After Abu Ghraib: Exploring Human Rights in America and the Middle East

After Abu Ghraib: Exploring Human Rights in America and the Middle East

by Shadi Mokhtari
     
 

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This book traverses three pivotal human rights struggles of the post-September 11th era: the American human rights campaign to challenge the Bush administration's 'War on Terror' torture and detention policies, Middle Eastern efforts to challenge American human rights practices (reversing the traditional West to East flow of human rights mobilizations and discourses)…  See more details below

Overview

This book traverses three pivotal human rights struggles of the post-September 11th era: the American human rights campaign to challenge the Bush administration's 'War on Terror' torture and detention policies, Middle Eastern efforts to challenge American human rights practices (reversing the traditional West to East flow of human rights mobilizations and discourses) and Middle Eastern attempts to challenge their own leaders' human rights violations in light of American interventions. This book presents snapshots of human rights being appropriated, promoted, claimed, reclaimed and contested within and between the American and Middle Eastern contexts. The inquiry has three facets: first, it explores intersections between human rights norms and power as they unfold in the era. Second, it lays out the layers of the era's American and Middle Eastern encounter on the human rights plane. Finally, it draws out the era's key lessons for moving the human rights project forward.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Insightful, sober, and forward looking analysis of the practice of human rights in the harsh realities of violent conflict and moral ambivalence. This is how to uphold principled commitment to human rights, through critical pragmatic optimism, not unrealistic naivety or futile mutual aggression.”

- Dr. Abdullahi A. An-Na’im
Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law
Emory University

“Critical of the constructivist theory’s omission of human rights violations in western states, Mokhtari examines the human rights discourse that emerged in the US after the torture of the US captives in the Abu Ghraib and other prisons became public. She shows that human rights advocacy has been successful in pushing the US courts and Congress to recognize the relevance of international human rights law, but only by reproducing the prevalent “East/West geography of human rights,” which treats the US as the origin and innate holder of international human rights norms and the East as the outlaw to be tamed and taught. Moreover, the Middle Eastern human rights NGOs appear to have accepted and internalized the core assumption of this binary. This book is not only original and timely, but it also has strong ethical and theoretical dimensions. As a documented commentary on policy, constructivist theory, and NGO strategies, it is a must reading for all who are concerned about human rights issues.”

- Zehra F. Kabasakal Arat
Juanita and Joseph Leff Professor
Political Science, Purchase College, SUNY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780511698538
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
04/27/2009
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Law and Society
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
667 KB

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Meet the Author

Shadi Mokhtari is Assistant Professor at the School of International Service at American University. She currently works with a domestic violence nonprofit organization in the Washington DC area and serves as the managing editor of the Muslim World Journal of Human Rights. She holds PhD and LLM degrees from Osgoode Hall Law School, York University; a JD from the University of Texas School of Law; a master's in international affairs from Columbia University; and a BA from American University. She has taught as an adjunct professor at Osgoode Hall Law School and has contributed chapters to books, including Islamic Law and International Law ('The Iranian Search for Human Rights within an Islamic Framework') (2007), Islamic Feminism and the Law ('Towards a New Agenda for Islamic Feminism:Clearing the Human Rights Minefield') (2008), and Migrant Women's Search for Social Justice ('Migrant Women's Interests and the Case of Shari'a Tribunals in Ontario') (2009). In 2006, she was selected as a 'new voices' panelist at the American Association of International Law Conference and was awarded honorable mention for the John Peter Humphreys Fellowship from the Canadian Council on International Law.

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