African American Musicians

African American Musicians

by Eleanora E. Tate, Jim Haskins
     
 

Much of American music really started out as African American music. Gospel, spirituals, ragtime, blues, jazz, rock and roll, and hip-hop?all were born in black neighborhoods, created by African Americans who drew on their culture, their aspirations, and their talent. In this spirited collection, you'll meet more than thirty African Americans who have forever changed… See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Much of American music really started out as African American music. Gospel, spirituals, ragtime, blues, jazz, rock and roll, and hip-hop?all were born in black neighborhoods, created by African Americans who drew on their culture, their aspirations, and their talent. In this spirited collection, you'll meet more than thirty African Americans who have forever changed America's musical landscape. Jazz composers and stride pianists, concert singers and horn players, gospel and rap artists?all overcame obstacles of racism, segregation, and personal tragedy to lead the evolution of American music. Their inspirational stories, from before the Civil War to the present, reveal how:
Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, born a slave, became the first black concert singer. She was known around the world as the "African Nightingale" and the "Black Swan" for her amazing voice.W. C. Handy conquered poverty to become a great cornet player and the composer of the "Memphis Blues", the first popular blues song to be published.
Paul Robeson, a son of a former slave, became an All-American football player, his class valedictorian, a Columbia law graduate, a human rights activist, and a world-famous interpreter of spirituals. Duke Ellington, elegant painter turned pianist, composed thousands of songs, led an award-winning orchestra, and influenced every major jazz, blues, and big band musician today. Aretha Franklin, the "Queen of Soul," survived personal tragedy to win more Grammies than any other woman and became the first woman to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Full of tales of courage, talent, and determination, this information-packed book illuminates these and other unforgettable musical stars, including Marian Anderson, Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson, and Queen Latifah.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Children's Literature
This collection portrays the struggles of talented African American musicians against racism and segregation in order to pursue their art. Included are pre-civil war musicians, musicians during the Civil War and Reconstruction era, the early 20th century and modern day musicians, including rap artists. Some are singers, others are composers or play instruments but they all draw on their culture and environment to present their artistic talent. One of the early, less known artists, was Millie-Christine McCoy, Siamese twins, who performed before Queen Victoria. She was so impressed with them that she gave each a pair of matching diamond brooches. A recent book Millie-Christine Fearfully and Wonderfully Made covers the exploitation of her life rather than the musical talent that she had. (They considered themselves as one being.) The author of this book focuses on the contribution that she made through her talent rather than how she was physically different. Besides many of the well-known musicians such as Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Marian Anderson and Aretha Franklin there are lesser-known talents included. Thomas Andrew Dorsey, a gospel song writer, Doug and Frankie Quimby of the "Hambone Song," Francis Hall Johnson of the Hall Johnson Choir and Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, one of the earliest African American to enter the American scene as a classical singer. 2000, John Wiley & Sons Inc., Ages 10 to 14, $22.95. Reviewer: Leila Toledo—Children's Literature
This book showcases twenty-seven African American musicians from the early nineteenth to the late twentieth centuries. In addition to familiar names such as Scott Joplin, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Aretha Franklin, and Michael Jackson, several lesser known but significant figures are featured, including Millie-Christine McCoy, Francis Hall Johnson, and Doug and Frankie Quimby. Numerous sidebars highlight other important musicians. An interesting and readable survey of how great musicians shaped popular American music. Part of the "Black Stars" series. 2000, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., $22.95. Ages 10 to 12. Reviewer: G. Henebry SOURCE: Parent Council Volume 8
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-This collective biography presents performers from the early 1800s (Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield) to the present day (Queen Latifah). Many genres and skills are represented from spirituals, gospel, ragtime, blues, jazz, and soul. Scott Joplin, Marian Anderson, Duke Ellington, and Aretha Franklin are here as well as Michael Jackson and a few lesser-known individuals. Each entry includes a black-and-white photo or reproduction and sidebars on pertinent topics. This is a good overview that gives enough information to inspire further study on individual musicians.-Janet Woodward, Garfield High School, Seattle, WA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471253563
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
05/28/2000
Series:
Black Stars Series, #11
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
7.66(w) x 9.59(h) x 0.65(d)
Lexile:
1130L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >