After Captain Cook: The Archaeology of the Recent Indigenous Past in Australia

After Captain Cook: The Archaeology of the Recent Indigenous Past in Australia

by Rodney Harrison
     
 

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Harrison (New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service, Sydney) and Williamson (heritage consultant, Melbourne) introduce this collection by explaining that they chose its title to evoke the figure central to Australia's colonial mythology, who is also a figure in Indigenous literature critiquing those myths. The title captures the central subject of the volume… See more details below

Overview

Harrison (New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service, Sydney) and Williamson (heritage consultant, Melbourne) introduce this collection by explaining that they chose its title to evoke the figure central to Australia's colonial mythology, who is also a figure in Indigenous literature critiquing those myths. The title captures the central subject of the volume: the application of the historical archeology of Aboriginal Australia in researching the shared history of Aboriginal and settler Australians. Drawing on case studies from across the continent, the contributors demonstrate the ways archeology can illuminate the responses of Indigenous Australians to European settlement and colonization. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Editorial Reviews

Canadian Journal Of Archaeology
This collection of papers is a resource for understanding how parallel situations are playing out elsewhere, allowing us to gain from their experiences, and for this reason alone the volume is worthwhile.
Australian Archaeology
These papers contribute significantly to Australia's archaeology and history.
— Judy Birmingham
Journal Of Anthropological Research
One can see this volume as a useful basis for viewing how Australian scholars, courts, and the Euro-Australian and Aboriginal publics are grappling with the role of archaeology in the current national land-rights debate.
Archaeology In Oceania, (1) April 2004 - Anne Ross
This volume is important, not just for archaeology and archaeologists, but also for Aboriginal peoples and the politics of their current situation with regard to connection to country. . . . This book breaks the cycle of division between history and archaeology. By re-uniting the two discourses of archaeology and history, and bridging the gap between pre-contact and the present, Rodney Harrison and Christine Williamson (as editors), and the individual authors of the papers in the volume, deserve our congratulations and thanks.
Australian Archaeology - Judy Birmingham
These papers contribute significantly to Australia's archaeology and history.
Journal of Anthropological Research
One can see this volume as a useful basis for viewing how Australian scholars, courts, and the Euro-Australian and Aboriginal publics are grappling with the role of archaeology in the current national land-rights debate.
World Archaeological Bulletin
As I entered my first year of archaeology, I searched for a good reason to make a career out of a subject which had up until then been a mere curiosity. For students like me, this book provides just that.After Captain Cook presents the reader with a diversity of issues and research projects pertaining to the archeaology of Indigenous Australia after 1788. . . . Harrison and Williamson provide a strong and sound rationale for such study, beyond simply the opportunity for [it]. . . . It's encouraging to see Indigenous concerns forming the basis for study, as well as prompting a conscientious consideration of the purpose of archaeological research. . . . Harrison and Williamson give us a well-rounded and timely look at the future of Indigenous archaeology. . . . Contact archaeology, as this volume advocates, has the potential to address issues of national importance in Australia and of direct relevance to archaeology in settler societies everywhere. The volume leaves the optimistic reader with a plethora of research areas to pursue methods to employ and bold goals to achieve.
Canadian Journal of Archaeology
This collection of papers is a resource for understanding how parallel situations are playing out elsewhere, allowing us to gain from their experiences, and for this reason alone the volume is worthwhile.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780759106567
Publisher:
AltaMira Press
Publication date:
03/01/2004
Series:
Indigenous Archaeologies Series, #2
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
8.44(w) x 11.26(h) x 0.94(d)

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