African American Women Scientists and Inventors

African American Women Scientists and Inventors

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by Otha Richard Sullivan
     
 

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Meet African american women of science and invention from the early years to modern Times

Patricia Bath, M.D.
Miriam E. Benjamin Ursula Burns Alexa Canady, M.D.
Jewel Plummer Cobb, Ph.D.
Ellen F. Eglin Angela D. Ferguson, M.D.
Sara E. Goode Evelyn Boyd Granville, Ph.D.
Dannellia Gladden Green, Ph.D.
Bessie Blount Griffin Betty Wright Harris,

Overview

Meet African american women of science and invention from the early years to modern Times

Patricia Bath, M.D.
Miriam E. Benjamin Ursula Burns Alexa Canady, M.D.
Jewel Plummer Cobb, Ph.D.
Ellen F. Eglin Angela D. Ferguson, M.D.
Sara E. Goode Evelyn Boyd Granville, Ph.D.
Dannellia Gladden Green, Ph.D.
Bessie Blount Griffin Betty Wright Harris, Ph.D.
Shirley Ann Jackson, Ph.D.
Aprille Joy Ericsson Jackson, Ph.D.
Mae Jemison, M.D.
Marjorie Stewart Joyner, Ph.D.
Mary Kenner Reatha Clark King, Ph.D.
Annie Turnbo Malone Mildred Austin Smith Valerie Thomas Madame C. J. Walker Jane Cooke Wright, M.D.
Roger Arliner Young, Ph.D.
Chavonda J. Jacobs Young, Ph.D.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Author Sullivan has compiled twenty-six short biographical sketches of mostly little known African American women scientists and inventors. The book is divided into three parts: The Early Years, Into the New Century, and Modern Times. Women such as Mae Jemison, the first African American woman to fly into space and Alexa Canady, a pediatric neurosurgeon are highlighted. Others are Betty Wright Harris, a chemist who works in the field of nuclear weapons, and Marjorie Stewart Joyner who invented a permanent-wave machine. There are sidebars throughout the book that relate to the womens' work. In the first chapter, a sketch on Ellen Eglin, an inventor of a clothes-wringer in the 1880s, is given. However, the sidebar, which talks about The Spirit of Invention, mentions a man Benjamin Banneker. This is the only exeption; the rest of the book deals with the achievements of women. Beside the original twenty-six women, other, shorter biographical sketches are given. There are black and white drawings of some of the inventions and photographs of the women. There is also a sidebar that lists the notable firsts for African American Women Doctors. A chronology and bibliography are also included. This is a nice book about the achievements of African American women. 2002, John Wiley and Sons, $22.95. Ages 10 up. Reviewer: Della A. Yannuzzi
School Library Journal
Gr 7-10-This companion to Sullivan's African American Inventors (Wiley, 1998) profiles 26 women, beginning with Ellen F. Eglin, who was born in 1849 and invented a clothes-wringer, and concluding with Chavonda J. Jacobs Young, who was born in 1967 and has been a research scientist and professor. There is some crossover between the two titles. The introduction discusses the lack of information on the contributions of African-American women and the historical reasons for it. Each brief biography describes the subject's background and achievements, and, in some cases, the obstacles that she had to overcome. Coverage ranges from well-known individuals, such as Madame C. J. Walker, to the lesser known, such as Miriam E. Benjamin, who patented a gong-and-signal chair that was used in the U.S. House of Representatives. When available, black-and-white pictures have been included, as well as photographs and or drawings of certain inventions. This much-needed book is a fine supplement to units on inventors and inventions, and would be useful in multicultural studies.-Maren Ostergard, Bellevue Regional Library, WA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781118466391
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
06/05/2012
Series:
Black Stars Series
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
700,801
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

OTHA RICHARD SULLIVAN, Ed.D., is a former science teacher and middle school guidance counselor. As head of Detroit's program to infuse African American history into the public school curriculum, he instructed teachers on how to incorporate African American scientific history into their classes. He is also the author of African American Inventors (Wiley).

JIM HASKINS has written more than one hundred books for young readers, including African American Entrepreneurs (Wiley); his collaboration with Rosa Parks on her autobiography, Rosa Parks: My Story; and Black Eagles: African Americans in Aviation. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Washington Post Children's Book Guild Award for the body of his work, and the Coretta Scott King Book Award.

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African American Women Scientists and Inventors 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book. Not only is it packed with interesting facts, but the interviews and writing style are so personal and intimate that one feels as if, for example, Mae Jemison is right in the room sharing her life story. The women are candid about the obstacles they met and overcame. I think a young adult of any race will find this book very inspiring...I know if it had been around when I was a kid, science and math would have been much more relevent to me!