennial Art Exhibit for his pastoral painting of cows under oak trees. Another exhibitor was Edmonia Lewis with her marble statue of a dying Cleopatra (lost for many years, now in the Smithsonian). Harriet Powers, born into slavery, designed intricately beautiful quilts, shown today in two major museums. After World War I, as African-Americans moved north, new artists emerged: Horace Pippin was a talented folk artist, while Augusta Savage became a renowned sculptor and teacher in Harlem. During the 1920s, the Harlem Renaissance encouraged many black artists, like Aaron Douglas with his bold Art Deco paintings, and Jacob Lawrence, who used bright colors and patterned shapes to paint panels about African-American life (shown is his painting of readers in a Harlem library). Younger artists included Gordon Parks, photographer and film-maker, and Romare Bearden, who produced stunning prints combining photography and collage. (Readers can admire a photo of his vivid ceramic-tile portrait of his ancestors.) Today, African-American artists work in all media—Faith Ringgold makes painted quilts to tell stories (Tar Beach was a 1991 Caldecott Honor Book), sculptor Richard Hunt works in metal to make huge abstract public art, while Jerry Craft and Aaron McGruder draw the cartoons, Mama's Boyz and Boondocks. These creators can be inspiring to young artists; their work is vital to understanding African-American participation in our country's culture. Readers can discover more in Mike Venezia's Ringgold (Children's Press, 2008) or Jan Greenberg's Romare Bearden: Collage of Memories (Abrams, 2003). Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Introduction Dr. Marc Lamont Hill 6

1 Forever Free 9

2 After the War 19

3 The Image Makers 29

4 Changing Times 37

5 Metal, Paper and Computers 47

Chapter Notes 54

Chronology 57

Glossary 59

Further Reading 60

Internet Resources 61

Index 62

Contributors 64

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