African Americans During Reconstruction

Overview

The end of the Civil War was a hopeful beginning for African Americans. Although President Lincoln left no definite plan for reconstruction, many Americans supported one, and the Reconstruction Act of 1867 was eventually passed. African Americans were given the right to vote, and the South was given assistance to rebuild itself. With Republican support, African Americans began to gain power socially and politically. However, discrimination persisted, and African Americans struggled to find a place in American ...

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Overview

The end of the Civil War was a hopeful beginning for African Americans. Although President Lincoln left no definite plan for reconstruction, many Americans supported one, and the Reconstruction Act of 1867 was eventually passed. African Americans were given the right to vote, and the South was given assistance to rebuild itself. With Republican support, African Americans began to gain power socially and politically. However, discrimination persisted, and African Americans struggled to find a place in American society. When the nation fell into economic depression, interest in the Reconstruction decreased, thus leaving African Americans alone to face segregation and violence and to doubt the resiliency of their hard-won freedom. From the new set Slavery in the Americas, African Americans during Reconstruction explores this intriguing time in American history more thoroughly.

Topics include:

  • Lincoln and Reconstruction
  • The beginning of Reconstruction
  • The New Reconstruction Plan
  • The new African-American role in politics
  • African-American life under Radical Reconstruction
  • The end of Reconstruction
  • The legacy of Reconstruction.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Over the years, the Reconstruction period following the American Civil War has been portrayed as an era of mistakes, misjudgments, and error. In reality, the twelve years that made up the Reconstruction era (1865-1877) represented a time of great opportunity and amelioration of the terrible ills bred by the longstanding existence of slavery in the antebellum South. During the Reconstruction era, African-American men were given the right to vote, serve on juries, and actively participate in all levels of government. In the Reconstruction period a system of public education that included African-American children was begun in the South. Economic opportunities never before available to African Americans existed and many black men and women took advantage of them. Nevertheless, the forces of racism and white supremacy gradually seeped back into the very fabric of civil life and, by 1877, virtually all of those advances for southern African Americans were suppressed. In African Americans During Reconstruction, Richard Worth charts the course of progress and regression during that pivotal period of American history. In relating this ultimately unsuccessful age of reform, Richard Worth does an excellent job of capturing the events, keynote personalities, and spirit of those bygone years. Here, in this fine historical work, readers will encounter Klansmen, black reformers, white idealists, scallywags, and carpetbaggers. This chapter of the illustrated "Slavery in the Americas" series is an excellent resource and, perhaps, the finest book in a strong set. 2006, Facts on File/Chelsea House, Ages 10 to 14.
—Greg M. Romaneck
VOYA - Jamie S. Hansen
This six-volume series provides an overview of slavery in the Americas from the sixteenth century through the end of Reconstruction. Although the books cover slavery in North and South America, the focus is on the United States, with volumes on the Underground Railroad, Reconstruction, and the American Civil War. Three additional titles describe slave trade, life under slavery, and slave rebellions, including slavery within Afro-Caribbean and Latin American peoples. Worth's volume, African Americans During Reconstruction, embraces economic determinism in supporting the thesis that after 1877 newly freed African Americans fell back into another kind of slavery-economic servitude brought about by lack of educational opportunities, the sharecropper system, and Jim Crow laws. The virtues of this set of curriculum-based titles include an uncluttered layout, a readable typeface, and wide margins. Sidebars and shaded text blocks provide additional facts and biographical sketches. The publishers happily avoided the temptation to colorize the many black-and-white interior illustrations. Citations and source notes are lacking in all volumes. Although no doubt useful in media centers and public libraries, this series, if purchased as a complete set, is over-priced.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780816061396
  • Publisher: Chelsea House Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Series: Slavery in the Americas Series
  • Pages: 112
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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