African Theatre in Development

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Overview

"A truly worthwhile resource in a growing field of research—the theater and drama of Africa—this volume collects ten essays about theater practice, publications, and productions; in-depth reviews of 17 books; and a new play." —Choice

"... a 'must-have' for anybody interested in issues relating to theatre and development in Africa.... a pioneering effort... " —H-Net Reviews

Art as a tool, weapon, or shield? This compelling issue and others are explored in this diverse collection of intriguing perspectives on African theatre in development. Also here: strategies in staging, propaganda, and mass education, and a discussion of the playwright Alemseged Tesfai's career in service to Eritrean liberation.

Indiana University Press

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A truly worthwhile resource in a growing field of research—the theater and drama of Africa—this volume collects ten essays about theater practice, publications, and productions; in—depth reviews of 17 books; and a new play. The book first examines the pioneering work of Alec Dickson in encouraging the use of drama in community development and the emergence of a theater in Creole, using the slaves' deformed imitation of their masters' language (a corrupt form of French) to translate the experiences and cultures of Mauritius. Several practitioners and students of the Tigre/Bilen theater training course describe their efforts to nurture Eritrean cultures, including performing the music and dance of all nine language groups in its cultural troupes with audiences numbering up to 7,000, often in remote communities. Issues discussed include the impact of actors being mobilized for war; an Eritrean playwright on the front line during the struggle for liberation against an Ethiopian offensive; obstacles encountered when performances called attention to developmental problems in communities (e.g., health care, female circumcision, the unsanitary state of villages in general). Recommended for graduate students, faculty, and theater researchers, professionals, and practitioners interested in cultural studies, educational outreach and community theater, and ethnic studies." —E. C. Ramirez, St. Philip's College, Choice, July 2000
Choice
"A truly worthwhile resource in a growing field of research—the theater and drama of Africa—this volume collects ten essays about theater practice, publications, and productions; in—depth reviews of 17 books; and a new play. The book first examines the pioneering work of Alec Dickson in encouraging the use of drama in community development and the emergence of a theater in Creole, using the slaves' deformed imitation of their masters' language (a corrupt form of French) to translate the experiences and cultures of Mauritius. Several practitioners and students of the Tigre/Bilen theater training course describe their efforts to nurture Eritrean cultures, including performing the music and dance of all nine language groups in its cultural troupes with audiences numbering up to 7,000, often in remote communities. Issues discussed include the impact of actors being mobilized for war; an Eritrean playwright on the front line during the struggle for liberation against an Ethiopian offensive; obstacles encountered when performances called attention to developmental problems in communities (e.g., health care, female circumcision, the unsanitary state of villages in general). Recommended for graduate students, faculty, and theater researchers, professionals, and practitioners interested in cultural studies, educational outreach and community theater, and ethnic studies." —E. C. Ramirez, St. Philip's College, Choice, July 2000

— E. C. Ramirez, St. Philip's College

Choice - E. C. Ramirez

"A truly worthwhile resource in a growing field of research—the theater and drama of Africa—this volume collects ten essays about theater practice, publications, and productions; in—depth reviews of 17 books; and a new play. The book first examines the pioneering work of Alec Dickson in encouraging the use of drama in community development and the emergence of a theater in Creole, using the slaves' deformed imitation of their masters' language (a corrupt form of French) to translate the experiences and cultures of Mauritius. Several practitioners and students of the Tigre/Bilen theater training course describe their efforts to nurture Eritrean cultures, including performing the music and dance of all nine language groups in its cultural troupes with audiences numbering up to 7,000, often in remote communities. Issues discussed include the impact of actors being mobilized for war; an Eritrean playwright on the front line during the struggle for liberation against an Ethiopian offensive; obstacles encountered when performances called attention to developmental problems in communities (e.g., health care, female circumcision, the unsanitary state of villages in general). Recommended for graduate students, faculty, and theater researchers, professionals, and practitioners interested in cultural studies, educational outreach and community theater, and ethnic studies." —E. C. Ramirez, St. Philip's College, Choice, July 2000

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253213419
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 9/22/1999
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Martin Banham is Emeritus Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies in the University of Leeds and editor of The Cambridge Guide to Theatre (1988) and co-editor of The Cambridge Guide to African and Caribbean Theatre (1984).

James Gibbs teaches at the University of the West of England (Bristol) and has a particular interest in Ghanaian, Nigerian, and Malawian drama.

Femi Osofisan, playwright, teaches in the Department of Theatre Arts, University of Ibadan.

Indiana University Press

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Table of Contents

Strategies in Staging: Theatre Technique in the Plays of Zakes Mda - Carolyn Duggan

Propaganda and Mass Education: Alec Dickson and Drama for Development in the Gold Coast - James Gibbs

Theatre in Development in Mauritius: From a Theatre of Protest to a Theatre of Cultural Miscegenation - Roshni Mooneeram

Telling the Lion’s Tale: Making Theatre in Eritrea - Ali Campbell, Christine Matzke, Gerri Morriarty, Renny O’Shea, Jane Plastow and Students of the Tigre/Bilen Theatre Training Course

Alemseged Tesfai: A Playwright in Service to Eritrean Liberation - Jane Plastow

Performance Studio Workshop: Igboelerin East -Chuck Mike and Members of the PSW

Art as Tool, Weapon or Shield?: Arts for Development Seminar, Harare - David Kerr

Arts and Development II: Furthering the Agenda, Ibadan - Jumai Ewu

Fifteen Years Between: Benue and Katsina Workshops, Nigeria - Frances Harding

Practice and Policy in Theatre and Development: London Seminar, a Personal Response - Jan Cohen-Cruz

Notice Board

Play Script: Babalawo, Mystery-Master - Agbo Sikuade

Book Reviews

Index

Indiana University Press

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